Perfect Ten: How to play MMOs on a limited time budget

One of the most frequent questions I’m ever asked here at Massively OP or on my own blog is, “How do you do it? How do you play all these games while handling a job and family?” Obviously the solution is experimental military-grade medication that’s kept me from sleeping since 2011. Another popular theory is that I’m one of a batch of clones that time-share my life.

The truth is that I don’t have any more time than anyone else and have had to organize my life and game smartly. It’s not like back when I was a bachelor and could play games for three days straight; now I have a wife, four kids, and way too many things that are always vying for my attention.

But I love to play MMOs, and along with writing, I see it as my hobby. So I’ve figured out little ways to make gaming work on a limited time budget, and if you’re in a similar situation and feel torn between wanting to play MMOs and feeling like you don’t have the time to do it, I wanted to share what I’ve learned with you.

1. Everyone’s living situation and schedule is different

I guess the first thing we need to set out is that no two people’s living situations are the same. Some of us have more free time than others, some have more flexible work hours, some have more understanding family members. In coming up with a plan to handle MMOs with your life, you can’t carbon-copy what someone else has done because other people have variables in play that are different than yours.

So the first step is to examine your current schedule and living situation and see how you spend your time already, where you’re wasting your moments doing nothing particularly productive or fun, and what you would like to change.

2. Keep your priorities straight

I had a friend who was neck-deep in MMOs with his wife for years until he realized that he had let his interest in gaming get a little too big that it was negatively impacting their relationship, his health, and his quality time with his daughter. He chose to quit gaming and focus on other things, which I respect. Again, everyone’s situation is different and he knew he was more prone to getting sucked in than others.

For me, I have to constantly remind myself to keep my priorities in life absolutely straight. Gaming is almost always dead-last in my hierarchy of activities, topped by work, then household chores, then personal maintenance, then family and faith. Family time is sacred; the only time I game in the evening is when I can do so with a kid sharing the experience, and even then it’s only for a few minutes. If I haven’t gotten a project done that needs doing, it gets done first, even if that means I have to give up gaming that day. And if I’m exhausted, I’ll often choose to forego MMOs for an extra hour or two of sleep.

3. Learn to love 30-minute sessions

It used to be that I bought into the philosophy that MMO gaming meant that you needed to plunk down in a chair for hours at a time to do anything meaningful or get anywhere important. Years of gaming have since taught me that this is a lie. Little gaming sessions add up and get you to the same finish line as others, albeit at a slower pace.

So I’ve gravitated to embracing half-hour play sessions as a standard unit of time in which I can get something done in an MMO. A half-hour is enough to run a dungeon (usually). A half-hour can see a few quests through. A half-hour is some crafting and socializing with friends. I don’t always play for only a half-hour, but I feel like that’s about the minimum needed to start doing something in-game. If I’m trying to juggle multiple MMOs (and I often am), two hours can equal hopping around to four titles for those 30 minutes apiece.

4. Develop and hold to clear, concise goals when going into a gaming session

Listen, if you only have a little bit of time to game during the day (or even the week), then that time is precious and you cannot afford to waste it. Make it count. Make it something that you can look back on and feel as though you accomplished something or had a great experience.

It used to be that I would log in and do whatever, kind of drift along at whatever struck my fancy. I still do this if I end up with a few hours to game on a rare day, but more often than not, I’ll come up with a clear goal to aim for as I’m logging into the game. Maybe I want to play through a few quests and write them up for my blog. The second I’m in, I’m gunning right to do that. Even if my goal is “fart around doing some housing,” that’s what I’m going to do during that time and be happy for it.

5. Get past this rat race mentality

For some people, racing to the top of MMOs, being the best of the best, and pouring barrels of time into these games is something they both enjoy and have the luxury to do. But everyone who only has a few hours to game every week knows all too well the weird envious pangs that come with seeing the rest of the crowd shoot past you and live it up in endgame heaven while you’re toiling around in the midgame.

I say this is perfectly fine. I say get over the strange and counter-productive urge to be right alongside the rest of the pack. Enjoy and savor the game as it comes. Do it at your own pace. And if playing with friends who are at higher levels is important to you, then form a leveling pact or pick MMOs with sidekicking or level syncing systems that take away that pressure to progress quickly.

