WoW Factor: Nostalrius, copyright, and player demand

If you haven't been following the latest Legion testing - which, at the end of the day, is just a series of iterative updates to the experience that we've been dealing with all along - then the big news this week in the World of Warcraft community was the shutdown of the Nostalrius server. Yes, it was another vanilla-only private server, yes, it was player-supported, and yes, it got shut down before it ever went to court. And thus we're knee-deep in another back-and-forth argument about whether or not people want official vanilla servers.

If I have the air of someone who is a wee bit tired of this particular discussion, that's because I am. It's something that has been debated on and off for a long while, ironically dating back to just after The Burning Crusade released, and it's always taken the form of "these illegal servers are popular, so make one legal!" But there's no real way to ignore it, and it deserves a bit of discussion here.

On copyright, trademark, and not being stupid

When companies idolize their pasts, it's usually because their presents are much less interesting.Let's be clear here: Every single private server in existence is a massive copyright violation, and the only reason that these things have not been shut down is either that the company in question doesn't know about it or because said company is willing to turn a blind eye to the project. Blizzard's pulling the lawyers on this one was entirely correct to do so.

There always seems to be a lot of confusion as to where the line gets drawn, so let's make something clear: A copyright violation is using anything that Blizzard has published as official World of Warcraft material without the explicit agreement and licensing of the copyright holder. That includes characters, stories, plots, art assets, and so forth. Fair use is a provision allowing people to do things for educational or contextual purposes, such as parodies and news sites. I can use a picture of Garrosh Hellscream on this article and add a caption, which falls under the header of fair use specifically because I'm talking about WoW and using it as an example. Fair use is also a defense rather than a blanket expression of safety, a tacit admission that something is a copyright violation but used in a positive manner.

For those of you looking to read more about it, I highly recommend the TF Wiki article on copyright, which is far more cleanly and comprehensibly written than you might expect for a fan-run wiki about a bunch of transforming robots. Then again, if I can link to that wiki, I will.

How much money Nostalrius did or didn't make off of the server has literally no bearing on anything; what matters is that the server was making extensive use of works copyrighted by Blizzard. The graphics, quests, music, textures, characters, and plotlines are all under copyright, obviously. One could even argue that it starts to infringe upon trademark, which is a whole other ball of wax. Either Blizzard didn't know about it before or didn't feel the need to act before, but it was always a time bomb. There's no debate to be had here. The works in question were all being used in the original context without any alteration, and that means it was always a ticking time bomb.

Does this prove people want a vanilla server?

No, I don't care, and it's not a productive discussion.

Nostalrius proves that a lot of people will flock to a free server promising a vanilla experience that involves not giving any money to the people involved in making the original game. Making larger statements about whether or not that proves the demand is there relies on making a lot of assumptions that I'm not comfortable with, starting with the assumption that everyone who played on that private server would happily shift over to paying money every month to Activision for the same service.

Even if it does prove that, though - even if you could use this as an unassailable lynchpin of an argument stating that 300,000 players would happily play the vanilla-only server right now - it's not a productive discussion. Blizzard has always had the exact same answer to that request, and that's "no."

Seriously, the company that couldn't give a unified answer about flying through an entire expansion cycle hasn't budged an inch on whether or not vanilla servers will ever arrive. It's a question that has been consistently asked for a long time, it has always received the same answer, and there's no indication that the answer is about to change. Asking about whether or not it proves anything is like spending hours arguing over who farted in the living room: It's time that could be better spent opening a window.

You can long for the earlier days if you want to, and there are legitimate reasons to be unhappy with the direction the game has gone in recent years. It's not a matter I particularly want to comment on or a debate I want to get into, though, and it ultimately doesn't matter when the discussion has been shut down before it can be started.

You can't really go back again.

But what does it mean? And why?

The thing about copyright is that it's enforced by the copyright holder on an at-will basis. We here at Massively Overpowered have copyright on the articles we post, and any time some yahoo decides to cut and paste the whole thing on Reddit, we are fully within our legal rights to throw cease-and-desist orders around. Ditto the many, many times that sites crop up copying everything we do and trying to build their reputations on the back of stolen content. However, whether we do so or not, we still own the copyright; not sending out notices when someone steals our content doesn't in any way diminish our possession of said copyright.

