Korean studio Move Games resurrects ASTA on Steam

When I mentioned in our newsroom that I was working on an ASTA post, nobody believed me, but it’s true: ASTA: The War of Tears and Winds is getting another lease on life.

You’ll recall that Webzen originally ported the game westward in 2015, soft-launching in an open beta here after the game had sunsetted in Korea the same year — and after having been in development since 2010. However, Webzen gave up after a year, sunsetting the western version this past October.

MMO Culture noticed that the game has popped up on Steam, however, with a posted release date of April 26, 2017, and a brand-new publisher: Move Games Co., Ltd., which is reportedly well-versed in picking up and relaunching Korean games for different audiences. According to the Steam and Facebook updates, the game will grant all registered players a “beginner’s gift” bundle for showing up. What is dead can never die.

ASTA Opening Teaser

Now, we release the opening video in the game. The story of the video is one of the many stories in the ASTA world, and what kind of wonderful story can you make?※ ASTA for Steam will be released in 26th, April!

Posted by ASTA for Steam on Wednesday, April 12, 2017

ASTA cute version

In the Asta World, you can design your character's look as you like whenever. How about you can customize a cute girl like video of below? Of course we do not doubt that she will be very strong unlike appearance.※ ASTA for Steam will be released in 26th, April!

Posted by ASTA for Steam on Monday, April 17, 2017

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12 Comments on "Korean studio Move Games resurrects ASTA on Steam"

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Robert Mann

Bring on the jokes once more!

Already Stale, Try Again: The battle between crying and farting!

What, they totally set themselves up for this… go enjoy the game if you want, just chuckle a little at that title!

Celestia
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Celestia

I tried it during the original NA open beta and thought it was a fun game. Will have to give it a twirl again on the 26th.

Reader
Koshelkin

As far as I am aware the developed never intended to close the game, it was more due to the publisher moving it’s focus to mobile games.

Xijit
Reader
Kickstarter Donor
Xijit

Yeah, and then Webzen made the mistake of launching it just before BDO hit & then Nexon came out with Icarus right around then too … If they had waited 6 more months and launched it right after the excitement of BDO started dying out, it would have done a bit better.

django857
Reader
django857

Wow i liked this game alot. To bad we can’t login to my old characters. This is good though.

Xijit
Reader
Kickstarter Donor
Xijit

It is a good game … I just didn’t have time to commit to it.

aYates
Reader
aYates

I actually enjoyed playing this game for about a month or so.
It’s a fun little Asian WoW-clone.
Not sure what there is to do at endgame, though.

I’ll definitely check out the relaunch on Steam, when it hits.

Reader
Johnnyt305

Why not say an Everquest clone? WOW copied that game

ihatevnecks
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ihatevnecks

WoW and Everquest were two very different games if you actually played both of them. The philosophies behind leveling speed, leveling methods (questing vs camping), dungeons (running a dungeon vs camping it), travel, and so many other things were entirely different.

WoW may have been a fantasy MMO like EQ, something EQ wasn’t the first at, but to call WoW a copy of EQ? That’s just silly.

Reader
Johnnyt305

Actually NOW they are. But back when WOW started they were very similar. IF YOU PLAYED THEM back then you would know that.

ihatevnecks
Reader
ihatevnecks

Except they really weren’t, again for the reasons I listed.

EQ’s dungeons were campfests – you went in and sat on a waiting list until a specific camp spot opened. WoW fixed that by having all of their dungeons instanced “runs” from start to finish. Tell me how that’s at all similar?

EQ’s leveling was all about traveling around each zone finding grind spots, very similar to the dungeons themselves; they had very few quests as we know them, and those that did exist were activated by specific key words and figuring out which npcs to use those words on. WoW changed that by having explicitly labeled quest NPCs with big yellow exclamations, whose quests were tracked in a detailed quest log rather than requiring you to remember or figure out everything by yourself. Tell me how that’s at all similar?

EQ’s travel was based on running everywhere by foot, unless you were lucky enough to have a druid or wizard friend to port you to specific locations and not charge you money for it. Even then, these ports didn’t open up for many months into the game’s life, as they were high level spells those classes had to find and learn. Early on getting from two main cities (Qeynos > Freeport) was a multi-hour ordeal where you had to run through hazardous zones and hope not to die. WoW’s travel was based on running somewhere and unlocking a flight point to it, so you never had to run there again. Travel was always completely safe if you stayed on roads, even in higher level zones. Tell me how that’s at all similar?

These are just three core game concepts; there are countless other examples like leveling speed, class talent design, the idea of needing ‘magic’ weapons to hit certain enemies in EQ, the requirements of food/water in EQ.

So no, they really weren’t all that similar.

Xijit
Reader
Kickstarter Donor
Xijit

Because the developers literally labeled it as being the Asian WoW.

The entire design was to gut the Warcraft Lore out of WoW and then replace it with assorted Asian mythology.

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