‘Reputation should matter’: Crowfall ties your account name to your character name

Anonymous griefers, Crowfall might not be the game for you. In May’s developer Q&A video, the team clarified that players’ character names will be the same as their account names in order to make reputation important within the community.

“Players enforce their own rules,” said Design Lead Thomas Blair about the lawless Dregs campaign world. “People who cause problems generally find that they will have a bad time. And in Crowfall, you can’t hide from a bad reputation because that’s your account name. So it’s not like, ‘Oh, I’ll go create an alt and fool more people.’ Reputation should matter.”

Other topics discussed included taking over points of interests, testing citadels, commerce in a rule-free world, and transporting materials across the world. You can watch the 13-minute video after the break!

Source: YouTube
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70 Comments on "‘Reputation should matter’: Crowfall ties your account name to your character name"

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Rottenrotny

Good on them. Solid design choice imo.

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haishao

Not that I was going to play that game but I have always viewed my account name as part of my account security on similar level to my password. I would be pissed off if a game I paid for just decided to show half my account credential to the world.

A better way would be to make Family name like in Black Desert.
Something like GW2 could work too but it allow creeps to stalk you in and out of the game.

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wratts

Absolutely right. One of the biggest reasons accounts get hacked is that companies are lax about enforcing better account naming policies. Passwords are only half the login cipher after all.

Moreover, many people have some variation of their rl name in their account name, particularly when it’s tied to email address.

Going to have to look into this more

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Robert Mann

Aye, but they aren’t tying to things like that so far as we have heard. Obviously people should be taking some measure of security into account.

Personally, I’d like to see this as just one more thing to fill out, rather than just an account login put on everything, which might well be the case. There’s a mention of ‘account name’ but there isn’t a mention that this is your login account name. So more details needed, is there an account name input in addition to account login, or are they the same.

If they are the same, then this is all a valid concern. If there’s meant to be a name that players choose as their “account name” different from their login, then that fixes this concern.

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Dean Greenhoe

I like the idea. Reputation should matter.

miol
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miol

They forget that “reputation” goes both ways!

This will make it extremely hard to defend yourself, if a bigger group decides to target you and spread false accounts of what happened without your knowledge!

Or if you want to have separate circles of friends for different activities, without the fear of being pressured to be commited to only one of them!

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Robert Mann

True, but it is amazing how quickly people start recording if something like that happens… and how quickly such groups find themselves untrusted and in the gutter.

The second is a more valid concern, and honestly something which people will either deal with or not. I believe in telling people “Look, just want to do this as I want to do it, if that’s a problem for you then we are going our different ways.” Groups which pressure people will become far smaller if people stand up for themselves, and other groups which accept that will replace them.

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Brown Jenkin

Yep, appreciate this in every game that does it.

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Danny Smith

Not a bad idea, works in FFXIV. You do everything on one character so unless you want to throw away 23 jobs all levelled and all the items you cant get anymore on new characters you dont reroll. Your face and name in game are yours and that leads to a very japanese style “sense of shame” if you are an ass.
Conversely of course it means ill run into people i met 3 years ago, recognise the name and face and say hello like “oh you are the guy that melded my BLM relic back in 2.0, hows it going?” and that ‘server rep’ idea that leads to recognised names -and blacklisted assholes of course- leads to a far more persistent feeling server community. More mmos should try it like this. Can’t run from being a massive dick if people go “oh its this asshole again” when you roll up to try and be an ass to the same people again.

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Scree

FFXIV is one of the MMO’s I’ve had no experience with; it’s nice to see this practice having been used elsewhere.

The problem in Crowfall is; one account can’t do everything right away. Real-time training will hamper that. Still, it does allow for people to develop specialties and communicate socially to find what they need.

styopa
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styopa

That’s a bold move. I suspect people won’t like it (not just the a-holes, but say, women who don’t want to be cyber-stalked ingame, etc) but I think it’s a bold move.

Good on them for going across the grain.

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Robert Mann

This is a good thing for games, as opposed to real name shenanigans. However, I do like the occasional play session incognito for some games… so I can see that point.

Still, I’d rather just not be able to go incognito, tell people I just want to play solo for a bit if asked, and have the jerks be known far and wide.

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Mr_Fester

Cryptic tried this, you see what happened to them.

Tamanous
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Tamanous

That had absolutely nothing to do with what happened to Cryptic. Every game should do this and is an a proven tool for player control over abuse.

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enamel

Reputation used to matter, but the culture as reached a point where just as many players will openly celebrate assholes as will condemn them.

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Robert Mann

Which is where ‘asshole’ servers then come into play. At least, so many studios seem to think.

I guess it depends on how much you need other people in any game. If you can thrive with only you and your small band of jerks, then such servers will be needed.