Daybreak’s John Smedley: EverQuest Next isn’t ‘vaporware’

Even though the big SOE-to-Daybreak transformation happened three months ago, the entire ordeal still feels fresh to many fans. An air of uncertainty permeates speculation about the studio’s future, and questions still swirl around regarding the fate of both the older games and those in development. Change is never particularly easy, even when it’s good, so to help put players’ minds at ease, President John Smedley was joined by Laura Naviaux, Senior Vice President of Global Sales & Marketing, to chat about the changes at a press conference call earlier this week, touching on the new logo, the Columbus Nova partnership, early access, and EverQuest Next vaporware worries. Read on for the run-down.

What does it all mean?

Just this past week, Daybreak unveiled its new logo. Naviaux says the name is meant to better reflect the identity of the company. She explained, “Daybreak speaks to the opportunities that each new day presents, the magic that happens at daybreak, and our renewed spirit each and every day to move online gaming forward.”

Each component of the logo has specific symbolism as well. The color red was chosen to reflect power, the owl eye (sorry, it’s not an owlbear eye as some of us had hoped!) refers to the nocturnal nature of gamers, and the gear embedded within the eye represents technology.

The search for a new home

Although many fans felt the break from Sony was abrupt, Smedley told the press that his studio had been looking for a new home for the last few years.”Sony was looking to get down to its core,” he explained, “and the PC games were never something they were super big on. That was always us.” Worried PC players can breathe easier as Daybreak plans to stay that way. As Smedley put it, “We’re not changing who we are; our core will still be PC gaming. The console stuff we’re adding on top of that because we want more people to be able to play the games we make.” Expanding in the console market is important, he says, as it’s already proven successful at bringing in new players. In DC Universe Online, more than 40% of the new registered players are on the PlayStation 4, and console players account for almost 76% of total hours played there. Revenue-wise, it doesn’t hurt that console players purchase items at a rate of 3.6 times higher that of PC players.

So why Columbus Nova? The fact that it’s an investment firm made many a fan wary that the acquisition heralded the beginning of the end. Smed argued that in reality, it is just a new beginning with a company that gets what Daybreak is about. Since there was no deadline rushing the process to procure the perfect partner, the company could take its time to find one that would be invested for the long haul. And take time it did: Smedley joked that they kissed plenty of frogs before finding the prince. Columbus Nova is, in Smedley’s words, a perfect fit.

A big question for fans is how Columbus Nova, a non-gaming entity, will affect decisions made on the studio’s stable of games. To allay those fears, Smed told us that Columbus Nova hasn’t “interfered” in game-related decisions at all. “Exactly the opposite,” he said. “In fact what they’ve done is supported us and given us the kind of money we need to invest further in some of our new stuff.” So is Daybreak focused on the new at the expense of the old? Nope, he told us. “Columbus Nova feels like EQ is what built this company, and they want to see it run forever.”

Just as players are feeling uncertainty, so, too, were the devs. Smedley admitted that they didn’t really know what life would be like after Sony. That makes sense; after all, breaking up is hard to do, and this couple had been together for 16 years. Yet the team needed to move on. So after three months, what’s it like working with the investment firm? “I can say it’s a lot more fun,” said Smedley, while Naviaux added that the partnership created the vigor and feel of doing a startup without any of the negatives.

Not-quite-All Access

Those looking at Daybreak’s all access plan will notice that titles are missing. Two of them are as-of-yet unlaunched and will join the pass when they do, but what about Dragon’s Prophet? Fans may remember last summer when Producer Todd Carson announced that the game would be added to the pass:

Within the next month or so players will be able to become a part of the system that gives special monthly bonuses in all SOE games, 500 station cash, and a 10% discount on all items in the store. Dragon’s Prophet players will receive a nine in-game items every month worth $50, including a 30-day repair hammer, teleportation, revive tokens, and more.

Carson said upfront that it took time to work out the details because it is made by Runewaker. So what happened to that done deal? Apparently it’s not so done after all. Smedley told me, “We’re working with our partners on that; the decision was theirs and we’re working with them to reconsider.”

Early days of early access

Early access is definitely a hot topic in gaming, but the practice is not quite a fan-favorite. Now that Daybreak has two early access games under its belt, is there anything that Smedley would do differently? “Nothing,” he answered, then pointed to the airdrop situation in H1Z1. “That’s not to say we haven’t made mistakes. The stuff that I would change a little bit would be thinking through the monetization stuff and making sure we telegraph that even more than we already are to make sure people understand that.”