It's unlikely that Blizzard doesn't know about these various operations, but it's understandable that it may not take action against them immediately. Now that we're in a year-long lull of content, however, it seems that Blizzard is bringing the hammer down with a bit more fervor, which raises some justified speculation. The company's ultimate motives can't be known to outside observers, but I wouldn't be surprised if Blizzard's a bit more irritable about copyright at the moment, especially with a movie coming out and the base game itself in an unwelcome state for many players.

And it's here that things become interesting because it speaks to something that the industry may be starting to notice as a whole. WoW, at the moment, has a large portion of people who want to play the game but don't want to play what the game is, preferring snippets that the game has had as major elements in the past but has since abandoned. I would argue there are titles already exploring the field of "WoW without quite so much WoW" as a content delivery model. And the most interesting part of this shutdown is that it indicates to me that Blizzard's approach is not to ask what people want but to shut these things right down when it can.

Unsurprisingly, this doesn't work. And we have a large portion of the gaming population who loved WoW at one point but aren't happy with it now, some of which are willing to go rather far afield to find something with a similar feeling. So what will it all mean in the long run?

I don't know. It's worth keeping an eye on, just the same.

War never changes, but World of Warcraft does, with a decade of history and a huge footprint in the MMORPG industry. Join Eliot Lefebvre each week for a new installment of WoW Factor as he examines the enormous MMO, how it interacts with the larger world of online gaming, and what's new in the worlds of Azeroth and Draenor.
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368 Comments on "WoW Factor: Nostalrius, copyright, and player demand"

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Kass40
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Kass40

There is a demand for a vanilla server, offical or otherwise. Look at SWGemu, it's in the process of being ressurected from the ashes.

I don't see the issue for a company to offer gamers the chance for nostalgia the chance to play the original format of the game. All Blizz needs to do is launch a few servers, with the other servers, charge the monthly fee to allow players to switch between servers at will. At the moment I popped on to WoW to see the pop rates, about 30 eu servers were on low pop lastnight at peak time. 

If blizz was to consider a vanilla server, I am sure players would pay their monthly sub. To be able to play WOW up to even Burning Crusade would be awesome. I know I would not hesitate to sub back.

MyNameIsIllegal
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MyNameIsIllegal

Vagrant Zero carson63000 Loopstah wjowski If they are all paying the sub anyway, and they put a little extra time in to implement the micro (macro honestly) transactions into the older version, what is the difference from an income standpoint?

MyNameIsIllegal
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MyNameIsIllegal

ManastuUtakata MyNameIsIllegal carson63000 Loopstah wjowski Admittedly, I was exaggerating slightly for effect.

schmidtcapela
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schmidtcapela

wjowski Jigawatts Siolenas  
Which is part of the reason I have, for the most part, returned to offline games after spending about a decade playing MMOs almost exclusively.
In an offline game I can, for the most part, relive any previous experience I had with the game, at any time I want, and this isn't just about being able to keep content I like around but also about being able to keep savegames that allow me to jump to any bit of content I might want to see; in a MMO, on the other hand, I'm restricted to content the devs want to make available, played in the way the devs want it to be played (AKA without mods or cheats), and even if the content wasn't removed I often have to roll a new character, and go through a lot of content I'm not interested in, to get to some bit of earlier content I want to play again.

BTW, nowadays, if a MMO changes in such a way it's not to my tastes anymore, I will simply leave it without looking back, regardless of how much time I've previously spent on it or whether I have in-game friends there (I tried before remaining in games I didn't like playing anymore in order to keep in contact with in-game friends, the end result wasn't nice). I might come back if it changes again to something I can find enjoyable, but as the saying goes, once bitten, twice shy.

Siolenas
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Siolenas

The only way I see vanilla coming back is when wow reached its conclusion and the story ends. Then they could reset the game and have it auto play.

Siolenas
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Siolenas

None of those other games evolve over time. Ff6 ends and then you restart. Wow is a living game. Vanilla was beaten and so forth. To offer a vanilla server is counterpreductive. That error is over.

wjowski
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wjowski

Jigawatts 
 That's the price you pay for dynamic content.  Things change, sometimes not to your taste.

Jigawatts
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Jigawatts

If I want to play Final Fantasy 6, I fire it up, if I want to play Ocarina of Time, good times, if I want to play Planescape: Torment, Heroes of Might and Magic 3, or any other of the myriad of classic games in existence, all I have to do is pull up or put in the game and I'm good to go. But if I want to play Vanilla WoW, sorry, unavailable, you cant do that, but not only just that, we are met with a literal "you think you want that but you dont" by the devs themselves.

