The Game Archaeologist: Multiplayer BattleTech

It was the 31st century, where feuding factions decided to settle their differences by throwing multi-ton war robots at each other. It was also 1984, when Jordan Weisman and L. Ross Babcock III created a tabletop wargame called BattleTech (originally BattleDroids). This new game allowed players to pit heavily-armed ‘Mechs against each other in a fight to the brutal, laser-singed death.

BattleTech was a hit and spawned a franchise that not only included the tabletop and pen-and-paper roleplaying game but an entire series of video games as well. This is one of those franchises where players are super-duper serious about their hobbies, forming lances and companies with friends that would stick together as they experienced the range of mediums.

In 1987, Weisman and his crew began to build “virtual world centers” where players could get into an oversided arcade pods to play BattleTech against others in the room. This early stab at a 3-D multiplayer title would be but a herald of greater gaming to come.

MechWarrior (1989)

While there had been other BattleTech video games prior to this one, MechWarrior was the first computer title that portrayed the action in a 3-D world. The player saw the action from the perspective of a ‘Mech pilot and could maneuver around the field, attacking other ‘Mechs and assisting computer allies.

The move to 3-D and the multitude of choices that players experienced made MechWarrior a fast hit, spawning a long-running series of single-player BattleTech games. However, it was also about to branch off into a new direction thanks to an aggressive studio looking for online gaming potential.

Multiplayer BattleTech: EGA (1991)

Kesmai, one of the very first studios that dealt with online gaming, had been successful with a streak of popular titles on the GEnie gaming service. One of its hottest titles was Air Warrior, a multiplayer game that allowed players to take to the skies in fighter planes in an attempt to shoot each other down. As they expanded the studio’s portfolio, Kesmai’s owners were looking for a ground-based equivalent to Air Warrior. With MechWarrior, they figured they found their answer.

The MechWarrior engine was modified to work in a multiplayer online environment, and in December 1991, Multiplayer BattleTech: EGA (MPBT) went online. The end result struggled with a poor performance but worked enough and was novel enough that it brought in the crowds.

Players would organize companies, roleplay, and socialize with the game’s text chat, but then get down to business with the on-field combat. There were five houses (factions) from which to pick, each of which would struggle to control planets. It was a thrill for players to be stomping around in ‘Mechs with three other friends alongside, and the game’s attempt at delivering strategic elements (such as repair, supply lines, and a variety of ‘Mechs) kept gamers coming back.

It was expensive to get hooked on MPBT, however. The game charged by the hour, depending on the service and time of day. There were reports of it being as costly as $18/hr. during primetime, although most players could expect to burn through a buck or three an hour as part of the package.

Multiplayer BattleTech: EGA didn’t get the best reviews during its run, but its popularity more than convinced Kesmai that the concept had potential — and a future.

Multiplayer BattleTech: Solaris (1996)

The EGA era of Multiplayer BattleTech wound down by 1996 as Kesmai furiously worked on an improved sequel. Beta testers flocked to see what Solaris offered (it helped that the beta period was completely free) and then stuck around as it launched in the summer of 1997 to rave reviews.

“This game rocks, and it rocks hard,” Gamespot said at the time, echoing the feelings of the growing playerbase. With gameplay that was easy to pick up, greatly improved graphics, and multiplayer across faster modems, Solaris overcame EGA’s weak spots to become the ‘Mech MOBA that players were craving.

“This game was a revelation to my sprouting video game mind,” one blogger wrote years later. “You mean I could game with people all over the world? […] There was little else that was as satisfying as linking up several large lasers in one glorious mech-disabling salvo.”

Solaris was a free download but stuck to the hourly charge for the early years of its run (between $1.25 and $2.75 an hour). It was available on AOL, CompuServe, and GameStorm (as well as through other services) and required only that you had a computer that could handle its mighty recommended specs, such as 15 MB hard drive space and a 9600-baud modem.

What was once hundreds of players in Multiplayer BattleTech: EGA became thousands in Solaris, fighting with and against each other in the game’s deadly arenas. Players had the choice of up to 80 ‘Mechs to pilot and developed favorites during their careers. There was even a metagame that was furthered by Kesmai’s seasonal tournaments and the like.