6. Invest time into finding a guild that fits your personality and playstyle

I can think of fewer things as important as finding a good guild match to keep you interested and encouraged in MMOs. If you’ve got only a few hours to play a week, logging in to silence or strangers is only going to make you feel more alienated and detached. Instead, make it a priority to find a guild that welcomes and includes time-strapped players. I’ve found many of them in my journeys and they’ve done so much to encourage me by showing me that there are a lot of other folks out there with kids, jobs, classes, little time, and a big desire to still game.

7. Acknowledge that, no, you won’t be able to do everything in an MMO

Here’s the thing about time: It’s a zero-sum game. You get 24 hours a day, the same as everyone else, and all you can decide is how to spend it. If you are unwilling or unable to sacrifice other time-gobblers to invest into MMOs, then you’re going to have to come to terms with the fact that you won’t be able to do everything in MMOs.

You probably won’t be a raider. You probably won’t be the best at everything or have all of the best gear. You definitely won’t be on the cutting edge of new content and tearing up betas left and right. MMOs are designed to have incredible time sinks for players who want to do nothing but play, but I’ve realized that none of those time sinks is mandatory. Don’t let the game dictate how you play — you set the rules. You decide what’s feasible and what is simply out of reach. And once you decide that, be satisfied with how you play.

8. Don’t be ashamed of taking time to game

I’ve had to make a choice in my life what hobbies I would pursue and what I would need to forgo. And since MMOs are a hobby I’m going to keep — because they’re awesome — then I’m not going to apologize of enjoying them.

I’m not saying here that gaming is somehow shameful; we’re far past that in modern pop culture. But I’ve noticed that players with limited time somehow feel guilty for playing at all. I mean, there’s always something “serious” that needs doing, but you know what else is serious? Stress relief. Hobbies (and gaming) provide that. Playing MMOs at the end of the day are how I unwind before bed and are sorely needed after the struggles and complexities of the day.

9. Keep track of your progress

Sometimes when you game infrequently or for only little bits at a time, you can feel like you’re spinning your wheels without getting anywhere. But I’m willing to bet that if you can look at how far you’ve come, you’ll see that progress is being made — and you’ll be happier and more satisfied because of it.

There are many ways to do this, including a gaming journal or spreadsheet (seriously) in which you list your accomplishments and stated goals. Some of us blog as ways to record our adventures and provide a written milestone on which we can look back and marvel at how much of a noob we used to be. Even screenshotting through your adventures could have this effect.

10. Find little ways to get your MMO fix when you can’t game

Like any hobby, MMOs have the actual activity and then the surrounding meta. When you can’t get your gaming fix, there’s still some ways to stay plugged into the MMO world. There are podcasts, blogs, news sites (like MOP), Twitter conversations, video casts, developer posts, forums, comments, and even spin-off media like books and mobile apps. Sometimes I’ll find informative posts and guides about games I’m playing and will save those documents to my phone to read when I have a few minutes here or there.

I hope this helps some of you who, like me, count the few hours of gaming every week as a treasure and are looking to get the most out of them.

Everyone likes a good list, and we are no different! Perfect Ten takes an MMO topic and divvies it up into 10 delicious, entertaining, and often informative segments for your snacking pleasure. Got a good idea for a list? Email us at justin@massivelyop.com or eliot@massivelyop.com with the subject line “Perfect Ten.”
SHARE THIS ARTICLE
Code of Conduct | Edit Your Profile | Commenting FAQ | Badge Reclamation | Badge Key

LEAVE A COMMENT

40 Comments on "Perfect Ten: How to play MMOs on a limited time budget"

Subscribe to:
Sort by:   newest | oldest | most liked
Defector1980
Guest
Defector1980

I enjoyed these suggestions. With wife, full time job, and a 7 month old, I can use some tips!

dbresson
Guest
dbresson

Castle117 Actually wish this were Reddit atm so I could downvote this.

shaw sbst
Guest
shaw sbst

DugFromTheEarth shaw sbst Of course I have time budget, since I cannt play when I want, but when I can. The difference strives in the fact that I don’t use my limited time to play games as if it were a job. I don’t seek to accomplish the most in my play time, I just seek to accomplish what I can in an amusing and fun manner. FF14 puts things for you to do on your playing time. He’s (and neither should you) not expecting you clear them in the fastest way possible.

alexjwillis
Guest
alexjwillis

There are some pretty silly comments on this article about “avoiding MMOs” if you have time constraints. Kind of like saying you should avoid reading War and Peace if you only have a limited reading time. 

