Bethsoft says Elder Scrolls VI ‘is not in dev,’ gamers spurn Creation Club modding plans

Get comfy in The Elder Scrolls Online, TES franchise fans: While there will eventually be another single-player game in the Elder Scrolls series, it’s not currently in development. That’s according to Bethsoft’s Pete Hines, who debunked rumors at E3 that TES:VI is among the games currently in production, implying that other projects are taking priority before the teams return to Tamriel in a non-MMO capacity.

It’s not entirely new news; Hines has been repeating variations of this rebuttal for years, just as he did right up until The Elder Scrolls Online was formally announced, so as usual, take it all with a sackful of saltrice.

In other Elder Scrolls news, the internet is busy going ballistic over what appears to be Bethsoft’s second attempt at paid mods via what it’s calling the “Creation Club.” It looks like a variation of what companies like Digital Extremes and Studio Wildcard offer, a partnership with specific modders to create mods under the studio’s banner. The controversy, of course, revolves around the proposed storefront through which these modders will sell their stuff — and the “credits” system players will be using to buy those mods. So far the program appears to be limited to Skyrim and Fallout 4, so ESO fans needn’t worry just yet.

Source: Kotaku via VG247
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79 Comments on "Bethsoft says Elder Scrolls VI ‘is not in dev,’ gamers spurn Creation Club modding plans"

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Lord Zorvan

There are more modders against paid mods than those for them. And there is absolutely nothing to stop a modder making a free mod similar in function to a paid one. In fact, the only possible legal way would be to ban “user” modding completely. So this will dry up fairly quickly.

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TAKu

ESO is dead to me and many others for their shady ESO PLUS FOR DLC (oh the newest isn’t DLC sowwy) move. No new Elder Scrolls game in development just kills it for me for their studio for a while.

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Dug From The Earth

I realize that ESO is their cash cow right now, steadily bringing in money for them.

Unfortunately, ESO just doesnt have lasting power. It simply doesnt have an end game that can satisfy the typical mmorpg player from games like the EQ series, WoW, and many others. Its more akin to the end game in Guild Wars 2. However, the 2 things both those games have going for them,that keeps them with at least SOME players, is the fact that there is ZERO subscription cost.

Well… sort of. Trying to play ESO without ESO+ (15 dollar subscription), is pretty annoying. The limited bag and bank space, and the freaking insane amount of materials you pick up for crafting pretty much makes ESO+ a must. Unless you dont do crafting, which ultimately can seriously hurt you for the end game. Not being able upgrade your own gear makes the gear grind so much worse. Any non-crafted gear is Bind on Pickup, which means you cant have another crafter upgrade it. Unless of course they were on the dungeon run with you, and manage to do that within the 2 hours period where its able to be traded.

Either way, what Im personally finding out, as much as I love the game, is that ESO, once you have done the story content, simply doesnt have anything to offer me anymore. It simply doesnt have the same replay value of a game like Morrowind or Skyrim.

Im Cp 296 now, with 4 level 50s (including a warden), ive done all 3 factions stories, and all DLC except for all of Cragslorn. When I play now, all it does is make me desire to go back to other older mmorpgs.

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Schmidt.Capela

So, given that Skyrim SE disables achievements if any mod is loaded, Bethesda is making achievement compatibility an incentive for people to only use paid mods. As in, you can use as many paid mods as you want and still get achievements, but dare to load a single unpaid mod and you permanently disable achievements for any game saved while the mod was loaded.

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Lord Zorvan

Yeah, achievement locks were modded out long ago. lol

Loyheta
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Loyheta

The elder scrolls and elder scrolls online teams are completely different developments companies right? How would either affect the other development-wise?

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Lord Zorvan

A TES 6 would result in a very large exodus of ESO players, resulting in an exodus of their cash. Zenimax Media will not allow that to happen.

Loyheta
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Loyheta

That doesn’t make any sense. Most people leave an mmo for a few weeks to play another game. Some leave mmos for a month or two to try out another mmo. MMOs don’t have anything to fear from offline games. All they would really do is make a tremendous amount of money and most of those players would play it to completion and then go back.

