Riot Games wins $10M in a lawsuit against League of Legend cheating software

At least today, cheating does not prosper, particularly for those who attempted to circumvent the rules in League of Legends.

A court awarded $10 million to Riot Games following a successful lawsuit against LeagueSharp. LeagueSharp was the maker of a service that allowed players to hack the game, artificially accelerate their character’s progress, and see forbidden information.

PC Gamer reports that Riot filed the lawsuit last summer, saying that players were using the service to level and sell characters for profit. The suit concluded in January, and LeagueSharp has been given until February 28th to close it all down. The ruling not only awards $10M to Riot but also bans the software and turns over LeagueSharp’s websites and domains to Riot.

Following the ruling, LeagueSharp warned players that using its software was a good way to get themselves banned from the MOBA.

Source: Law 360, PC Gamer
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14 Comments on "Riot Games wins $10M in a lawsuit against League of Legend cheating software"

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Stropp

I’m a little surprised that Riot didn’t also obtain a list of all the accounts that used the LeagueSharp service, and use that to immediately ban those accounts.

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John Mclain

Was thinking the exact same thing. But I’m sure it was because of privacy concerns that the court didn’t allow them to obtain it. Of course now that RIOT controls the service, anyone continuing to use it will obviously be found out.

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Stropp

To a certain extent, privacy rules might not apply here. I believe that movie companies have successfully applied to the courts to uncover the identities of users of torrenting services in order to bill them. This is probably a similar legal situation.

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Rhime

“Following the ruling, LeagueSharp warned players that using its software was a good way to get themselves banned from the MOBA.”
Duh..ya think? I would hope every cheating douchebag that used this dumbass company also got banned for it. Cheaters should kill themselves…

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BalsBigBrother

Yes they should be banned but as for the rest of what you said relax its only a game.

deekay_plus
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deekay_plus

the problem with this if we go by massively’s reporting is the suit was won by profiting off selling accounts.

so basically a huge set back for consumer rights (hey that’s me and you kiddo) and a big win for massive corporations shitting on us all in the name of “gaming is for kidds and silly”.

deekay_plus
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deekay_plus

don’t get me wrong not in favour of cheating at all, and they deserve to get fucked. but this is bad for you and i.

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Robert Mann

I don’t know, I think buying and selling accounts impacts the better business models of the genre and is part of what brought us to the monetization purgatory we currently have. I’m not opposed to the idea entirely, but many games that weren’t WoW success stories suffered from this pretty hard.

I’d rather see the ability to sell off old accounts go away, and see monetization be less of a pain in the behind. Of course, I don’t expect the two to correlate well given the interest of investors…

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silverlock

I think you have the wrong end of the stick. Bringing up the selling of characters for a profit was to show the monetary nature of the program and that players where using this cheat to run a business at Riots expense.

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Armsbend

It sounds like developers are making some headway against company’s profiting by ruining their game. Great news!

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Tiresias

That’s a solid legal precedent to set, and hopefully it will make other similar court cases a slam-dunk.

There is a lot of money in botting programs these days. People will gladly pay $5 to $50 a month to get a serious advantage, especially in competitive games. The market for it is massive, and the creators of good botting programs occasionally make millions of dollars a year.

The court systems have been slow to react, as there is no actual legislation that covers this specific situation. It’s comforting to see them finally start to rule in favor of the game developers and not the botters; a ruling in the other direction could have caused irreparable harm to the industry.

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Doubleplusgood

I at first was wondering how a bot maker would be able to pay a 10 million settlement, thinking maybe it was just a small time programmer, but I didn’t know the business was that big and profitable.

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silverlock

The video game industry is now bigger then the movie industry. I think at this point we need to be concerned more about the courts starting to favor the industry over consumers. But yeah anyone in botting should look for a new career path as jail sentences are more likely then not a some point down the line.

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kgptzac

I would hardly call the groups making and profiting from bots “consumers”. I hope there are harsher legal punishments for those who do that though.

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