Even though early access is about helping test the game and guide development, Smedley emphasized that it still has to be fun to play. Numbers seems to support the fact that players find H1Z1 fun as it continues to be one of the top-selling games on Steam. Even those not playing are getting in on the fun: To date more than 1.7 billion minutes of the game have been watched on Twitch, and it was the fifth and sixth most-streamed game in January and February, respectively.

EQN is still a thing

Of course, one topic that is on many fans’ minds is the progress of EverQuest Next. Smedley assured the press that the game is in great shape and continues to be developed. Currently the team is focused on building Qeynos, and he said the city looks amazing. “When we are ready to show it,” he said, “I think you guys are going to get blown away by a combination of what we’ve done and what our users have done.” Hopefully that’ll be sooner rather than later. As for those who claim that EQN is just vaporware, Smedley answered, “Whatever. Look at our company’s history — we are not about vaporware. We deliver.”

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177 Comments on "Daybreak’s John Smedley: EverQuest Next isn’t ‘vaporware’"

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mvpeets
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mvpeets

syberghost mvpeets agemyth Hm, I see your point. Bad example, though, by the way… In SC ships will be the lifeblood of the game, and a central part of the play experience both in FPS and space combat. Mounts in NW (And even STO ships) aren’t the same in that respect, and certainly don’t take nearly as much work to make. A mount, for instance, is basically just a model, a texture, and a set of animations at this point, seeing as all the other framework is in already.

syberghost
Guest
syberghost

mvpeets agemyth I don’t think “announce things before they’re done” is the issue; I think it’s more “sell thousands of dollars worth of things before they’re barely started.”

If Neverwinter charges $30 for a mount, people scream “OMG RIPOFF” but if SC charges $450 for a ship you can’t even use yet, the same people are “well don’t buy it if you’re POOR”. And some have been four times that much, or more.

mvpeets
Guest
mvpeets

agemyth Yes, exactly. Same case as Star Citizen. Just because they are developing the engine and world and not releasing updates to the playable client (because what they’re working on isn’t something episodic you can just patch into the client, lol) everyone assumes vaporware. It seems that companies will have to go back to the old model of not announcing things until they are basically done.

MattyOhMatty
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MattyOhMatty

We deliver… In a very very very very very very verrrrrrry long time. After we have removed 60% of the features we promised but only before we got your early access money. Good job Smedley.

karmamule
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karmamule

Thanks for the info, but my point in regards to DP was I just didn’t like the game regardless, so am not bothered if it’s included or not…. :)

syberghost
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syberghost

karmamule the DP thing is partially beyond their control; it’s not their game, it’s something they’re publishing in one region only on behalf of a Taiwanese developer. Runewaker has to agree to change it and then actually change it, and they’ve got nothing to gain by doing so (and plenty to gain by not doing so, since one-region changes increase their costs on an ongoing basis). Obviously that’s in part dependent on Daybreak coming up with terms they can agree to, but the point is DGC can’t just wave a wand and say “done, it’s part of AA now.”

karmamule
Guest
karmamule

I would be more upset about Dragon’s Prophet not being part of All Access but fortunately when I tried the game out I quite disliked it so no angst over that.

I’ve been having fun with last week’s big changes to Landmark, and with the “no more character wipes” promise I might actually start looking at trying to squeeze a few drops of creativity out of my barren wastelands of a brain.

And, EQN?  I’ll let their actions (or lack thereof) speak for themselves.  I love the ideas/concepts behind it, so if they actually come through I’ll be thrilled.  In the meantime I’ll be playing ESO and DA:I and PoE and any number of other games that are delighting me at the moment.

SirMysk
Guest
SirMysk

So in other words we’re never going to see EQN. I figured as much, but it’s still really disappointing. It was the first MMO I looked forward to in ages.