Skyrim made nearly half a billion dollars the first week. To date it has an average playtime of 97.2 hours. Please tell me how making half a billion dollars is going to hurt this company. Then tell me how it will steal the playerbase for anything longer than a couple of weeks.

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Lord Zorvan

Because the majority of ESO players are only playing it because they’re waiting for the next TES game and ESO is the only newish ES thing around ( outside of a card game rofl ), and Zen knows it.

Also, consider this. a new TES game is $60. That’s an entire game that gives hundreds of hours of entertainment. Now look at ESO, $40 for an expansion with about 15-20 hours of content along with $15, $20, $25 “DLC” that each only add 5-10 hours of actual non-repeatable content. And a store filled with things ranging from $2 to $55. Which is bringing more bang for the buck to Zenimax? ESO is way less work for way more money, and with subs and store purchases that money is a never ending flow.

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Sally Bowls

Because ZeniMax Media Inc is the company that owns them all: ZOS, BS, Arkane, Id, Battlecry, MG, et al. They. ZMI, need to allocate resources across all their subsidiaries. It is very rare for a company to be able to have the resources to add lots of new staff across multiple subsidiaries without cutting back somewhere. It is no different than the similar comments on Arenanet being a separate company. NCSoft can’t really increase every subsidiary by a lot; they have to allocate. Same for ZMI.

Product Portfolio Management is a term for managing not just optimizing product#17, but a more holistic approach managing the suite of products to benefit the company.

Loyheta
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Loyheta

I did mean studios just got too lazy to edit it in time.

Correct me if I’m wrong but most companies will have separate teams for an mmo and a single player game. The mmo team continually works on expansions and content to add to this ongoing game. A team focused on a single player game develops the game and then moves onto the next project.

If I’m remembering correctly they brought on a new team for the game, Zenimax Online Studios. This being the only game under the belt of said team. I find it hard to believe they’d cannibalize or tear apart any other team that works on fallout or elder scrolls for a continual project.

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Sally Bowls

They don’t zero out teams. But there is a real difference between the star project that has 3 dozen job openings and the underfunded where some headcount will not be replaced when they leave. And contractors are designed to be more flexible than “permanent” employees – you can take on lots of contractors and then not renew the contract.

Within the last week, there was a CU discussion where the experts from the comments were criticizing Mark Jacobs and he said

We had enough programmers to start work but we had expected to be able to get a few from Zenimax after ESO launched. Unfortunately for us, ESO was also delayed and Robert Altman with advice (I suspect, I don’t know this) from brilliant guys like Todd Howard, much to his credit, kept pouring money into the game

Note this implies that even online games have staffing cycles and the CEO of the overarching ZMI was making the decision.

nvidia
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nvidia

It wouldn’t development-wise, but you’d be mistaken if you thought a new Elder Scrolls single-player game wouldn’t pull people away from ESO.

Loyheta
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Loyheta

Seems short-sighted to not work on a far more popular game with a different dev studio to work on DLC. Most people I know that enjoyed TES or FO games really disliked ESO. All save a couple are not willing to give it another chance because it lacked the character/soul of TES games. I just don’t understand why they’d pass on another chapter in one of the most successful game series.

Just saying that these are separate dev teams. Also it will take years to make a new game. So if they aren’t working on TES6 then we probably won’t see one til 2019 and that just feels horrible.

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Lord Zorvan

Apparently by Bethesda’s own E3 declaration, 10 million people like ESO and play it.

Loyheta
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Loyheta

Note that is players aka accounts not current players. Skyrim itself has sold over 30 million copies as of November of 16.

Skyrim still boasts 16k average players daily over the last month with an additional 9k on the special edition.

So yeah, again, I find it hard to fathom why they would shelve TES6 for years for this. Must have good cash shop sales. I won’t be surprised to see micro-transactions in tes6 after the success of ESO.

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Sally Bowls

I thought the last one took 4-5 years so ’21 or ’22 seem a more reasonable bet than ’19. 22-11-22 is what I am betting on.

Loyheta
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Loyheta

That’s heartbreaking

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NeoWolf

Frankly if a paid collaboration with mod makers means my favourite mods in FO4, Skyrim and even ESO are garunteed not to cause conflicts and will get constantly updated then frankly I don’t mind one little bit throwing a couple of bucks down for a mod.