Solaris was a good thing, and Kesmai was not about to ignore the future of one of its most profitable and popular titles. Work began on a second sequel, but any excitement over the franchise’s future was about to come to a crashing halt.

Multiplayer BattleTech: 3025 (2001)

As the internet age blossomed and MMOs began to sprout left and right, Kesmai started constructing a worthy successor to the Multiplayer BattleTech franchise. The game was called Multiplayer BattleTech: 3025 and was to get past the confines of Solaris’ arenas to present true worlds at war.

Fans who got into the beta for Multiplayer BattleTech: 3025 had glowing things to say about the across-the-board improvements. The game was to be truly massive, allowing for up to 10,000 gamers to play alongside each other simultaneously. There was true planetary conquest, 4v4 matches, and a vibrant economic system.

As so often happens to promising games, 3025 was ultimately hampered by unfortunate business decisions. Kesmai was acquired by Electronic Arts in 1999, which should have been a warning sign to any fans following the series. The game went back to the drawing board following the buyout, with features shifted and changed.

Ultimately EA shut down Kesmai at the end of 2001, taking with it any chance of 3025 releasing. The team announced the closure of the beta with sadness in December of that year: “We understand that Multiplayer BattleTech: 3025 holds a remarkably strong community, with equally strong ties to BattleTech history, as it moved from EGA, to Solaris and of course this beta. We are extremely grateful to have brought, at least, a small part of our BattleTech vision directly to you.”

And the ‘Mech marches ever on

While the Multiplayer BattleTech saga rumbled to a stop in 2001, MechWarrior games remained very much a thing. There were high hopes in the old MPBT community when MechWarrior Online was announced and then released a little while back, and while I can’t comment with authority as to how it’s been received, I do think that it’s a testament to the popularity of the old online games that it got made at all.

Did you play Multiplayer BattleTech? If so, share some of your memories below!

Believe it or not, MMOs did exist prior to World of Warcraft! Every two weeks, The Game Archaeologist looks back at classic online games and their history to learn a thing or two about where the industry came from… and where it might be heading.
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26 Comments on "The Game Archaeologist: Multiplayer BattleTech"

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ALPisanelli
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ALPisanelli

I do remember bumping into my old Clan leader and few my underlings playing Socom 2 years ago on the PS2 and we ended up reforming the clan for a short time

ALPisanelli
Guest
ALPisanelli

I used to be in a clan called Demonz towards the end of my time with MPBT, it was a splinter clan of a clan who name I cant remember. Don’t even remember the house we played for it was that long ago =and most of us where playing over AOL. Don’t remember my old call sign either I just remember I had made it it to one step below General before we split the Clan and I transfered into Demonz as a Lft. General.

paragonlostinspace
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paragonlostinspace

BriarGrey paragonlostinspace MichaelMcInnis HunterTBC                                   

    Hmm, yeah that sounds right, on Steph. Look at you, two broken fingers (well healing broken fingers) and typing from the office since I assume you left the gym already, I’d call that better with age for sure. lol. “Now” I”m off to shower and go for a ride. ;p

BriarGrey
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BriarGrey

paragonlostinspace BriarGrey MichaelMcInnis HunterTBC There was  Steph based at Simu HQ – I think she did art?  Nice person.

For the home viewing audience:  SOME of us just get better with age….

paragonlostinspace
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paragonlostinspace

BriarGrey paragonlostinspace MichaelMcInnis HunterTBC

Ugh, did it again. Now to recall who Steph was. lol. Yeah I meant Melissa, Matt/VR’s wife. Sheesh. Post fifty your mind goes, think I’ll go shower and take a long ride on the Harley. Love ya hon, thanks for being my memory. Cya tonight. :)

BriarGrey
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BriarGrey

paragonlostinspace MichaelMcInnis HunterTBC It’s always amusing when he messes something up and then frets about it….all night :)  (He means Melissa where he says Steph, btw….definitely blame the decades.  On him.  *I* am pristine).