Raiding =/= MMOing. I was a very successful EVE Online player for several years and I was getting at most an hour a day, every other day, in. A well-designed MMO can cater to multiple playstyles. I’m not saying EVE was in that category, but it’s ludicrous to claim that an entire genre is excluded to you because you don’t fit a narrow definition of required activity levels.

alexjwillis
Guest
alexjwillis

Castle117 Wow, epeen much? I bow to your hardcore.

DugFromTheEarth
Guest
DugFromTheEarth

shaw sbst DugFromTheEarth

If you dont care about how long it takes to accomplish things, then you dont really have a time budget. Time to play may be more spaced out for you, but if it doesnt matter HOW you spend your time, or how long things take, then the concept of budgeting what you do in game is irrelevant. A time budget is based around how much you can accomplish within a limited time period, and in FF14, the answer is: Not a lot.

Typically, those with limited time to play a game, want to accomplish as many goals of theirs that they can in a game, with the limited time they have. In these situations, FF14 is not a good game to try to accomplish this.

Its great that you have no deadlines for when you need to have things accomplished. I play many games that way, at my own pace, spaced out as long as I want over as big of a time period as I want. It helps keep some games fun, rather than turning them into jobs.

shaw sbst
Guest
shaw sbst

DugFromTheEarth shaw sbst I think you are misunderstanding my limited time to play, with some ideal that I need things to take less time to accomplish. I don’t give a damn about how much time things get to take in order to accomplish them in FFXIV. I just sit down, do what I can, and return to resume where I left, and do some more.

If you have limited time to play, and you don’t want to take time doing things, then I can list you a lot of single player and FPS games that will cut all that sweet time I enjoy playing in MMOs, and get you right into the grinder, like you want.

DugFromTheEarth
Guest
DugFromTheEarth

shaw sbst DugFromTheEarth You must not have much to compare FF14 to.

FF14 is one of the WORST games to casually play. *Unless you spend the majority of your time in game standing around being social and roleplaying (which is fine, and FF14 supports this more than many other mmorpgs).

However, the rest of the games gameplay is so anti-casual that its enough to rip your hair out.

The amount of time you have to spend going from A to B to C back to A and then to B again in this game is just INSANE. And these arent short trips either. You wont get a mount until 20 at the earliest, and even then, mounts only have one speed… lumbering. Lumbering is faster than crawling though, which is the speed of normal walking.

Then there is the “Its a single player game, no, its a multiplayer game, no its a single player game!” bouncing the game does. You are happily plodding along doing your quests and then BAM, you run into a dead end on a quest until you can get a group to complete it. More time you will be spending that “casually playing” doesnt have to waste.

Then there is the multiple class element. Yeah, its awesome that you can be ALL the classes on one character. But wait! You have to level up each class from level 1, and any quests you have already done, you cant do again for xp. This means each NEW class you try to level up, relies on grinding non-quest content. Means waiting in dungeon queues, or… wait for it… RUNNING around from Fate to Fate grinding XP. There are also class hunts, which also require you to… thats right… RUN around from zone to zone to kill specific enemies.

FF14 is a game intentionally designed to take up your time. LOTS of your time. Its a subscription game, They WANT you to feel like you need to sub to the game for more than 2 months. Every element of the game outside of being social requires you to spend a LOT of time. This article is about playing a game with a limited time budget… which means… FF14 is really NOT the game you should be playing if your time is limited*

shaw sbst
Guest
shaw sbst

Castle117 Stupidest thing I’ve ever read on this site. Yes, because raiding is the be-all, end-all of an MMO. LOL!

shaw sbst
Guest
shaw sbst

Cirventhor  MMOs are excellent games when you have a limited time to play because of their continuity. When I play a session of FFXIV, everytime I log out, I know exactly where I left, and what it is the thing I will return to be doing when I log in again, or I have a great portfolio of other things to do, full knowingly that each thing I decide to do, will have an impact on my character in a positive way. Playing scattered, single-player games, makes me feel like drinking beer, tossing the can, and grabbing the next one. There’s no sense of forward development or time investment upon my character.

shaw sbst
Guest
shaw sbst

hardy83 Another stupid comment. If you are mature enough, know you have a limited time budget, and still love MMORPGs…play at your own pace, and forget about the rest.
To a mature person, that knows the mechanics of MMOs, they know that you play on a time investment, in order to get an eventual reward.

shaw sbst
Guest
shaw sbst

DugFromTheEarth That’s stupid. Precisely THAT game is the best one to adjust to all the points written by the author. The game gives me a lot of flexibility to work around my limited time, and feellike I accomplished something in every play session.