WHY? Because i’m sick of finding mods I love only to have them not supported six months later and borken every time the game gets an update. And this is particularly true with ESO as the basic UI is a fecking joke.

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Lord Zorvan

I pay for experienced developers to make me content, not amateurs.

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NeoWolf

If you think experienced developers is a guaruntee of quality content you have clearly not paid attention to the last 50 years of computer game development as the sh** pile is high lol

But that aside the whole reason it is a collaboration is to ENSURE the quality of what is being sold is there, so not necessarily going to be a relevant concern.

xpsync
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xpsync

ESO is all i play now, i don’t bother with forums, gloss this site every few days, weeks and yea nothing new as usual or anything is so far out it’s not worth being on the radar yet.

I just play this mmo and don’t worry about talking about mmo’s, it’s the same o same o, just play them, talking about them endlessly isn’t for me anymore. I don’t repress the activity, i just rather play and enjoy them and not worry or waste time on what everyone thinks. Huge F’in difference in your enjoyment level and much more time available to play.

ESO for all it’s shortcomings is a really decent mmo now, amazing in game community, and the variety of things you can do, i have 5 toons all with different overall game themes.

My warden right now i made a provisioner and i recipe hunt, while i do that i treasure hunt and of course explore, harvest, craft. The world is so huge overall now. Got a thief/sin toon, dungeon toon, explorer toon, rp quest toon. Haven’t even made it into werewolf or vampire chars yet.

It’s in many ways the only MMO worth anyone’s time, as in things to do, amazing peeps playing it, crafting, exploring, graphics, popularity, as i mentioned above you can invent so many styles of play, you just enjoy.

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Castagere Shaikura

I really don’t care about what Bethesda is doing anymore. This years E3 was so uninteresting to me. Not one game made me want to play it. Maybe i’m getting old or just tired of how the game industry works today. So many of my friends that i gamed with are all meh about games these day’s and are just playing older games if any. The whole issue about mods is strange. I do believe if people want to get paid for their work they should.

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Half of the hate is how late this is coming in the current game cycle. Skyrim came out 11-11-11. People were expect some hint of our next ES game, not this.

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agemyth 😩

ESO came out in 2015 and is the next Elder Scrolls game people should be looking to for that fix.

Whether ESO scratches your itch for a “real” Elder Scrolls game is a very valid but different issue. Direct these complaints at ZOS :P They were tasked with making the next Elder Scrolls game people should look forward to after Skyrim.

Also, I don’t really care for the idea that Bethesda Game Studios should be shackled to this schedule of releasing Elder Scrolls and Fallout games one after the other until the end of time. After waiting this long, I might be disappointed to see a marginally better Elder Scrolls game that would basically be one step up from Fallout 4.

Reader

ESO is a huge and successful game, but it falls into a grey area from the core ES titles. It was created by ZOS and placed into a timeline far outside of the other ES titles. So that the core series and MMO don’t really overlap or undo any existing lore. They just share some similar mechanics.

The Core Series

The Elder Scrolls: Arena
The Elder Scrolls II: Daggerfall
The Elder Scrolls III: Morrowind
The Elder Scrolls IV: Oblivion
The Elder Scrolls V: Skryim

The next game in the core series will be titled “The Elder Scrolls VI”.

The expansions, mobile games and titles like “The Elder Scrolls Online” and “An Elder Scrolls Legend: Battlespire” exist in the same universe, but do stand apart.

The reasons that I enjoy the ES titles have little to do with the innovation between games. It has more to do with the exploration and story. They could use all of the same mechanics, the same engine and still make me happy with a new land and story to dive into. Most ES fans crave the adventure and experience that ES games give us.

Now having said that… I played ESO through twice (level cap). I did not get the same satisfaction out of it as I did the core series. I got a fraction of the playtime. Having perhaps 100 hours in that game. While I have around 300-400 hours in each of the core ES games.

