Exploring ‘The Video Game Debate’: Online games and internet addiction

Massively OP’s overview of Rachel Kowert and Thorsten Quandt’s book The Video Game Debate last month was just the beginning of our coverage of the topics contained within it. I advised MMO players and writers to pick up the book and read it for themselves, but for those who don’t, today I’ll break down some of the ideas expressed in various chapters of the book and try to relate them to the world of MMOs specifically.

We’ll be starting with chapter five by Mark D. Griffiths. The topic? Gaming and internet addiction.

Image attribution: Damien du Toit

mmom, art image 000Setting the scene

Prior to 2000, most research on games and addiction focused on behavioral addiction, mostly through self-reporting or self-diagnosis by those who were perceived to have a problem. This is critical because it’s like looking at a disease based on who has it, not where it came from.

While it can be beneficial to see who has a problem, ignoring the origin of that problem potentially leaves anyone and everyone vulnerable. The studies at the time were rather small-scale, and the criteria were based on pathological gambling criteria. While that may be more valid with today’s lockbox obsessed “free”-to-play games, it didn’t exactly help anyone understand why someone would choose to play Mario Bros obsessively instead of going to the the movies with friends.

Nick Yee‘s work in 2006 is a good example of how research could suddenly pool a larger sample size from a greater variety of people, but there were also more medical tests being done as well as research into visual and mental tests and even patient history. During this time, there were about 60 studies done on game addiction, mostly on MMOs like World of Warcraft and EverQuest.

In short, studying game addiction is still a rather new field, and it’s far from perfect. Online gaming addiction under the suggested name “Internet Gaming Disorder (IGD)” was not even included in the fifth edition of the industry standard Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders because it’s been so difficult to define.

If it’s not obvious from that sentence, this means that, at the moment, video game specific addiction is not real. You may be addicted to an aspect of gaming, like lockboxes or competitive play, but these are things that you could be addicted to in other settings, like gambling or work addictions.

I’m going to keep talking about it as if it were real since, well, in our culture, people seem to believe it is. While there are clinics that specialize in game addiction, especially in Asia, IGD needs to be proved as something more than a potential culture-bound syndrome. There needs to be valid, cross-culturally relevant symptoms, an identifiable rate of the problem across the world, and an original cause connected with biological features before it can be featured in the Manual of Mental Disorders.

Debating definitions

One of the definitions Griffiths’ chapter in the book explores is that of addiction as an “uncontrollable urge to consume a substance or engage in activities which are harmful to oneself or cause interpersonal problems.” That is, you can do it as much as you like, but when you are choosing to game when making that choice can damage your physical, mental, or social health, it’s a problem. Yes, that means when you blow off talking with your in-laws from out of town, anyone who doesn’t want to sleep on the couch can reasonably say you seem addicted.

To try to be more specific, Griffiths also described addiction in terms of six criteria: salience (cravings, behavioral changes), mood modification, tolerance (having to play more), experiencing withdrawal (not necessarily the shakes, but some sort of physical sign that you’re coping from the loss of something), relapse if the player tries to tone down/quit gaming, and conflict (with friends/family, work, or even within oneself). The idea is that, should someone meet three or more of these criteria and maintain them for 3-6 months, there’s a good chance he or she is addicted.

However, salience, mood, and tolerance are also signs of high engagement, a healthy kind of obsession. For example, I’ve been working pretty hard on an online games education project MOP’s editor-in-chief hinted at back in September. A co-worker who didn’t know about my project was worried about some of my overtime. I’ve been a little more tired than usual (mood), I’ve been more glued to my tablet than usual (salience), and admittedly there’s been a good deal of head smacking (that’s conflict, but mostly with myself). However, this is compared to over the summer when we had almost no work and I was literally in tears over my boredom at work sometimes (there’s only so much research I can enjoy when I know I’ll have no chance to apply it in the near future).

While to an outsider, it may look like a problem, the project is actually something that’s fulfilling in a way my usual work hasn’t been able to satisfy me, and I’ve been able to carry over that enthusiasm into my other work duties. In short, it’s possible to over-diagnose addiction if you use this definition.