Briar here aka Heathyranne/Valyxia/Xynwen in GS…the only place I knew TBCers :)  Good to see you, Mike! (oh yeah, also known as that deadelf’s better half and keeper of the memory apparently).  <3

paragonlostinspace
Guest
paragonlostinspace

MichaelMcInnis paragonlostinspace HunterTBC

Pinhead/Mike! :) I was hoping Hunter would reply again so I could ask how all the rest of you were doing! I was so damn mordified that I swapped Jim and Rich in my head as I when I typed that post out. I know Matt’s/VR out CA or was though I think he might be in Texas now because I thought I recall the wife mentioning that Steph got a transfer out there with Blizzard. Though I could be further miss-recalling.

 I don’t do Facebook being the anti social sob who likes his sanity so I’ve lost track. I know the wife keeps track of a lot of folks including old Simu folks and mentioned a few folks off an on doing this or that. 

 Congrats on being a grandparent now. Ours are all in college and running us ragged even from across the country, but no grand kids yet. Though I wouldn’t mind myself being a grandparent. :) Really good to know you’re still around my friend. :) Oh and I noted that the TBC has a group started in Star Citizen, pretty cool. I’m watching it myself and waiting to see how it develops further. 

 Tell the rest of the TBC I said “hi”, hope they are doing well. Damn, time flies. Glad I checked email before heading to bed to read. :)

Jim aka MacFarlane*GK* aka Celtar”Reroll? Who me?” Lomion    ;)

MichaelMcInnis
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MichaelMcInnis

paragonlostinspace HunterTBC 
MacFarlane?  Ya old Butthead!  T’is Pin.  Quite a few of us still get together and kick back a few.  Been to a few TBC weddings, and a whole generation of kids is around now to show us the error of our ways (mine is 32 and I’m a Grampy now).

paragonlostinspace
Guest
paragonlostinspace

HunterTBC

   Yep, I’m aware that Rich/Ice founded the TBC. :) Oh crap, I see what I did up there, I put Jim/Ghostrider’s name in place of Rich/Ice. Crap, blame it on the decades man. Two very different people as you know.  Wow, I can’t believe I did that error. Just replace GR and Ice’s names in the post.

 Rich/Ice will recall me from back in the 1970’s table top gaming at Flight of the Pegasus gaming shop. :) Back when he still worked for the U.S. Post Service. I still recall that one phone call when I put it together that he, Ice was the same guy. heh. Color me really embarrassed though for mixing up their names. 

 Jim aka MacFarlane

HunterTBC
Guest
HunterTBC

Ice founded and ran The Bloody Clans unit. We are all still friends after all these years and still game together. But no game has quite captured us like the community in EGA MPBT did.

DamnDirtyApe
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DamnDirtyApe

When I was a kid I got an offer for something like 150 free hours on GEnie that I used on MPBT.  It was a great community and a lot of fun.  The ‘community warfare’ features of the game were actually quite substantial, and if I remember right it took into accounts thinks like supplies and supply lines and spare parts for mechs you were assigned.  I seem to remember the unit I was in had some special really nice mech that took some gyro damage, and since gyro repair parts were pretty rare that mech was out of action for quite a while.

It’s a shame that MW:O is such an incredible disappointment.

Rebel Engie
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Rebel Engie

barantorfwl
My experience too.

goldstariv
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goldstariv

Solaris was the ish.. I remember getting my mom to subscribe to Gamestorm and it being the very first game I got hooked on, although the service had a few great games like Aliens Online.. Always tons of people online and the house wars were back and forth.

Good times.

paragonlostinspace
Guest
paragonlostinspace

EA screwed Kesmai, I would have liked to have seen what Kelton and John could have done long term. As to charges the base charges in the early 1990s was $6.00 an hour for non prime time which ran from 5pm to 8am. During prime time the charge was 12.00 an hour. Some of us didn’t have a GEnie node connection so we had to pay an additional $2.00 an hour to use a Sprint Net node to access GEnie’s network. Oh and if you wanted to play at 9600 baud instead of 2400 baud that cost more too, which slips my mind at this time.

I was a House Davion player who rose to Lft.General, was a Gunslinger (a part of House Davion’s Solaris dueling unit versus mercenaries and other Houses) and later on went mercenary when Ghostrider who ran The Bloody Clans mercenary unit drew me over. I actually knew Ghostrider from old tabletop gaming days in southern California which amused and amazed me at the time with once again noticing how small the world was since I was across the country from him at the time and hadn’t seen him in a decade. Later on I ended up returning to House Davion and irking a lot the TBC for the defection. I’ve long since lost track of all those guys who played MPBT, but there were indeed some great memories. 