It tries hard to emulate the experience of the single player titles, but it does not quite get there. The quests are a bit more generic, the impact you have on the world is much smaller. It has to incorporate grind mechanics and time gates to slow and balance progression across the playerbase. Its an online experience so it is very controlled, which obviously translates to no mod support. The combat is drastically different from the core series (and had to be that way), but it comes with its own host of issues.

There are things to like about it, but it also does many things that need to stay far far away from the core series.

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agemyth 😩

I agree with most of what you say and feel about the series.

If you ask anyone of importance who works on these games they will tell you that ESO is the current big thing and should be taken as seriously and canonically as a numbered Elder Scrolls game. Of course, they would because of business reasons. They will also tell you it is a good translation of the Elder Scrolls experience into a Online RPG form. ESO’s place in the timeline doesn’t really matter when Bethesda Game Studios itself has conveniently placed Skyrim hundreds of years into uncharted history for similar reasons.

ESO is, until it is shut down or practically irrelevant to the company, where all current desires for “the next Elder Scrolls” are directed to. I do not find it satisfactory in the same way I expect from a true numbered Elder Scrolls game, but it is all we are getting for the foreseeable future.

I think we both understand where we are coming from here and I hope I’m not coming off as argumentative. I’ll be waiting along with you however long it takes for the next “real” Elder Scrolls game to come, whatever it may be.

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Malcolm Swoboda

I think Bethesda just wants to get out one more major RPG and milk that some before revealing anything about a new TES. I expect at minimum good news of the next TES by 2020, and release by early 2020s. A decade of wait between titles? Bad, but you can’t say there was nothing in the meantime (DLC, Special Edition/platforms, mod support, ESO, Legends, other Beth games). There was several years between TES2 and TES3, a few years between TES3 and TES4, and five years between TES4 and TES5. This’ll be the largest gap, sure, but I’ll personally only be anywhere near ‘angrily impatient’ when we reach the next decade (so a few years of this Creation Club bs, Skyrim on Switch, VR, maybe another Beth game, that stuff).

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Sally Bowls

How about 22-11-22 for a shipdate?

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odin valhalla

How amusing. Ive read some of the vitriol on this subject and its amazing to me the depth of hypocrisy some people operate in. On the one hand they scream bloody murder about ethics etc if someone wants to charge for work they created. Someone breaks an NDA on a game in beta and fansites report it? Those same people are right there screaming AGAIN about how its not their responsibility to monitor gaming company releases or enforce disclosure agreements.

Having your cake and eating it too leads to the obesity of the spirit. You attain an unassailable position in nearly everything you verbally engage in. Which anyone with a modicum of objectivity will tell you is impossible, you cant be right all the time. Good for Bethesda for giving modders the opportunity and venue to sell their wares. Supply and demand economics in a fair environment is good for everyone IMHO.

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Jeremy Barnes

paid mods and someone else breaking an NDA to post information on a website…..I don’t see the hypocrisy. You seem to have unassailable position on this matter though.

Line
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Line

Their creation club is the worst thing to happen to mods ever.
Literally.

Mods are not made to be controlled by the developer.
Say goodbye to all the weird ass mods, the ones breaking down the engine, the ones using copyrighted content, and the massive conversions like Enderal.
Oh wait, that’s already how it works on consoles!

Fuck Bethesda… but at least Steam is not getting involved in this mess another time.
It’s not even here to only make money, but also to marginalize all the other mods options and insure their decline. As usual, fuck freedom, give us money, look at how convenient it is now! No you can’t do the same as before, you have to stay online, pay for online, don’t share your friends with other systems, but OBEY YOUR OVERLORDS PEASANTS.

Players should never want to see all those roadblocks and the ever increasing control of the legal team on their games.
But gotta keep praying to the company shrine.

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Jeremy Barnes

I didn’t really read about it because my interest in a game that’s getting close to six years old doesn’t really grab me, but did they say that this will prevent people from making mods EXCEPT through creation club? I assumed that there would still be normal mods, but then there would be some paid ones through this program.

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agemyth 😩

This will also be coming to Fallout 4 which is less than two years old. Still not a very compelling platform to be launching this “feature” on, but it makes sense to me to iron things out on games that have made the majority of their sales before they try to launch a new game with this in it.