This is why “Internet Gaming Disorder” needs to meet specific requirements before it’s considered a real problem. Because there’s no hard definition, it’s difficult to look at how widespread “problematic online gaming” is. There have been some large studies that have tried to pinpoint the issues, but overall, they seem to indicate it’s under 10%.

Guild Chat, confused gamersGamer demographics and potential for addiction

This may not surprise anyone, but as Dr. Kowert’s previous research indicated, online gamers tend to play more than offline gamers. This already, sadly, makes us more susceptible to at least seeming as if we have an addiction. However, there are lots of different kinds of MMO players. We can’t just all be lumped together, right?

One thing I really liked about this chapter was that it provided some good data on who the gamers are in at least one large study (4,374 participants), and it gave some big details on MMO fans too! In this study, the mean age was 21; 91% of the participants were male, and 66% of them were single. The average weekly game time ranged from between less than 7 hours (10%) to more than 42 hours (also 10%) with the largest group of gamers (35%) playing 15–27 hours a week. Within this group, 16% of the participants were playing “professionally,” meaning they participate in competitions with prize money. Note, 79% of gamers in this study preferred to a single game genre at a time.

Now, this is cool, but I doubt 16% of all gamers are playing professionally. I’m not sure if the genre number’s true either, since just looking at the writers here at MOP, I know people play several sub-genres of MMOs and even our site covers “barely related” online games because people have a variety of tastes. Still, it’s good to have some of these numbers, especially in a large sample size like this.

Now, this part of the study got interesting. Among online female gamers, MMOFPS games with the lowest, with only about 1% playing them, while 15%-30% played MMORPGs. MMOFPS players were the youngest (18–19.8 years), MMORTS players were usually around 22, and MMORPG players tended to be the oldest (21–27). Again, the sample doesn’t exactly line up with numbers I remember from other research, but the general findings (that MMORPG players tend to be older than MMOFPS and MMORTS players) seem valid.

From there, about half the MMORPG players were employed full time, about 22% were students, and about 15% were homemakers (about 90% of those female). While females were represented in the study, males clearly made up a larger percentage of the group, so it’s assumed that young males are probably the most “at risk” for gaming addiction. It’s suggested that university students may be the most at risk for addiction due to their flexible schedules and good access to high-speed internet connections, as well as the fact that they are adjusting to new social situations and are often removed from their home life for the first time.

However, just from college orientation, we all know there are other addictions to worry about. I didn’t receive a lecture on the dangers of internet addiction at either my junior college or university, but I did get the alcohol one both times. That’s an addiction that’s much easier to identify. After all, no one says, “Dude, I think you’re addicted to parties.” Perhaps rather than the setting, we should look at the delivery of the content, and based on the severity of the results, be able to conclude whether they’re caused by the games themselves or the online portion of them (after all, we still have local multiplayer!).

cartel_box

Addicted to games or the internet?

Are online games innately addictive, or is their connection to the internet the source the addiction, assuming there’s an addiction at all? It’s even been suggested that those who focus on online addiction research should be broadening their research to the internet at large, since it’s one of the providers in shopping, gambling, and porn addiction. It’s even been suggested that a “problematic internet use” be researched and included in the Manual of Mental Disorders. Technically, video game addiction is separated from online gaming addiction, but as of 2013, even general gaming isn’t included.

You could argue that the internet provides situation specific characteristics that can make activities, including online gaming, addictive. Unfortunately, Griffiths’ chapter doesn’t directly tackle what the addiction may be, but another chapter indirectly hints at it: easy access to “pleasure.” As I’ll talk about in a future article, one thing that both the internet and online games can provide people with is an audience. When you do something alone, its meaning feels limited, but when you can share it with others, it feels more significant. Using the internet specifically so that your activities at least seem significant can be pretty rewarding. I’d guess that’s why people will tweet about, say, their breakfast. I usually discuss breakfast only with language students to help them learn unless I (admittedly) want to brag about what I ate or if I realize I forgot to eat it.

However, it’s possible that people aren’t so much addicted to the internet as to their activities on the internet. This would mean there’s possibly a difference between having an addiction to the internet or one on it. To test this, one could potentially use the original six features and simply check how they relate with online vs. offline gaming.