Zer0K
Guest
Zer0K

paragonlostinspace Yeah, but this conversation is quite old given SOE’s and especially Smed’s handling of past titles.
I’ve witnessed many posts like this in the past 10-15 years following SOE titles, and I’m yet to be proven completely off the mark when I employ skepticism when it comes to Smed..

agemyth
Guest
agemyth

paragonlostinspace agemyth “Btw I love how you allude that I am trolling (your “I’m not taking the
bait” comment) because I didn’t appreciate your insulting post. Nice
work that.”
You aren’t, from what I have seen, a troll and that is not what I was insinuating. I was merely pointing out that you have stated your issues and I have stated mine. No use arguing on something neither of us is likely to budge on. And I just really wanted to use your bike thing as an analogy :)
I don’t know that MJ was the one that “featured” the comment, but I imagine it can be baffling when people don’t seem to read and understand her reporting on and responses to Daybreak related issues like this. She dedicated a whole Tattered Notebook or EverQuesting article to explaining the difference between Landmark and EQN and what all that means. She would probably rather be playing these games than listening in on a boring PR conference and turning it into 1000+ words when there wasn’t even any real news to speak of.

syberghost
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syberghost

CrowingOne CazCore you say “did hinge” like that’s past tense. 100% of the work Storybricks did for them is still there, Daybreak today has as many or  more AI experts on the team than Storybricks did. All they dropped was an expensive relationship with a specific vendor, who had already done a significant body of work for them which remains in the systems and isn’t going away.

As for the “insistence it will run on mobile”, [citation needed]. They’re planning mobile things related to the game, but they already have mobile things related to EverQuest. Now they’ll just be writing them themselves, instead of farming them out. That’s not even remotely like porting this game to mobile. Your post is literally the first thing I’ve ever seen anybody say like that.

CazCore
Guest
CazCore

pepinocantador CazCore agemyth 
sure.  change the goalposts. 
but thanks for admitting your statement was unfounded at least.

since you are likely to not understand this reply, just like you don’t understand Daybreak’s strategy…… 
let me remind you that you claimed Landmark was distancing itself from EQN, when in fact, its %95 about EQN, and always has been.  quite the opposite of distancing.

CazCore
Guest
CazCore

CrowingOne CazCore 
 CrowingOne CazCore i saw that article already.
there
is no confirmation that all the same functionality won’t be there, or
that it isn’t ALREADY there, and was not deleted/removed from the
project when they downsized in concert with new management.

i try not to jump to conclusions about things i don’t know and that weren’t explicitly stated.  i guess that’s pretty rare too.

and actually, there was some explicit information you seem to be ignoring in that article:  ”’ They did a lot of work for us and we’ll be utilizing that. It’s not like that work is lost.”

The team said that it is “still committed” to making strong AI happen in the game. ”’

also, do you think the whole game hinges on ONE feature?

pepinocantador
Guest
pepinocantador

CazCore pepinocantador agemyth Well, I certainly was mistaken. When reading news for every other coming and past MMO, typically the most relevant articles are, in fact, on buildings and POIs. Yes, there are many dozens of important game systems, social features, stages of content and other things in an MMO, but as long as everyone knows that, yes, THAT building in Landmark is going to be in EQN?

I mean, that’s a level of hunger satisfaction that even a moving truck full of Snickers can’t match.

CazCore
Guest
CazCore

pepinocantador agemyth 
funny, i just watched one of their very regular and very long videos, and it was show all kinds of buildings and POIs that are going into EQN.
all within Landmark.
why is this so hard to grasp?

CazCore
Guest
CazCore

Zer0K CazCore the point is….. that’s irrelevant to what you quoted, and to the title of this article.

Zer0K
Guest
Zer0K

CazCore Zer0K
Those points show the poor decisions made by SOE (Daybreak) in their history.
SWG NGE is among the most notable.

Zer0K
Guest
Zer0K

syberghost Zer0K

I’m not talking about H1Z1 people.
When senior people jettison themselves or are jettisoned from a company just post a major changing of hands at executive levels,  most common reasons are (Salary Cut disagreement, Headcount Cut, company vision incompatibility, depature due to reassignment disagreement, …. to name a few).  I don’t think it is entirely unrealistic to think that the catalyst for them deciding to up and jettison themselves is due to the the split with SONY and acquisition of Columbus Nova.

pepinocantador
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pepinocantador

agemyth Given the very specific and intentional distancing of Landmark from EverQuest Next (via removing the EQN name and declaring it to be its own property), I’m not sure how you can objectively declare Landmark news to be EQN news. Might they share some underlying technologies? Sure. 

What does that tell anyone about the meat of EQN? Not a damned thing. Some mechanics and technologies in Landmark might be applicable to EQN? Okay?