I suspect if Steam had not pulled their mod marketplace implementation Fallout 4 may have either launched with paid mods or gotten the feature soon after they released the dev tools. If you’ve seen how SkyrimSE and Fallout 4 implement mods from Bethesda.net the skeleton for a marketplace is pretty much all in place other than, of course, the part where you buy Bethesda Bucks and spend them on mods.

Line
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Line

Of course it will be (should be at least, you never know), but as I said: the entire existence of this system is not to make things more practical or help poor modders get some money.

It’s here to replace the third party websites and screw around with assorted mod helpers to limit their influence, and destroy them if possible.
And to scam people that may not be in the know of modding, and be 100% that they’ll follow the company lines.

Same as it is on consoles. Great claims of freedom and “protecting customers” by insuring copyright and that only authorized tools are respected by threat of law.
You can then claim that there’s competition; buy competitors, abuse ID claims to stomp their videos, sue their websites into oblivion and generally throw all resistance from a bridge.

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George

I don’t get all the fuss… This is a great idea. The best mods, optimized and co-developed between skillful modders and the developers them-self DESERVE to be payed for. Other mods will still be free, and this is a very good chance to get more high quality content for the game we have invested so much hours in. Furthermore, no one is forcing you to buy them.

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Dominick Critelli

You clearly missed the Steam Workshop debacle.

Short version, you aren’t paying the modders, you’re paying Bethesda and they’re paying modders a pittance of what they get from you. The concern from the system is that Bethesda will try to use it’s existence as a means to justify going after third party sites, because they want as many people to get their mods exclusively from their storefront as possible. That’s not even factoring in the greed aspect of how the introduction of money into a paid passion scene can shift priorities and usually results in WORSE results, not better.

Modders get SLIGHTLY more money, but nowhere near enough for the amount of work needed to create high quality mods, third party sites and the sort exist in fear of legal action the moment Bethesda decides the “competition” is “stealing” too much of their “income” (Because remember, so long as a free modding scene exists along side a paid modding scene, someone will make alternatives to the paid mods that do the same things, if not doing them better.), and modders wind up still not getting paid the amount of money they deserve.

Mods should be funded through donations for all the reasons above, which is how the scene works now. Sites like Nexus regularly spam it’s users with suggestions to donate to modders they like, especially on highly rated and highly downloaded mods.

The ONLY ones who want this to change is Bethesda, because they see it as a piece of the pie they aren’t getting.

SuperBunnyHop made a youtube video about it which is a good quick-recap on the whole thing.

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George

I think it WAS a bad implementation of what have been proposed now. Now, people that want to create free mod, can still do it. Most of them will produce sub-par products with respect to content created by developers (most mods are junk, free junk but still junk). Then, there are more talented one, chosen and supported by the developers them-selves. They produce better stuff (or worse, who cares, you don’t HAVE to buy it), and since developers can produce only a certain amount of additional contents, this new way to produce quality content is a good thing to me. Everyone fear POSSIBLE changes to the scene. But you know what? I am the customer. I decide how to spend my money. And if I don’t like how all this turn out, I will just not buy the next TES game.

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Dominick Critelli

That’s a fine attitude to have, but the implications reach beyond just you. That’s the problem.

With this system in place, Bethesda has the potential to shut down the free modding scene for their games (Which I really, really hope they aren’t stupid enough to try) should they desire. They have the potential to place themselves into a situation where they are the gate with which to mod, and all other mods are disallowed or at the very least “contraband.”

If they were to do that, it would have far reaching implications. Not just on TES games, but on any PC games; and in fact, it could be argued the implications could stretch as far as just programs that have modules created by third parties not-for-profit in general, aside from totally open source projects like Paint.Net or Libre/Open Office. If Bethesda were able to get away with it, all the other companies would look towards their success and cry out in symphonic harmony “…me too!”

There would suddenly be a legal precedent against free mods for ANYTHING, which is something that has never existed before. That could create waves of trouble the likes of which has never been seen in the gaming industry.