Disconnecting

“Video game addiction’s biggest hurdle is that it’s literally a first world problem.”
Ultimately, video game addiction’s biggest hurdle is that it’s literally a first world problem. The field is just coming into its own, but game addiction, online or off, is so nebulous that professionals in the truest sense of the word still haven’t officially classified it as a real problem in and of itself. MMO players are a pretty diverse bunch, but it seems that the most diverse group, the MMORPG fans, are also potentially the most vulnerable to addiction. It’s important to note, though, that there are parts of games that can be addictive (curse you, random lockboxes!), and those are what can be treated. In fact, it may not even be MMOs that are addictive but something about their connection to the internet that has something to do with it.

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33 Comments on "Exploring ‘The Video Game Debate’: Online games and internet addiction"

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ntellect
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ntellect

I’m addicted to media. And I see gaming as just an interactive form of that.  I never looked at it as an addiction per se, but more of a passion. I just happen to love when something visual moves me.  It inspires me. So I could never see it as bad. I define addiction as abusing the thing you love for a short term gain.  That can destroy a person.  

Addictions by themselves aren’t bad.

Wandris
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Wandris

Games in themselves are no more addictive than TV, sweet foods, marijuana, spending money etc. However the lines between online gaming and gambling are becoming more blurred as time goes on. There are elements in cash shops no different than a slot machine(some games don’t even try to disguise it anymore), and like gambling there are those who will inevitably end up getting sucked in and unable to control the time, money and life they put into it. If someone spends a great deal of time gaming over other more sociable activities it is an escape, and people only need such escape when they have some sort of deficiency or problem in there offline lives. Im not saying there is anything wrong with that aside from spending that many hours sitting is not good for your physical wellness. Out of all the potential escapes a person can take online gaming is one of the better ones, simply because you are usually engaging your brain/attention and potentially socializing too.

breetoplay
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breetoplay

Denngar Armsbend Usage is definitely dated at this point for sure. The idea of not including Japan, SK, HK etc. as FWCs is absurd in 2015 imo.

redtoadsage
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redtoadsage

Also to keep in mind is “internet gaming disorder” is NOT an official disorder in the DSM-5….and if you do ANY digging on the DSM-5 you will find out just how much they have grown fond of pathologizing normal behavior. In going from the DSM-IV-TR to the DSM-5, they dropped the exclusion of bereavement, which is the normal sense of depression felt after the death of a loved one from the criteria that would exempt someone from meeting the classification for a Major Depressive Disorder. They have over pathologized to the point psychiatrists who once sat on the committee that formed the DSM-IV-TR have openly criticized the DSM-5 for creating too many new disorders with not enough research to back that. 

Despite ALL THAT, and despite rejecting internet gaming outright in previous editions, Internet Gaming Disorder is STILL not official, and is classified in the section that *even in the new and crazy DSM* says it needs to be studied further before being taken seriously. 

If that doesn’t speak volumes I don’t know what else there is to say.

redtoadsage
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redtoadsage

As far as addictions go, there is no basis for video game addiction in by accepted standards. Addictions have classically been classified based on the physiological properties of dependence and withdrawal, neither of which are present in video gaming. The only other example of addiction that isn’t based on psychological symptoms is gambling addiction, which has a unique behavioral pattern also not present in video gaming.

In my personal opinion, this is all just a fad that people use to prey on the fear of parents for financial gain. Similar to the social fears that television, and rock and roll were going to damage the youth. It feels like a shameless tactic that uses pseudoscience to push therapy that people don’t really need. 

Of all the studies I have read, the general conclusion was that spending tons of time playing games was likely the reaction, or way of coping with another problem (like having poor access or means of socializing with peers, or social anxiety) than a disorder in it’s own right.

PurpleCopper
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PurpleCopper

The only thing more addictive than this is wearing a VR set that simulates a MMO game where you use drugs to win the game.

korsobar
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korsobar

I just read an article summarizing research that found pizza was the most addictive food due to an element in cheese that triggers a dopamine reaction.  So cheese could be as addictive as some drugs.  But so what?  I think we should only consider someone to be addicted when they want to stop but they can’t.  In that way, I was addicted to smoking.  I am not addicted to games because I don’t want to stop.