_Ariel_
Guest
_Ariel_

I don’t blame him, for those blessed enough to live in colorodo there’s millions of dollars to made, it’s a modern gold rush.
Meanwhile the rest of the states will still throw you in jail over it /shrug.

syberghost
Guest
syberghost

Zer0K syberghost Jimmy Whisenhunt just left them and he was essentially the face of H1Z1, which is consistently one of the very top games on Steam despite only being in alpha. Why? Because he got an amazing opportunity at Twitch.

You really can’t read anything into the timing of senior people leaving a game unless you take into account context. Sometimes people leave because they don’t agree with the direction a game is taking and it’s the right direction. Sometimes they leave because they’re bored. Sometimes it’s family stuff.

I know a guy who left a very successful game, where he had a position of responsibility and was well liked by the community, because he had an opportunity to start a business growing legal marijuana. He loves games, but he is even more passionate about marijuana.

paragonlostinspace
Guest
paragonlostinspace

agemyth paragonlostinspace

Sorry, never really been into eating up tires by doing donuts on street bikes, though I did have a bit of fun as a kid and teenager on dirt bikes doing that in the 1970s. So there is that. Regardless, once again your response is to insult. Again I can’t understand why MJ made your original comment a “featured comment”. It was insulting to those who have legitimate criticisms of SOE/Daybreak Games recent news, operations and promises. Though you don’t want to address that, instead you want to insult those who are unhappy with the game company. Nice.

 I’m retired so I have a lot of free time, imagine that. Today though it is a beautiful day I’m hanging around the house. Doing some chores that need to be done like cleaning the parrot cages etc. In between I’m checking email and reading some Ars Technica that I’d also got behind on due to the previously mentioned cruises in the sun. Btw I love how you allude that I am trolling (your “I’m not taking the bait” comment) because I didn’t appreciate your insulting post. Nice work that.

agemyth
Guest
agemyth

paragonlostinspace agemyth
Responding to this post would be to simply restate what I and others have already said.
I’m not taking the bait for a cyclical argument. Go spin some donuts on your bike if going in circles is your thing.

CazCore
Guest
CazCore

CrowingOne its shaping up exactly as i expected.  but then again, i actually read their public statements and comprehend them.
something that’s apparently pretty rare.

CazCore
Guest
CazCore

Zer0K and all those things you mentioned were far from vaporware.
nice way to miss the whole point of the simple, short quote you’re responding to.

paragonlostinspace
Guest
paragonlostinspace

CthulhuDawg I do appreciate that he does engage with the community frequently, I just don’t believe much of what he says due to his batting average.

paragonlostinspace
Guest
paragonlostinspace

agemyth  

Wow, your post is the “Featured” comment?  (directed at MJ, Really MJ?) You telling people that they are shameful and whining, over being logically critical of some really badly handled recent choices by this company just really leaves a bad taste in my mouth.  It isn’t illogical to “want” news on EQN, some of us have no real interest in EQ Landmark and feel that SOE/Daybreak hurt themselves by dividing the mmo-rpg into two beasts and dividing resources. Is that really illogical? 

 Seriously, you can’t make sense of this? You can’t find the logic? Crap posts like this are why I am glad the weather has been so nice where I live so I can spend more time riding my motorcycle and less time reading MassivelyOP or gaming for that matter. (I’m basically turning on my system every other day lately) That you  and MJ for that matter can’t see the quite logical critical debate stance just boggles my mind. I think I hear my motorcycle calling me, your alls frame of mind and passive aggressive insults towards those of us who aren’t buying Smedley’s song and dance just are unacceptable.

paragonlostinspace
Guest
paragonlostinspace

syberghost Estranged melissamcdon Denice J Cook   I’d feel better about ” User Generated Content ” on a released product versus one that isn’t even released. Since it isn’t released I feel more in line with Estranged’s posts that you replied to.

paragonlostinspace
Guest
paragonlostinspace

Ok a few things. To me Smedley has at best a “spoty” believability factor. So anything he says I tend to take with a certain amount of skepticism. So when he says that they were shopping for years to find a new partner, while I believe that, I find that their choice and everything he said about Columbus Nova to be suspect.  I do appreciate the background on their choice of the new company symbol, even if the website looks like one of those corporate vanilla set ups.