I don’t expect Bethesda to be that daft, but it’s a slippery slope and they have shown historically they are /not/ above cheap moves to get more money. It’s blatant that Bethesda resents the modding scene, or more specifically, the fact they aren’t making any money off of it, and a lot of people understandably don’t trust them with that kind of power. I don’t have a problem with paid mods provided they ensure they are not going to meddle in the scene as it has existed for over a decade; as long as they aren’t going to try and come after people who create free alternatives or punish creators who don’t agree to “sign on” with them when offered.

But it’s as I said, the scene is fine as it is right now and most people, modders and mod creators agree to that notion. Bethesda is the only one wanting to change things, and that is immediately a concern for their intentions, given their history.

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bobfish

This isn’t surprising, the ESO consistently makes them money, but TES6 would only make them money in the first year (of a significant amount).

Just looks at Star Wars, since SWTOR came out there hasn’t been another single player SW RPG. And GTA is also a good example, since the success of GTA Online there has been no single player content added to the game.

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draugris

What a pity, i would love to see them working on a new TES single player. Measured on the success of Skyrim and the enormous active modding community it has i think it would have great potential to succeed.

Xijit
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Xijit

I am sure that they are working on a TES themed clone of ARK / Conan Exiles instead of TES 6.

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GiantsBane

Could be good if they don’t make it a steaming pile like they’ve let ZoS turn ESO into.

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George

Yeah… one of the most successful and played MMO on the market… How dare they!

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agemyth 😩

No, I will not pay for mods through a Bethesda storefront. I don’t want or need your curation and console friendly filtering to help me find high quality mods. Get your money grubbing hands out of their pockets because modders have been keeping your games relevant and fueling millions of sales for over a decade.

Donating to your favorite mod makers should be encouraged (like Nexus Mods gives creators the option to do). Bethesda does not deserve a percentage because they already make theirs on the game sale.

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PurpleCopper

Oh god, don’t tell me that development time for Elder Scrolls 6 was spent on ESO?!

It takes them nearly 4-5 years just to make an Elder Scrolls game, it’s gonna take fucking forever now.

They really want to milk ESO for all it’s worth before making Elder Scrolls 6, otherwise everybody’s just going to ignore ESO.

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Chuck Finley

ESO isn’t made by Bethesda. It’s more likely they’re working on Starfield, the rumored sci-fi RPG (i.e. Fallout/TES in spaaaaaaaaaace). I mean, obviously they’re not working on Fallout 5 yet…

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Armsbend

I never once thought Valve and Bethesda wouldn’t go back to the drawing board to re-market paid mods. It was always the plan.

I’m kinda done with Bethesda. I can live without their games.

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Arktouros

They basically can’t sell another TES game because it would pretty much outright destroy ESO.

Tizmah
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Tizmah

That’s like saying Final Fantasy XV would kill Final Fantasy XIV. Haha, it’s such a silly argument.

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Arktouros

I suppose that begs the question how many Final Fantasy players were upset with the way FFXIDLCMCDMLLIV was designed compared to the normal games? Because that’s the fundamental issue you got going on with ESO. One of the most consistent and solid criticisms is that it’s essentially not a TES game but rather another type of game set in the TES universe.

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Chuck Finley

I’m pretty sure that’s not the issue. ESO is made by another team, and I don’t know about you, I played WoW at the same time as Skyrim. So, I don’t see why anyone thinks TES VI would kill ESO at all.

It’s more likely they want to birth a new IP, which I don’t blame them. Hopefully Starfield.

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Castagere Shaikura

But why should they waste time and money on TES6 now that ESO is doing so well for them. All they have to do is take TES6 idea’s and break them up into small dlc packs and make more money than they would with a new single player game. Clockwork city was part of the TES3 Tribunal xpack and now they are selling it as dlc in ESO. Same with the Thieves guild dlc. They won’t have to make a TES6 for years as long as ESO is doing well.

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Arktouros

Playing WOW and Skyrim is a lot different than playing ESO and TES6. Their entire Morrowind expansion is built on the backbone of TES nostalgia and to attract those players.

More over it’s kinda funny how quickly people forget the kind of state ESO launched in and it basically was limping along there for the better part of a year at launch and it really wasn’t until One Tamriel late last year that general perceptions about the game really started to change. You can literally go through mounds of responses, feedback and complaints about how just little of a TES game that ESO was and people looking for multiplayer Skyrim is still referenced to this day. You give those people a proper TES6 game they basically have zero reason to play ESO.