AlexSmithWI
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AlexSmithWI

I would consider lockboxes more of gambling problem than internet or gaming one :P.

CloakingDonkey
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CloakingDonkey

As someone who has been “addicted” to video games before and has also had an ACTUAL substance addiction, I always tend to heartily chuckle at this video game addiction nonsense.

I played DAoC nonstop for about a year, dropped out of school, stopped socializing outside of the game, etc etc. All the hallmarks of an addiction and yet at some point I just stopped and moved on with my life. No cold sweats, no cravings, no nail biting, nothing and I “use” the “substance” regularly ever since without losing control. Video game abuse is a choice. It’s not something that you are mentally or physically compelled to do.

Calling it addiction just cheapens actual cases of addiction. Anecdotal evidence? Sure. Then again I have yet to actually see a longitudinal study that proves there is such a thing as video game addiction as defined by the COMMON use of the word addiction. Until then I will treat this with the same eye rolling as the “ADHD epidemic”…

Vikaernes
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Vikaernes

http://motherboard.vice.com/read/life-offline?utm_source=mbtwitter
Some food for thought, on the topic of internet addiction, and a fantastic article.

MdoubleP
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MdoubleP

I was addicted to EQ for a time and WoW as well. I think MMORPGs by their very nature are designed to be addictive.

A Dad Supreme
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A Dad Supreme

I think this pic is more a commentary on gamers waiting (for the perfect MMO) rather than playing too long.

melissaheather
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melissaheather

Personalities are definitely the driving factor, i tend to lose myself in things, be they relationships, video games, workout routines, diets, CDs of glorious euro-metal… binge-watching Game of Thrones, whatever.    So yeah.   I think it’s all a personality type, people who are pre-disposed to such activities that are the ones ya gotta watch.  ;-)

Denngar
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Denngar

BalsBigBrother Gaming AND internet addiction aren’t even real terms in the official book for diagnosing mental disorders. It may be a “thing,” but it’s culture bound, generally in first world countries.

schlag sweetleaf
Guest
schlag sweetleaf

Where does meme addiction fit in?

camelotcrusade
Guest
camelotcrusade

Great article.  I especially loved your point that nobody says “Dude, I think you’re addicted to parties!”  People who don’t understand a hobby tend to see it as one dimensional and then start inventing details about its influences or impact.
For example, I don’t care about sports so when I see people who obviously make it a passion or hobby it’s easy to assume that’s all they do or care about.  And when you start thinking about it that way, it could lead to assumptions that they’re “obsessed,” that they are imbalanced (are they the ones who go out and riot when their teams win/lose?) etc.  Of course, since sports is a culturally accepted obsession we typically defend  it rather than judge too harshly (and we wouldn’t call it an obsession, either).

Not so with gaming, and I’ve seen plenty of people follow the same path I outlined above, and without any cultural protections to derail hysterical thinking.

Denngar
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Denngar

Armsbend I didn’t think you were, just pointed out that the link you used actually lists several asian countries in addition to saying the word you wanted to argue doesn’t have a hard definition, plus suggested a reason why the editors allowed an anecdote with research.

Armsbend
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Armsbend

Denngar I wasn’t knocking the article – I thought it was a great read – just some things I noticed in it.

Damonvile
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Damonvile

I’m addicted to gaming but I’ve never seen it as a problem. It’s just something I have to manage and balance with the rest of my life. But as far as addictions go…it’s a pretty good one.

I’m going to be addicted to something. That’s just the way I am. My interests are all or nothing. It’s the only thing I really want to do in my spare time or I just lose interest and stop doing it. Gaming works really well for me, as long as I remember to stay connected to the outside world.

That’s the real problem I think a lot of research overlooks. They talk about breaking addictions and treating them but what happens to people once they do break it ? normally they seem to find something else.