ZenDadaist
Guest
ZenDadaist

I use downtime at work to go research and prep for stuff I want to get done in game so when I can log in, I’ve got my gametime mapped out. It’s when I do most of the heavy lifting on my maths for the games which have a lot of spreadsheets involved. What’s one more excel file with a bunch of numbers in boxes? :p
Modern MMOs (and older ones with updates) have shorter activities you can complete in quicker timeframes to go along with the settling in for 2-3 hours knocking away at a raid or farming some resources or whatever.
I don’t touch ‘pay to not play’ cash shop stuff though.

Castle117
Guest
Castle117

boring article. the real consideration is how to define your play mode, casual, core, or hardcore. time is only a consideration if you plan to raid or are playing one of the older MMOs like Everquest.  

if you cant, a few times a week, sit down for 2-3 hour sessions, DONT PLAY AN MMO!

Apollymi
Guest
Apollymi

Nice article.  Numbers 5 and 7 are biggies for me.  Once I realized that I was never gonna keep up with the rest of the server, I really started enjoying the games more.  The same with acknowledging I was never gonna raid or pvp.  Those things are just too stressful and are not fun in any way for me.  And its ok.

Cirventhor
Guest
Cirventhor

Honestly I’d say that MMOs are not the best genre when time-constrained. I get more enjoyment out of 30-min sessions with single-player games that are easier to pick up and leave than with MMOs. In my opinion MMOs requires significant time investment (30+ hours pr. week) to be worth it.

Perhaps the main reason I’m doing most of my gaming playing single player games or coop games on consoles these days.

mysecretid
Guest
mysecretid

FOUR kids??? You’ve obviously been able to schedule time for the bow-chikka-wow-wow as well! :-)

(I have a lot of class — it’s all third)

SnipenFarter
Guest
SnipenFarter

hardy83 I thought ‘MMO-ish single player games’ are called an RPG?

direpath
Guest
direpath

Polyanna  That would blow up in my face. My wife is way to OCD completionist for MMOs to be a healthy choice. I’ll let her dominate the tablet/phone game spectrum of the family and crush my candy, while I remain king of my digital domain.

direpath
Guest
direpath

ProfessionalNoob  <insert angry tirade from sarcasm-deficient mouth breather>

confectionally
Guest
confectionally

Finding a good guild is the hardest part.  Just when I think maybe I’ve run across a group of compatible people who don’t mind that my time is occasionally limited, someone will say something hugely assholish and it’ll rapidly become apparent that a large swath of the guild agrees with them.  This has happened to me time and again.  Even if I manage to miraculously avoid the sexists, the racists, and the homophobic types, that still leaves the hugely rude/dramatic/entitled and nasty types of people
The “finding a decent guild” minigame within the game became so exhausting and fun-destroying that I just gave up trying.

Polyanna
Guest
Polyanna

The Fourth Rule of MMO Club is, only one account per game. The Fifth Rule: One game at a time.

TimothyTierless
Guest
TimothyTierless

Playing, enjoying, and winning are all things that have changed greatly in my many years living in MMORPGs. As I age I find myself, my goals and my ideals changing substantially. I think the trick is to look at what you can do in a MMO that you enjoy, look at how much time you have and maximize your minutes to do the things that make you happy while not worrying about any degrees of “success”. Finding happiness is the most successful thing anyone can achieve. Maybe thats a metaphor for life? Or maybe its just something Rafiki said, or was it Yoda? /shrug

Estranged
Guest
Estranged

Great stuff.  

I believe the most common issue with MMO players is we often are completionists to a fault.  Very sound advice about it being OK to not accomplish every goal in a game.

Nogroson
Guest
Nogroson

Great article and some interesting tips. Thank you

Sigbjorn
Guest
Sigbjorn

Yeah, I was in my senior year of high school when FFXI came out. I quickly realized there was no way to get anything serious done on a school night.

melissaheather
Guest
melissaheather

Yes, can’t contribute anything other than to say ‘good article’.