I havent played your current game since the early part of Cataclysm, Blizzard, I am currently not giving you any money, bring legacy servers online (or revert your current game to being challenging and group focused (regarding all aspects of the game, not solely high end raids)) and I will once again be giving you money.

carson63000
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carson63000

borghive carson63000 I'm not saying anything of the sort and I have not the faintest idea how you got that from my comment.

I'm saying that I believe the cutover from server reputation being important because a bad rep hampered your ability to enjoy the game happened earlier than you believe it did. That I believe that even in WoW's earliest days, the servers were big enough and anonymous enough that this was not a serious factor.

I didn't say anything at all about the actual bad behaviour or what caused it.

schmidtcapela
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schmidtcapela

SallyBowls1 
Companies that have much of their revenue coming from the sale of physical objects, such as toys, tend to be extremely paranoid with trademark protection, sometimes to the point of driving away fans. Hasbro, for example, had to revise how it handled trademark issues after My Little Pony unexpectedly attracted a legion of adult fans, and those fans started creating fanart by the truckload; Hasbro's initial crackdown on unlicensed media threatened to mushroom into an unmitigated PR disaster, but thankfully people inside the company quickly noticed that an abundance of fanart actually drove even more people to their licensed products.

borghive
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borghive

carson63000 borghive So you are saying that human beings have really changed a lot over the last 10 years? That our gaming communities have become more toxic because of player behavior, rather than the games themselves have been unwittingly designed to foster that type of behavior?

schmidtcapela
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schmidtcapela

Lethality DPandaren skoryy 
""""wonky as fuck mechanics"? You mean fun, challenging and skill-based?"""
The "fun" part is reeeeeally subjective. Many people find raiding to be about as fun as herding cats, myself included; after spending a year raiding in WoW, it made me sure I never again want to take part in organized raiding.

By the way, WoW only managed to get more than a tiny fraction of the player base into raiding after it started to "spoon-fed remedial content to players", such as WotLK's "wellfare epics" and the extra-easy LFR version of raids. Before that players that regularly raided were so rare that removing them all wouldn't even make a dent on the subscriber numbers.

... though, on second thought, easier access to raiding might have something to do with WoW's subscriber loss. Or at least with me leaving it. One of the reasons I don't return to WoW is that it not only pushes players towards raiding, it's made raiding easy enough that the devs can reasonably expect everyone to finish the raids at least on LFR. But my issue with raiding was never the difficulty, but rather that I really dislike the whole raiding experience, which is made worse by the fact I can't play DPS (and thus fade into the background) due to finding it too boring.

Or, in other words, had WoW never made me feel like I was expected to raid, I might have stuck with that game instead of leaving.

NoctisGray
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NoctisGray

I liked this piece until I read "No, I don't care, and it's not a productive discussion."
That was a very surprisingly petulant and rude thing to hear from an otherwise very eloquent writer on a great site. I appreciate frank opinions when timed appropriately, but that line was not well placed, especially on a site devoted to having discussions about MMO's.

Tithian
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Tithian

wjowski At the time. Compared to today's standards, they are pretty hardcore.

carson63000
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carson63000

borghive carson63000 I've always felt that was wildly overstated, in WoW. May have been true in EQ, but in WoW, I played heavily in that time (like, pretty much 100% of my leisure time for years), and I just don't remember it being the case. I don't think there were more than a handful of people on my server that were e-famous either in a good way, or in a bad way that meant you'd avoid grouping with them.

wjowski
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wjowski

Tithian 
Neither Vanilla WoW or Black Desert are 'hardcore' MMOs.  WoW pretty much made it's name on being more accessible than the competition.

Lethality
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Lethality

DPandaren skoryy "wonky as fuck mechanics"? You mean fun, challenging and skill-based?
And god forbid there was a higher bar to reach... something that took dedication, communication and teamwork. 
WoW trained players to ignore those things and then spoon-fed remedial content to players in its place. And hence, you have WoW with 9 million less players than it once did. 
They thought pandering to the lowest common denominator would help - it does not.