 If I recall I think my Comstar ID was 5033. Some reason that set of numbers comes to mind. Too bad I recently threw out all that old gaming stuff that was in storage for 16 years. A lot of old dot matrix print outs on various information for units, The Ghost Mech Cafe stories from the old GEnie Forums etc. Good times.

haggus71
Guest
haggus71

Moral of the story:  There is no great idea that EA can’t totally kill.

Mailvaltar
Guest
Mailvaltar

Hell yeah, Battletech. :-)

Played the hell out of the tabletop. Digitally, I actually liked the most a version in 2D on Amiga. Looked a bit like an early Battle Isle. Can’t remember the title though.

Cyberlight
Guest
Cyberlight

Wow, I think I had that 1989 version of Mechwarrior on my old 486 PC.

captainzor
Guest
captainzor

wooo I loved this game!  Was so fun to fight for your house and see the results play out day by day on the map of the inner sphere.  Such graphics! xD

Alien Legion
Guest
Alien Legion

This.  This is why I love your site.  Not only games we play now, but ones that remind me of days gone by.  Well done.

skoryy
Guest
skoryy

wolfyseyes I miss my Warhawks and Ice Ferret. ._.

phobosad
Guest
phobosad

Solaris was the first game I played that could almost be called a graphical mmo.  What I remember being great about that game, even more than the actual game play, was the community.  People role played by “joining” a house and advancing through the ranks.  There was no actual facilitation for this role playing in the game, but people made it work by changing their names to contain their rank and house/division designations.  I think it’s a great example of what can happen in a game when there’s a dedicated community there to support it.

quixadhal
Guest
quixadhal

Back in college, we took a trip to Chicago and played the Battletech pods there.  Stood in line for an hour to play for 10 minutes, but it was pretty amazing.  They said the pods were powred by 4 mac quadras, one for each display and one for the interface and networking.

Of course, a few years later Mechwarrior 4 on a LAN easily stomped that version, but there was something to be said for sitting in the pod hardware and having actual “realistic” controls to work. :)

barantorfwl
Guest
barantorfwl

I played it from the early days onward but lived far too out of the way to ever see the pods. Most of my love of battletech came from the console games and then onto the computer games later. 

I want to like MWO, but as much as it is visually wonderful it is woefully underwhelming in bringing battletech to life.

wolfyseyes
Guest
wolfyseyes

I was head of the Merc company The Order of the Crimson Shield during MechWarrior 3, its expansions, MechWarrior 4 and its ex-pack before everyone turned in. It wasn’t a true “persistent world” exactly (matches were all player-made lobbies in the MSN Gaming Zone), but we wrote RP stories in our own forum, played under strict Clanner ROE while in-game, and even made it a mission to name cheaters for others to avoid.
I bought MW3 on a whim. I ended up getting deep in to a rich lore and making friends that lasted for years–even one whom I still touch base with once in a while.
Oh, I miss my ER Laser boat SCat….

Khalith
Guest
Khalith

There used to be a set of these over at a local Jillian’s (which later became a place called Dave and Buster’s), playing those pods was awesome, my friends and I would go there quite often and have a blast with it.

skoryy
Guest
skoryy

Star Commander Mikhailoft of Clan Smoke Jaguar, Battletech 3056 MUSE reporting in! In the mid-’90s, there were a cluster of MUSE-based Battletech simulators of varying time periods and themes. 3025, 3056, Solaris, etc. No 3D graphics, no HUDs, maps and status had to be constantly refreshed by command. Initially it was set up as battle arenas, though I do believe some of the later games actually migrated to something resembling an open world. For all of its limitations, however, it was fun as heck. And we even got into the RPing aspect, my times as a Clan mechwarrior were the first times I really got into RP online. 

The code eventually transferred over to MUX, I lost touch as I moved into other text RP genres. it looks like there may still be servers alive out there but I’d have to Beip over to test:

http://www.sarna.net/wiki/MUX

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