Denngar
Guest
Denngar

Armsbend Some good points, but you may want to reread that:
“Today, the First World is slightly outdated and has no official definition, however, it is generally thought of as the capitalist, industrial, wealthy and developed countries. This definition included most of the countries of https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/North_America, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Western_Europe, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Australasia and https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japan.”
” It can be defined succinctly as Europe, plus the richer countries of the former British Empire (USA, Canada, Australia, Singapore, New Zealand, South Africa), Japan, and South Korea.”
“The U.S.-aligned countries included:https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/First_World#cite_note-3https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Israel, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japan, the https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philippines, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/South_Korea and https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Taiwan.”
So yeah, asia does count.

Also, anecdotes are a general tool used to break down complex ideas for the masses. This is a scientific related article on a very unscientific site. There probably needs to be a bit of a balance to make sure more readers can appreciate the article.

Sorenthaz
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Sorenthaz

SkyyDragonn I mean there’s definitely a withdrawal factor that can happen if you suddenly pull the Internet away from someone.  Or maybe it’s more of a culture shock?  *shrug*  But yeah the Internet is becoming a necessity as well as the best source of entertainment.  It’s the next step up from TV which was a step up from the radio which was a step up from theater and so on.  It’s a cultural evolution/progression that’s been going on for quite some time, and people who fall behind are always the ones to gripe about the generational lifestyle changes.

Sorenthaz
Guest
Sorenthaz

I think in general it’s more about online addiction than anything.  But even that’s a bit too conclusion jumpy because people who spend more time online might be doing it for various reasons.  I.e. if they don’t have much of a social life and aren’t social people to begin with, they might find more enjoyment spending their time online.   Also there’s so much stuff accessible on the Internet beyond bad stuff like porn or whatever.  Like anything that’s watchable on TV is stuff that I can watch online in some way/shape/form.   Not to mention there’s stuff like Youtube where people will do entire series of stuff with a variety of topics/content, and there are discussion forums aplenty with sites like Reddit, and there are of course plenty of online social things like Facebook, Twitter, Skype, and online games.   And I can also read books online or read up on wikis and so on.  There’s soooo much information and stuff to do on the Internet that it’s insane.   We get so much easier access to pretty much everything that isn’t physical.  
Overall, I think the only real strong argument for Internet/gaming addiction is the fact that the Internet provides an escape from reality and gives easy-to-access relief and satisfaction from a variety of sources which can definitely grow addicting.   Like there are people who get thrills out of living a second (or multiple) lives online because they feel like they’re no longer chained to the rules and limitations of the real world.
At the end of the day though the Internet has become necessary for everyone to use, and it’s super convenient too.  It’s only really seen as a bad thing by older generations who remember a time before the Internet became a vital part of everyone’s day-to-day life.   Who knows, in another decade maybe it won’t be looked down upon if you’re spending more time on the Internet than doing other stuff outside of your job (assuming that isn’t online either).

MorpayneRADIO
Guest
MorpayneRADIO

I’m with you on this one. It might be because of my age ( genX ) but my no one in my social circles games, my family considers it completely childish and for most of my past romantic relationships, it was always better left out of the conversation….

SkyyDragonn
Guest
SkyyDragonn

The whole idea of “internet addiction” is stupid given that in today’s society the internet is integral to being social, professionally successful. Not to mention it is the “go to” for entertainment for a growing portion of millennials. Is it possible to be addicted to something that is practically required for daily living?

Armsbend
Guest
Armsbend

Quincha I enjoyed his personal story – but take someone like me – who has no friends who play video games and largely still look at them through jock vs. nerd glasses – it is vastly different from someone who has a large social circle of people who game a lot.

I have to be ostracized from social situations to even take part in gaming.  I know people think I’m a froot loop because of my hobby.

/shrug – just a passing point

Armsbend
Guest
Armsbend

Andrew I’m not sure you guys should use yourselves as an example (under the ‘Debating addiction’ section).  You make a living from the gaming experience and from most of my reading over many years the majority of gaming writers seem to be in emotional relationships with other gamers.

I think when you are in a circle of acceptance it is difficult to see gaming as harmful in any way.