SallyBowls1
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SallyBowls1

Synchronicity: a recent Slashdot link 

For eight years the arts collective Newmindspace had been staging free lightsaber battles, and in December they set a world record with 9,951 "combatants" simultaneously participating in San Francisco, Los Angeles, San Diego and Seattle. But then in January they received a letter from the copyright attorneys for the Star Wars franchise. "We immediately stopped using the words 'lightsaber,' 'Jedi,' 'Sith' and 'The Force,' " the group's co-founder told the technology blog of the San Jose Mercury News, saying they've still been "aggressively pursued" for the last three months. '''In March we received further communication stating 'The Light Battle Tour' and 'light sword' were still too close to their trademarks, and we moved to settle the dispute to avoid legal action." Their new solution involves referring to the weapons as "catblades", and they've re-branded their upcoming series of events (which begins on April 30 in San Jose) as the "Cats in Space Tour".

My complete guess is that the SWG EMU would have had a much tougher time if Disney had been involved rather than the House of Smed who were a lot less profit focused/skilled.

DPandaren
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DPandaren

skoryy I feel like the Wildstar excuse is a bit difficult to compare. Because even though there were the same type of hard core raiding system in place. Wildstar plays vastly different compared to Vanilla WoW. People stopped playing Wildstar not just because of it being too hardcore, they also stopped playing it because it has wonky as fuck mechanics and has a high bar to reach when playing even the easiest dungeon.

borghive
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borghive

carson63000 borghive The Wow community has always had its share of jerks. The thing is, in the past, your reputation could really effect your access to many of the game's group activities because your server reputation meant something. The current game has pretty much invalidated any need to at least try to be to civil to your fellow gamer with all the cross realm grouping tools. I really don't think gamers have changed all that much over the years, but rather the games we play have become way more accessible, and now cater to that egocentric type of gamer, more so than ever before. So I really disagree with you on your premise that legacy servers would host the same type of community the current servers have, because just like in the old version, the community would police itself to an extent.

DelusionalRogue
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DelusionalRogue

I can respect that.

Tethyss
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Tethyss

You can have my money -- I want my talent trees back and some other stuff.  When you dramatically change the core fundamentals of the class system and people don't like it, expect them to gravitate toward vanilla versions.  We still love the game, just not what you've done with it recently.

Estranged
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Estranged

I think WildStar is fine. Too many quests for my taste, however. Is overwhelming.

ManastuUtakata
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ManastuUtakata

Karl_Hungus ManastuUtakata carson63000 Loopstah wjowski 
If Blizz doesn't compromise on this...exactly. :)

ManastuUtakata
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ManastuUtakata

PaulTabayoyong SallyBowls1 
Edit/Erratum: In *comparison...proper.

Karl_Hungus
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Karl_Hungus

ManastuUtakata Karl_Hungus carson63000 Loopstah wjowski 
Eh, I don't really see it affecting Blizz at all. They've been dealing with this clamoring for so long now that they're immune to it.They are wholly invested in the expansion pack cycle, having had Legion planned for years. They know where they want to take the game: forwards, not backwards. I understand why people want to go back. I certainly had more fun with the game then than now. But looking at it objectively, I can't see Blizzard changing their plans anytime soon. Folks are just going to have to resign themselves to hopping private servers.

carson63000
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carson63000

borghive agree 100% with "people just want a community again", but I actually think exactly the opposite would happen if Blizzard released an official nostalgia server. I think people found a community on these emulated servers precisely because they were small and you had to seek them out and they attracted a dedicated playerbase. I suspect an official nostalgia server would actually have exactly the same quality of community as the main WoW servers, and the people who enjoyed the private servers so much would be fearfully disappointed.

ManastuUtakata
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ManastuUtakata

Karl_Hungus ManastuUtakata carson63000 Loopstah wjowski 
Maybe so. And another segment thinks Blizz has reasons, but they not good enough. While others don't care for the excuse or reasons, they just want to their Vanilla servers. What is undeniable, this will likely continue to bite Blizz in the ass...unless they go the rope, bring in some compromises where everyone could win in the long term. But that's up to them. As I said, I know what I would do if this was my IP. I am not Blizz, however. Nor their accountant. /shrug

ManastuUtakata
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ManastuUtakata

PaulTabayoyong 
Citation please.

MaxSand
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MaxSand

BritoBruno MaxSand Are they "proffessional" writers?