Denice J Cook
Guest
Denice J Cook

Great article!  Thanks, Justin!

….

Four kids, eek!

schmidtcapela
Guest
schmidtcapela

30-minutes sessions: I tend to treat 30 minutes as the largest amount of time I can set out for gaming at a time. Anything that can’t be done in 30-minutes chunks, I don’t even bother with, and depending on how important I consider to be doing that content in the game its very existence might make me abandon the game.

“Listen, if you only have a little bit of time to game during the day (or
even the week), then that time is precious and you cannot afford to
waste it.” : yep, I heartily agree. It’s why I won’t stand anymore for the little tricks devs use to make players waste time, such as long travel time. A dev tries to waste my time in a game, I will be throwing the game out instead.

Acknowledge that, no, you won’t be able to do everything in an MMO: I do this a bit differently. If there is anything in the game that, due to the way I play, will be out of my reach, and if I truly consider obtaining it to be important, chances are good I will instead just leave the game, or not start playing it in the first place. Why should I settle for (and waste money on) a game that, whether intentionally or unwittingly, frustrates me by keeping something I truly desire just out of my reach? It is, even, a large part of why I don’t return to WoW: I dislike raiding and don’t want to ever raid again, but WoW tries so hard to push players into raiding that it makes me feel like a second class player if I don’t raid.

Grimmtooth
Guest
Grimmtooth

10. Like commenting on blogsites like MOP (which is what I’m down to at the moment)

209vaughn
Guest
209vaughn

I have plenty of time to game and I still dont like to race through.  I like my mmorpg’s to be little virtual worlds, rather than just combat.

Fair More
Guest
Fair More

I enjoyed this alot. Thank you.

hardy83
Guest
hardy83

If you have a limited time budget, it’s best to avoid the entire genre.

It’s better to play smaller indie games or MMO-ish single player games.

Not like you’ll really miss anything. If you cut out the grinds in every MMO, there’s probably only bout 5-20 hours of real gameplay. lol

direpath
Guest
direpath

The guild/community is paramount for me. I like the group I am with. We are a faith based group (without being preachy) and we recognize family and life comes first. The downside to this is that when we do want to be competitive or progressive in an MMO, the mission statement of inclusion tends to become conflicted with the needs to demand time commitments and a certain level of gear/dedication to improvement.

We have made it work in the past which is great for those in our community which are driven to excel and conquer in games. Personally, I am not a raider. I like playing at my own pace and grouping with folks when it is needed (by myself or them)

BraxKedren
Guest
BraxKedren

Styopa I’ve thought about trying that game but just looking at it turns me off. I’d rather stick with games I don’t really have to pay a dime in (Swtor and GW2) and be content than try something so outrageous as this game.

blackcat7k
Guest
blackcat7k

ProfessionalNoob

The sad thing is that I see parents actually subjecting their kids to similar devices while they go on at length on the phone.

ProfessionalNoob
Guest
ProfessionalNoob

http://www.amazon.com/Pet-Champion-Large-Cable-90-Pound/dp/B00D9DTKDI/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1453922016&sr=8-1&keywords=yard+tether

Two words. Yard Tethers. 
Works great with kids. Frees up your gaming time. 
Not sayin anything, just sayin.

DugFromTheEarth
Guest
DugFromTheEarth

11. Dont play FF14

Styopa
Guest
Styopa

I was having this conversation the other day, about trying to put my finger on why Boobs&Soul seems so shallow.  One of the points is that I don’t have to pay attention to anything.  
Click-click-click-click quest accept (or more often click-click-click-click-quest accept-click too far, get the ‘I have no dialogue for this’ npc screen-esc to back up), follow the arrow, do whatever needs doing, either run or jump back, click-click-click-click quest complete.
What has made this game eminently accessible in little bits of time has directly left me feeling unconnected and uncaring about the “world” I’m operating in.
Hell, playing in vanilla WoW private servers, where everything’s a lot less obvious…it feels more real, and I feel far more invested, but of course I get less of the “Skinner box reward” hits that I’m used to in 2016.

Armsbend
Guest
Armsbend

Great article.   I found this line a bit off though:

“It used to be that I bought into the philosophy that MMO gaming meant that you needed to plunk down in a chair for hours at a time to do anything meaningful or get anywhere important.”

Only because not that long ago, it wasn’t a philosophy it was game design.

wpDiscuz