I have to be a writing police here for a second: “video game addiction’s biggest hurdle is that it’s literally a first world problem.”  Literally, none of Asia is considered the first world by any definition.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/First_World

That said, excellent write up.  Would you suggest the book to someone who takes a large interest in the psychology of your average gamer – but one who doesn’t want to read a college textbook?

paragonlostinspace
Guest
paragonlostinspace

BKone American phrase, interchangeable with going to the theatre. I’m going to the movies tonight to see the “Back to the Future” movies playing back to back, for example.

paragonlostinspace
Guest
paragonlostinspace

I like to simplify things. Basically it comes down to that there are addictions of the body. Things your body tells you it needs, nicotine, heroin, opioids etc. Where when you don’t have them your body does terrible things. Then there are addictions of the mind. Where your mind gets rewarded for doing something. Serotonin squirting into the brain saying “yum I like that”. Sex, eating, sports, gaming etc.

Then there is the third factor, the human one. Some people are more prone to addictive activities and have less self control. Making the first two factors I listed as having more of an potential impact. Making it harder to break or control how much of something you or or how often you do it. Anything done in great of quantities can be bad for you, whether it’s gaming, exercise or sex. (shrugs)

 In my opinion it just feels like that they complicate so many of these issues by trying to make them each “different” in cause when honestly it does feel more simpler than that. That they’re muddying up the waters instead of shining a clear light on these mental and physical issues. Which gets in the way of helping those who need it.

 It took me years to break cigarette/cigar smoking. I smoked two plus packs a day for many years and also had my share of cigar which I loved even more than the cigarettes. I kept trying to quit and kept failing. I didn’t like how I felt when once I actually quit. I got the nicotine out of my system and I hated what I referred to as “the dumbs”, I was worried that I’d never think clearly again, that I felt less sharp. 

 The last time I attempted to quit it finally stuck. I went through the whole process and finally after a few months I finally felt like I wasn’t suffering from “the dumbs” anymore. Though I seriously worried that I’d never feel sharp again. What kept me from smoking again though in the end was realizing that I could never have another cigar or cigarette, that if I did I’d smoke again and be hooked. It was the one serious error that I made in past attempts to quit.

 Anyhow, I might be overly simplifying things in the first couple paragraphs but I feel that the medical associations aren’t helping that they are hindering things and making it more complex than it needs to be.  So these studies while interesting still have roots that really are already covered by addiction as it stands. Remember when people first started really talking about “sex addiction”, like it was special or different from other forms of addiction. The root is the root, an addictive personality that gets rewarded from an activity. It didn’t need to be treated differently than say addiction to exercise for example. The gaming addiction is the same sort of thing in my mind.

Samizdat
Guest
Samizdat

BKone “Going to the movies” is a pretty common colloquial phrase. At least ’round these parts.

BKone
Guest
BKone

“going to the movies”? 
Isn’t it going to the cinema to watch movies?
I’m not native english speaker so I’m curious… (that would be going to the film theater to watch films in my native language.)

BalsBigBrother
Guest
BalsBigBrother

agemyth would you mind providing a TL:DR for those of us with a short atten ….. <blinks> um … what was I saying?  <wonders off with a puzzled frown on face>

:-P

JayPower
Guest
JayPower

I obviously have too much time on my hands here at work. One thing I want to point out is the sample size of this study is too small to form any real conclusions from IMO. Four thousand peeps is nothing in a county of 320 million. So I disagree with calling that a “large study”. It is an interesting read though and gives us a little insight into gaming addiction. Myself, am a complete addict and have an addictive personality so MMORPGs are my current fix. For a while I was addicted to the gym and fitness. For a while I was addicted to drinking and partying. For a while I was addicted to smoking maryjane and watching netflix. For people like me, if it’s not one thing, it’s another. 
I actually stuck to console games and single player games for a good twenty years. I avoided WoW even though I wanted to play it because I knew about how addictive MMORPGs were. Then I was unemployed and living in a hostile environment and my MMORPG addiction began. I came across Star Trek online and thought well it’s free and it’s Star Trek let me try it out. Within a couple months I was spending hundreds of $ every week, playing 30-40 hours a week, and deeply invested. I went cold turkey and sold my blinged out char for cheap on Player Auctions. But I’m still chasing that dragon!

agemyth
Guest
agemyth

I just read all of that. Hooray for longer for Massively content!

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