They’ll have no problems birthing a new IP but I really wouldn’t expect them to abandon their twin pillars of Fallout or TES anytime soon. Those games are basically licenses to print money. You just can’t have one title taking away business from another, especially when that title’s monetization is built around keeping people in game and spending money.

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Koshelkin

PC Beta for console release. Got to say, though, the core of the game was there and solid. It was just the absence of significant updates until the console version was released which really bothered me.

When all is said and done… I don’t play ESO anymore. The PvP is shite and that won’t change. Ever. Their combat design just doesn’t allow it.

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Alex Js.

Paid mod store (personally I don’t care for it as I don’t find single-player game mods “enhancing” my game experience in any meaningful way), more “Skyrim for Xbox/PS4/Switch/TI-84 Plus graphing calculator”, more “Wolfenstein” milking (which STILL doesn’t even have any fun multiplayer part, something the previous RtCW was extremely well-known for), no announcement of next TES/FO/”brand-new IP” title, extremely boring and cringeworthy (especially the concluding part of it, with something about “dropping acid” and “fucking bananas”) E3 presentation… Looks like Bethesda/ZeniMax aren’t really doing well in terms of finances and can’t even afford expanding their current workforce anymore.

Hopefully they’ll still have some money left to keep themselves afloat for a little bit longer and finally START the development of next AAA-grade titles some time later. If not (if they’ll continue their decline into oblivion) – no big deal, there’s always CD Projekt RED, as well as many other great game studios all over the world who are still capable of creating immersive, beautiful adventure/role-playing games, using modern game engines and not being afraid of coming up with more unique “universes”/IPs ;-)

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zeko_rena

That is a shame because the MMO is shite

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Chuck Finley

While I am not a dedicated player of the MMO, I can say this is not true. It’s a solid game. Not a great MMO, not a great ES game; however, it can fill the gap while you wait on TES VI. The story is pretty solid overall.

And let’s be fair, it seems likely they’re working on Starfield, so that’s good. New IP is better than sticking to the same old stuff.

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Schmidt.Capela

however, it can fill the gap while you wait on TES VI.

Highly subjective; that would be like saying Fallout Shelter could fill the gap between FNV and FO4. I particularly find doing a new run of TES III: Morrowind a better use of my entertainment time than playing ESO: Morrowind.

ESO is not, and can never be, a true Elder Scrolls game. It doesn’t scratch the same itch at all.

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Nick

meh, i never found the story that engaging.
The fake ‘make a class but not really’ stuff was quite a let down as well except for maybe the option to switch in a weapon that allows you to heal. Combat in general was pretty gutted. While a well placed attack would drop an enemy in one hit on other TES games on ESO you are lucky if such effort gets a relevant trash mob down in 3 hits. Its like they forced oblivion through a typical MMO template meat grinder.

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Phubarrh

Wonder if they’ve come up with a solid process yet to ensure that the people selling mods are actually the ones who created them.

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Chuck Finley

Well, if you read the FAQ, you have to apply to be a partner with them. The stuff has to be new and original. So, I think that part will be fine.

I’m still against the idea, though. If you want to provide the community with these things and sell them while paying the “modders”…then hire them and make a team that constantly works on new DLC for your games.

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rafael12104

A few thoughts.

So, I’ve been keeping up with E3 livestreams this year and it must be said, Bethesda aka Bethsoft had the worst presser by far. They started 2 hours late and then basically mailed it in. The could have just hit vid play on time, with no one presenting and it would have been better received.

And part of the debacle was Creation Club. The concept was barely explained and short on details. Many walked away from the presentation thinking that it’s purpose was to cherry pick the best mods, pull them off the mod lists and make them Bethesda property which gamers can then buy. Sure, they will work with a few modders but the rest of us? Pay up for FO.

Details were important here, as part of the show. Focus on community and partnership was important. Also, it was important to show how this will better the games and not just line Beth’s pockets.

Last, Morrowind got a mention. A good mention with action and youtubers reactions. But again, with such a superficial look and no details on what gamers were getting, many were left with no desire to know more or have a look at it. The broader gamer audience just chalked it up to something else that was launched this year as filler.