My big criticism is how they handled news releases, how they handled their employees and how they’ve handled EQ Next. So basically to me they’ve got a lot work ahead of them to change my opinion of them as a company. So I look forward to seeing them prove a lot of us wrong and being something that many of us do not care for currently. I honestly do not think that is an unreasonable stance that many of us have in regards to this new version of SOE. It isn’t  the sky is falling or anything like that, it just “is” critical of what we’ve seen from them and with good reason.

syberghost
Guest
syberghost

Zer0K melissamcdon syberghost agemyth https://www.youtube.com/user/EverQuestNext/videos

The Workshop Show is entirely about the EQN development being done with Landmark, which is where the bulk of the player-exposed work is currently being done. Whether you like that this is how they’re developing it or not, that *IS* how they’re developing it, and they’re doing it right out in front of you.

Zer0K
Guest
Zer0K

syberghost Zer0K
The timing of the departure of these key members does not inspire confidence for me in what Daybreak is doing.
If they left at some other time, then I’d still be somewhat concerned, but not as much.  Attrition happens in any industry.
Everquest is a somewhat stable brand, no matter what questionable situations existed for the title in the past.
It’s hard to imagine that a new Everquest branded game wouldn’t see the light of day.

They, more than anyone, would have known the chances are high that EQN would be released.
Why leave a situation like that when you’re sitting on a likely winner.
UNLESS, scope was changed to such a point that they could no longer believe in the project.  Could it just be ‘StoryBricks’?  Or some
other reasons.

syberghost
Guest
syberghost

Estranged syberghost melissamcdon Denice J Cook in every one of the examples I cited, the UGC is available to the public instantly upon creation. I intentionally left out Player Studio, which is the “approved and filtered” of this space. It’s pretty much exclusively a Daybreak thing, and it’s one thing a lot of people cite as what’s great about their games.

Landmark is introducing something new to this arena; tools that are much easier to create with than Player Studio, which basically is just a program to let you use the tools devs use and get your work included and get paid in Daybreak Cash for it. Landmark’s tools are more accessible, and let your peers evaluate your work immediately. What they’re allowing, for the first time, is the people who’ve been fans of EverQuest since 1999 to have a hand in shaping EverQuest Next. That’s kind of amazing. You will be able to walk around in this familiar world and point to stuff and say “I helped make that”. There is a segment of the market that really, really wants to be able to do this, but can’t do it at the pace that allows them to get a full time job in the industry. With this model, they can do it at their own pace.

For example, I spent about 30 hours on a Star Trek Online mission that is not a bad little mission. It’s been well received. A pro could have done it to a similar level of quality in 10 hours. I’ll never be a pro mission designer. I get paid way more than they do, though, so I wouldn’t have minded spending a little money to enable my work. Fair trade; I got to make part of a game.

But keep in mind, operating a game costs money, and developing a game costs more money. In the past, the way new games have been funded is by taking the profits from your old games and putting them into your new ones. This has greatly decreased the number of new things you can work on, and has been noted many times recently in stories here, on mmorpg.com, and on gamasutra, most of those new things are going to fail.

This new model brings the possibility of keeping more of the successful game’s revenues going to extending THAT game, while a portion of the new game’s development costs are paid for by the people excited about that game. That means you can be working on both a Landmark and an EverQuest Next and an H1Z1, without having to shortchange DCUO and PlanetSide 2 as much. You can build a Neverwinter without having to stop development on Star Trek Online. That’s kind of awesome.

Sometimes it’s not going to work out; but at least the money was coming from people who were passionate about THAT game, not people who couldn’t care less about it. Under the old model, you would have been asking Star Trek Online players to take a content draught so Neverwinter could be better, and many of them have absolutely no interest in a fantasy game. Instead, they sold Founder’s Packs in advance that let those of us who were really interested in Neverwinter pick up some of the development tab, and those only interested in Star Trek Online see more of their money stay home in their chosen game.

Not 100%, obviously; developing a new game is hugely expensive. But more than under the old model.

If CCP had done this with World of Darkness, it would probably still be a thing, instead of having been gutted for EVE development so much it finally imploded.