Karl_Hungus
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Karl_Hungus

SallyBowls1 Karl_Hungus DrowNoble 
Indeed. That's my point. Subscriptions are no longer important because other revenue streams are keeping the game profitable. And this is one of the bigger reasons we won't be seeing any type of whatever server anytime soon. They're not going to give us a version of the game that never sees an expansion when expansion sales are this strong. Anyone who wants to argue against that logic is letting their passions blind them.

Tithian
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Tithian

BritoBruno Tithian breetoplay They had 15k concurrent.  Their playerbase was something like 150k-200k active, and 800k registered.
And what you're saying about the server isn't something I would consider a drawback. A lot of players in an MMO is bad? Staggering progression like the EQ progression servers?

Karl_Hungus
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Karl_Hungus

ManastuUtakata Karl_Hungus carson63000 Loopstah wjowski 
I just meant that there seems to be this section of the population who thinks Blizz has nothing but excuses for why they won't do whatever it is we want them to do, whether its a dance studio or vanilla servers. It doesn't matter. People seem to think Blizz should just throw all the weight of their money at something the fans want. It's a very limited perspective. Even when Blizz publicly gives us their reasons, those of us who don't like the response just dismiss it as an excuse. I'm not sure when gamers got so cynical, but it certainly doesn't make me envy the life of a developer.

KevinSmith11
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KevinSmith11

BritoBrunoo Well Bruno, bad PR is bad for any company, period.  I don't care how small it is no company want's bad PR.  And if you took just 3 sec's to pull your head out of your ***, you would have seen that I agree with blizzard going after illegal servers myself.  But also think Blizzard should look into opening a dialog with others that are willing to sign and do business by Blizzards standards and wishes, to run legal servers.

Bad PR can destroy a otherwise well doing company.  There have been many companies brought down by just one bad mistake.

PaulTabayoyong
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PaulTabayoyong

These long drawn out way past the point arguments happen whenever people discuss the ridiculousness of vanilla servers. You want to know when blizzard WILL do this? When more than 3% of active players are begging, it would have to be basically 100%. And even then they still might not with there tried and true tenant that has garnered them so much success, "We make the games we want to play."
And they like the other 5 million paying wow customers don't want to play vanilla servers.

schmidtcapela
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schmidtcapela

breetoplay distaste wjowski 
The same reason big changes in MMOs are often poorly received, I would guess. The end result might be good, but it isn't what people originally liked, which results in some backlash.

Kinda like why I don't think I will ever touch TOR or ESO; they might even be good games, to the point I might be willing to try them if they didn't have their respective famous IPs, but they are not what I expect or want from a Bioware Star Wars game or an Elder Scrolls game.

(Though as far as the drinks go not everyone likes the "improved" version. I would rather drink tap water than New Coke, Pepsi, or almost any of the generics, even though I do like Classic Coke.)

borghive
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borghive

In my opinion ,people just want a community again, and Vanilla Wow does pretty well at fostering community. I don't think people are especially fond of the actual game and it's system at the end of the day. I'm betting if you had mix of modern Wow with some old school systems that fostered an actual Mmo community players would flock to that in droves.

breetoplay
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breetoplay

distaste wjowski An incredibly interesting example, since so many taste tests show that people prefer generics, pepsi, and even new coke to coke classic. But slap that red label on it and give it a swanky bottle and retro, comforting brand name and people lose their minds for it.

breetoplay
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breetoplay

DrowNoble Eliot didn't dismiss the issue; he spent an entire article explaining why it should be dismissed directly because Blizzard doesn't care and has said repeatedly it will not give in on this issue. To act as if he hasn't spent the majority of his other columns criticizing Blizzard's decisions is unjust.

Radfist
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Radfist

SallyBowls1 Radfist There would still be illegal sites, sure. But I think a large number would just make their home on the official server which they know wont be wiped.  Character security is a big thing in MMOs.

SallyBowls1
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SallyBowls1

Radfist That might have been a reasonable plan in the past, but the opportunity for that for Vanilla has gone.
I would guess the lawyers are cheaper in the long run than having to keep multiple servers up as well as development to deal with mergers, etc.
I am also unconvinced that having legal options would have a big impact on the number of illegal sites that would need to be attacked.  People steal cracked/hacked games in spite of them being legally available.

