The Daily Grind: How would you mix MMO features to create the best one ever?

Today’s Daily Grind question — more like command! — from Massively OP Kickstarter donor Tim is short and sweet:

Mix features to create your perfect MMO.

It always drives me nuts when MMO developers start from scratch — or borrow the tent poles of a single title — when building a new game. There are so many great MMOs out there with so many great ideas. Steal from all of them, right?

My thoughts on what I’d do change every few months, but here’s what I’m feeling today: I’d mix City of Heroes’ level, zone, and combat design with Star Wars Galaxies’ non-combat and housing activities, Glitch’s brilliant crafting system, Guild Wars’ heroes and travel, Guild Wars 2’s cosmetics, WildStar’s setting, and ArcheAge’s character designer. Would that stuff make sense together? Probably not without some work, but I’d play it!

How about you? What favorite game features would you mix together to create the perfect MMO?

Every morning, the Massively Overpowered writers team up with mascot Mo to ask MMORPG players pointed questions about the massively multiplayer online roleplaying genre. Grab a mug of your preferred beverage and take a stab at answering the question posed in today’s Daily Grind!
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70 Comments on "The Daily Grind: How would you mix MMO features to create the best one ever?"

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syberghost
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syberghost

spacecampclan syberghost Gevah that school of thought is primarily characterized by games that launch without a group finder and then have to retrofit one because it turns out customers want what they want, and won’t give you money if they don’t get it.

Developers that don’t listen to their customers never understand exactly why they failed; that is, until after they go work for one that does. Then they get it.

spacecampclan
Guest
spacecampclan

syberghost spacecampclan Gevah Again, you miss the point entirely. There are professionals that determine what people will like. These people do indeed sample the public and test their products on them. They are professionals that are educated and understand psychology, marketing and the practical application of art.

These people do NOT ask the players how to develop MMOs. They do not ask the general public what systems they should use or how to create them. Tolkien didn’t post an internet poll saying “Hey guise, whats yer favorite fantasy characters? I’m makin some books and I need yer advices”.

Developers that can’t use professional resources to develop their games are complete failures.

syberghost
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syberghost

spacecampclan syberghost Gevah Never mind what the customers want, our research says this is better, and they’ll like it or lump it!

Those folks are going to be deciding whether to pay your salary or not.

spacecampclan
Guest
spacecampclan

syberghost spacecampclan Gevah You misunderstand. Developers should be consulting with PROFESSIONAL game testers and other developers. The general public will give you bad information, every time.
“If I had asked people what they wanted, they would have said faster horses.” – Henry Ford

syberghost
Guest
syberghost

spacecampclan Gevah no, this is absolutely the opposite of that. Your doctor isn’t trying to create something that people will enjoy playing enough to pay him for it; asking your customers what they enjoy more is never a mistake. You can make mistakes incorporating their feedback, but ignoring it is every bit as bad.

You’re also making some pretty big assumptions if you think none of that feedback is coming from pros. Everybody working in the gaming industry plays games. Most of them could make more money somewhere else, but they do games instead because they love them. I’ve seen folks leave the company I work for and go across the street to <major AAA game studio> for less money because they love games.

I am one of the people running an IRC network that caters to game developers, and you know what they do all day? Talk about each other’s games. Under fake gamer names that aren’t the same as the ones they use on their forums. Many of the folks you see posting here on these forums are professional game devs.

vinicitur
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vinicitur

nameistake12 LOL. Pretty much what I thought of doing.

spacecampclan
Guest
spacecampclan

Gevah spacecampclan I didn’t say that people couldn’t think whatever they want. It’s just a bad sign when game developers are asking for help from the general public. Imagine being sick and going to the doctor, but he couldn’t figure out what was wrong and decided to ask for help on a public forum. It’s idiotic to say the least, and yet, here we are.

crackfox
Guest
crackfox

The setting would have to be Middle Earth, although I would probably take the time setting from the ICE Merp tabletop (TA1640) along with that game’s selection of races (Woses, Dunlendings etc) and I’d adapt its critical/fumble system to suit a CRPG. Visually, the game would have that sort of painterly style seen in games like Dishonoured, influenced by the art of Alan Lee. I would take a lot of SWG’s non-combat elements although not its open-world housing. The UI would be minimal, similar to TESO, and I’d also take elements of TESO’s combat, along with its skill system, decentralized auctions and exploration aspects. TOR’s voice acting.  LoTRO’s player music system. APB’s character creator. SOEmote maybe. 
Jeremy Soule would compose the music, retaining some of the rustic elements of LoTRO’s score. The world would be huge and seamless, like Vanguard but on a far bigger scale and without the chunking issues. The payment method would have to be premium subscription, possibly with a discrete cash shop offering services but not cosmetics, mounts or pets.

Gevah
Guest
Gevah

spacecampclan No, i say let them imagine and dream, let them draw ideas and design systems, maybe .. just maybe; someone might take the idea to the next level, make it happen, they will face so many challenges and they’ll understand how hard it is to design and make anything.
Let’s not forget that many “professionals” started as amateurs who wanted to make their own games.

spacecampclan
Guest
spacecampclan

mourasaint spacecampclan wjowski Oh look, an egocentric kid that plays games for 2 hours a day.