I’m not saying the industry has fully figured out how to do this successfully or ethically yet, but I’m definitely assuming positive intent here. Most people are in this industry for the games, not for the money; if they were about the money they’d be working for Microsoft or Oracle or a Fortune 500 company’s IT division.

syberghost
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syberghost

Zer0K key members of every MMO team have left every MMO shop, forever. This is one of the highest turnover industries in IT. Part of it is due to the fact that games shops don’t pay as much as Fortune 500 shops, and part due to the fact that what they’re working on usually isn’t cutting edge. It can’t be, most cutting edge projects fail, and these are really low margin businesses. Dave Georgeson did an article about this on mmorpg.com recently; you have to have something experimental for your A players to work on to keep them around, but it’s probably never going to see the light of day and if it does it’s probably going to fail. That’s incredibly frustrating for A players, so they’re the ones most likely to leave. Even if your cutting edge stuff works out, it immediately turns into maintenance, and it’s not exciting anymore.

Many of those people who left had left previously, and come back. Some will come back again. This happens constantly in the industry, and not just to MMOs either. Some of them will go work on non-MMO games, find the grass isn’t greener, and come back home. Some will have left because they had a personal conflict with somebody and can, because the flipside of this workforce churn is that there’s always somebody who is dying to hire an industry vet.

You have to have a few of those A players on staff to keep the B players around who are going to make your game work; if there’s no A players to learn from, the B players leave. The C players will stick around because they’re not in demand, but they can’t produce saleable work by themselves; they need constant supervision from the B and A players. A shop full of B players can produce A work, but a shop full of C players can’t even produce B work. So you’re constantly looking for new A players to bring in, and they don’t come from a vacuum; they come from the other MMO shops.

Go read the Linkedin profiles on those people who’ve left; many of them have SOE in there twice. Others worked on other successful games and left while those games were still successful. When you’re in demand and you CAN move, and your old job turned into keeping the lights on, there’s a strong impetus to move.

syberghost
Guest
syberghost

Dr_Sweers SamVenice and let us keep in mind, with very few exceptions, every one of those programmers could make a lot more money programming for a Fortune 500 or a non-games startup; but they work in games, because they like games. If you work in IT and you look around at what your peers are making, these guys are mostly making less. They have even less ability to absorb a shortfall than we do. They just want to make games, but if they leave revenue on the table, their kids don’t eat.

On top of this, many of the shops are intentionally in geographic locations where they can recruit top talent, which are hideously expensive places to live. I know a QA person at a major MMO shop who is pretty senior and making good money for his industry, and has to have five roommates to pay the rent because the bay area is damn expensive. They would like to just concentrate on making great games and let the money come, but the money doesn’t come unless you encourage it. That’s just a fact; you operate your company based on that fact, or you go under and we all lament the passing of your games.

You HAVE to hype your game in advance, because unless you hit the magic lightning in a bottle, you will gain ZERO increase in revenues during the first two years after launch. You can almost directly tie the numbers together; if you spend $800 on marketing, you will get 100 players on launch day, 10 will remain past 30 days, and 1 will remain past one year. And you won’t see any growth for two years. Most games fall into these numbers, roughly. So any “free” hype you can get in prior to launch is beneficial, because 24 hours after launch you know what your next two years are going to look like.

10+% of them are already gone at that point.

Zer0K
Guest
Zer0K

agemyth
Just because Landmark has many of the likely things that we’ll see in EQN, it doesn’t mean that Landmark IS EQN.

People wanting EQN specific updates simply want just that.  Some(maybe many) of these people could care less about Landmark (fundamentally a building game at heart).

Most all the updates I’ve seen over the past few years have been focused on Landmark and Landmark systems, etc etc.  Sure, we’ll see a lot of elements of that in EQN, but it doesn’t mean it’s EQN.

Zer0K
Guest
Zer0K

melissamcdon syberghost agemyth
If there is ‘frequent’ EQN focused news, please point me to it.
Additionally, please show me all the youtube videos created specifically covering EQN.

Zer0K
Guest
Zer0K

“Whatever. Look at our company’s history — ” OK, to name a few:
SWG NGE
Vanguard: Saga of Hereos :  (saved it, but didn’t do it any favors, and instead  devoted resources to another game that closed down last year)
Planes of Power Expansion:  (some say this was the beginning to the end of original EQ classic experience, introducing insta-grat and portals galore all over the place)

So people are concerned that the ‘partnership’ with Columbus Nova will impact the development of Everquest Next.  Concerned that the partnership would create issues.  Instead Smed assures us that the partnership has been productive and Columbus Nova has been supportive, stating: “In fact what they’ve done is supported us and given us the kind of money we need to invest further in some of our new stuff.”