SallyBowls1
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SallyBowls1

A couple of poor people can certainly and obviously do products that big companies can not.  
If I release a bad, buggy game it just dies; no external impact.  If Bliz releases a disaster, it tarnishes their multi-billion dollar brand.  Look at security: I can't think of non-porn companies that are bigger targets for recreational hackers than gaming companies. I don't like to run unupdated systems and IMO, the idea of bringing decades old code online has risks. Say you make a game and your systems are hacked. Thousands or hundreds of thousands of people are impacted/damaged.  But your company has negligible assets so lawsuits and fines are not viable and you shut the company down so the bad reputation is irrelevant. Now look at the impact and actual and reputation costs those times when Sony's network was hacked.

Loopstah
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Loopstah

Damonvile Loopstah wjowski See my message above. I am calling hypocrites out on the fact that their only arguments are related to legality of Blizzard's move and not the bigger picture. If you're gonna judge somebody about something illegal they've done, then be prepared to be judged yourself. It's a two way street. We might be both right, but ultimately it's failure to take into consideration all the factors surrounding this conundrum. 
I am not calling for reinstatement of Nostalrius, nor that Blizzard should just let private servers exist. I am pointing out Blizzard's fallout from their fan base and (in my opinion) unreasonable refusal to allow vanilla to exist as a separate entity. 
They talk about not having resources to maintain such an instance - then license private servers, collect royalty fees, and have a fully satisfied fan base.

Radfist
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Radfist

Yeah emulation is bad and illegal mmkay, but even so, to deny that there is a large contingent of ex-WoW players who would play of official retro servers is silly. 

I don't see how hard it could be to just leave one servers up permanently at the last patch of each expansion. Got to be cheaper than chasing up player run classic servers with your legal team.

Loopstah
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Loopstah

BritoBruno Loopstah Damonvile wjowski Exactly. And i agree completely. 
Again - you're trying to deliver a message that Blizzard was right to shut down the server regardless of how everyone feels about it - which is correct.
I am trying to deliver two messages - first is that single-lined responses such as "didn't your mom teach you not to steal" are hypocritical, and if that's a person's only argument - then i will call them out on it. Second message is that there is more to this than just the legality of the move - it's about raising awareness about Blizzard's disconnect from its fan base.

Damonvile
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Damonvile

Lethality MyNameIsIllegal carson63000 Loopstah wjowski Not to mention the "fans" who want a BC server, and Wotlk server. The fans who want a progression server, the fans who want xx patch on their server that others don't.

And can anyone guess where those "fans" go when they don't get what they want ? TO THE FORUMS!!!
It's a wonderful thing when arguing a company give you what you want.....but like always. It's easy to do when you only consider you getting what you want and nothing else.

Damonvile
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Damonvile

Loopstah Damonvile wjowski I know what you were trying to do but 2 wrongs don't make a right. If everyone had to live perfect lives in order to judge others guilty, it would kind of make it hard to have judges, cops, lawyers ( lol at that one ) etc.

So they may be a hypocrite for calling people out on this, but that in no way makes it right. " Everyone else does it" is a childish excuse. At some point adults have to be adults and judge their actions based on their own decisions. Not on what everyone else does.

SallyBowls1
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SallyBowls1

WandaClamshuckr  So? The number of people who would pay $15/month is obviously much smaller than the number that would play for free.  But if we are extremely generous and say there is a million dollars a month potential here, I don't see where anyone has made the case that is worth Blizzard's time.  WoD sold 3 million copies in a week.  It is hard to see how spending all their efforts on Legion isn't the better answer. Nor is the scale exciting to a large company; at $1M a month it would take 492 years to earn what ATVI just spent to buy a mobile studio.

BritoBruno
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BritoBruno

Loopstah Damonvile wjowski Well, i do download songs, play pservers and cross the street outside the crossing ( well, the last one, in my defense, there are almost no crossings in my town ).
But i never throw garbage in the open terrain next to my home ( like people around here do ), or never throw garbage anywhere that's not a bin, really. I don't accept wrong change, i don't lie, and i don't attack someone's credibility before knowing them a bit, or hearing their arguments.
I'm not saying that i'm a great guy, or i'm right or wrong. I'm trying to illustrate that while the emotions are running, nothing here is about ethics or morality, right or wrong.
It's just about "does blizzard has the right to fuck up the server i invested time in?" And the answer is Yes.

BritoBruno
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BritoBruno

Rohirrim Great. Read it. Feel it. Take it to heart. Cherish it.
AND THEN MOVE ON. Forget Blizzard and go to the next Pserver and relive it all over again.
God.

wpDiscuz