So, if all this support was provided by Columbus Nova, why then would a few of the key core members of the EQN Team depart?  They were unhappy with all the great support they were getting?  I mean, if extra money was provided, it shouldn’t have been a question of salary cuts that would have been a reason for their departure.
I thought they had great passion for the project and important to help it succeed.   Why didn’t you keep them?  Why would they decided to just jet on such a big and important project in their lives? 

Curious….

Radfist
Guest
Radfist

MikedotFoster Are you implying that SWG fans did not mass migrate to it’s spiritual successor… H1Z1?

Radfist
Guest
Radfist

I know they will deliver it eventually, but they started hyping it up far too early.  The reveal made it seem like it was a year or two away.  People lose interest.  Hopefully they learn from the experience and start hyping games up much closer to launch next time.

Kwasimoto
Guest
Kwasimoto

Nanulak The problem doesn’t lie in the studio but with the community. I teased the idea of implementing a system similar to that of Combat Power in Mabinogi and got downvoted off of reddit.

Dr_Sweers
Guest
Dr_Sweers

SamVenice This is very true and an excellent point.  Smedley, is and always has been an excellent cheerleader for his company.  That’s part of his job.  He has a responsibility to promote and push his product(s) to consumers.  Don’t get me wrong, companies and individuals don’t make games just because.  They do it to put food on the table and clothes on their backs like the rest of us.  With that said, I completely agree…I miss the passion in game making where it wasn’t just about turning a hefty profit and bumping your stock value up a few cents.  There are still game makers out there, however, that do have a passion for game making that aren’t tied to shareholders.  It’s a bit like shopping at your mom and pop shop rather than the big box stores…we all just need to do it more often:)

ManastuUtakata
Guest
ManastuUtakata

Skyewauker squidgod2000 
/tu quoque
…now perhaps we can we provide a better rebuttal.

syberghost
Guest
syberghost

MJ Guthrie melissamcdon Rozyn Gottphoenix the only question is whether I’ll buy a $200 pack or a $300 pack, and the answer is up to DGC ’cause they’ll be setting the price.

ManastuUtakata
Guest
ManastuUtakata

melissamcdon drypulse Elikal Ialborcales 
And PS: Knock it off you two.

ManastuUtakata
Guest
ManastuUtakata

Elikal Ialborcales 
I dunno, that looks like that kinda hurts. o.O

ManastuUtakata
Guest
ManastuUtakata

drypulse Elikal Ialborcales 
…no a metaphor.

Nanulak
Guest
Nanulak

I have no doubt that EQN in not vaporware but I do doubt its eventual success.  If they go the way of everyone is a superhero I have serious reservations.

SamVenice
Guest
SamVenice

Nowadays, all the big guns in this industry giving big speech, press releases, and the likes are actually addressing the STOCK MARKET / investors, not their customer base.
It’s really all that is: contrary to other sectors, gaming industry is an unregulated wild west with rights to take your money and absolutely no obligation to deliver a quality product/service. 
There is no SLA for online game services. I’m surprised that the EFF is completely silent about this, considering the  bazillion of $$ this industry moves around.

They can false advertise, hype, bait-and-switch and get away with it because there’s a legislation gap that allows pretty much any dodgy  practice to be ok just because nobody ever said is not ok.

I so miss the 90s, when game studios/publishers were creating digital art masterpieces for a niche, suits-free market.
So yeah, until proven wrong with facts, EQN is vaporware.
Any Daybreak spokesperson saying otherwise without anything to show for it, is just trolling the customer base and keeping the investors at bay.

jeremy2020
Guest
jeremy2020

Every time Smedley assures us that everything is fine, I tend to feel like every thing is very much not fine.

syberghost
Guest
syberghost

Estranged syberghost melissamcdon Denice J Cook you really don’t get User Generated Content, Estranged. Nobody’s being duped here; we’re being empowered. Your arguments apply equally to EQ2’s Dungeon Maker, City of Heroes’ Mission Architect, Star Wars Galaxies’ persistent housing, APB’s custom clothing and cars, STO and Neverwinter’s Foundry, and anything else with a paid component that in any way impacts producing UGC.

I don’t see the difference between paying $20 for permanent access to a canvas and walking into your local art store to buy a canvas, except that the UGC deal is WAY better because you can reuse that canvas forever.

wpDiscuz