Good job Bethesda… wonderful. After 2 years of pressers which were undoubtedly best in show, you’ve come back with a version of “we don’t want to be here so watch these vids and get out!”

Brendan Drain
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Brendan Drain

Agreed, it wasn’t explained well enough and it doesn’t help that “Creation Club” sounds like something universal that anyone can join just like the previous attempt to create a paid mod market. They should really have given it a more descriptive name like “Curated Mods” or “Professional Mods” and really hammered home the point that these are mods that will be co-developed with the game devs and run though all of their internal processes.

Any Skyrim PC modder knows how much work there is even in just getting multiple mods to play nice with each other. Getting the devs to curate an official mod repository and get directly involved in development of them is basically the only way console players will be able to get a lot of mods working. The consoles also charge devs for publishing updates and DLC, so there had to be some kind of charge in place. Not sure what people were expecting, but the backlash online seemed like a knee-jerk reaction.

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Sally Bowls

1) I did not even understand the pushback on the Steam stuff, so I agree with a lot of the “folks, just calm down.”

OTOH, I am shocked at what you describe – “mods that will be co-developed with the game devs and run through all of their internal processes.” is a lot for the devs to be signing up for. TBH, if they are going to do that, it seems to me that BS should just license the mod and pay the dev a royalty. I hope and expect that something along these lines will occur, but I worry this version may not be all the way there.

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BalsBigBrother

The push back for the steam incarnation was mainly down to a lack of oversight.

People taking mods they didn’t make and putting them up for sale with a slightly changed name but everything else including screenshots used to advertise it exactly the same. So the onus was then on the original mod author to chase these down on a case by case basis when they would obviously prefer to be actually making mods.

Also some thought the way the monies were divided didn’t properly compensate the mod authors for their work with steam in particular getting more than a lot of people thought they warranted.

This scheme on the face of it seems to have the first point covered with Bethesda taking on the role of curators but it remains to be seen how diligent they will be in that role. Also missing at this point is the actual payment details and how monies will be divided up but hopefully with only two points of contact, the mod creator(s) and Bethesda, it will be a more equitable relationship.

Time will tell I guess

Brendan Drain
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Brendan Drain

Licensing the mod and then paying the dev a royalty sounds like exactly what they’re planning to do, though. The mod will probably become property of Bethesda and the royalty will be a cut of sales, which is pretty standard for this type of scheme. Valve do the same thing with CS gun skins, where people produce the skins and submit them for consideration and the devs cherry pick their favourites to license.

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Sally Bowls

Cool! So this is actually much more sophisticated/involved than the Steam idea?

I like mods and hope it succeeds

Brendan Drain
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Brendan Drain

Yeah, it definitely sounds more involved than the Steam deal as Valve use it mostly for crowdsourcing cosmetic skins for loot boxes. Bethesda can use it to produce much larger scale gameplay mods, hopefully they do put in the effort to do this

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Hirku

Unless there’s a month-long trial to make sure the mod works and a money-back guarantee if/when Bethesda’s regular patching breaks it, they can stick their paid mods where the sun don’t shine. I never finished Skyrim because their last patch broke the lip syncing and they just said “We’re done” and went off to make F4.

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BalsBigBrother

I am willing to give the creation club a chance and have no issue with paying mod authors for their work indeed I have donated to several already via the Nexus mod site as it is.

I hope the creation club will be a place that promotes mods like Enderal that offer a large chunk of content that does a lot to extend the lifespan of its respective base game. My worry is that we are going to be flooded with single armour retextures for silly prices and it would be a bit of a waste if that was the case imo.

The Nexus site and the like will still exist and will still offer free mods but I hope people won’t forget that donating is still an option on that site too. If you can’t donate at least throw the mod author and endorsement and a quick thank you in their comments.

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Greaterdivinity

I’m pretty cool with the Creation Club, myself. A Bethesda-run tightly controlled, curated storefront that requires their signoff before content can make it on? Right on, I’m cool with giving modders the ability to potentially monetize some of their work (since there’s a whole lot of stuff that will never be approved for one reason or another). Also, sounds super similar to the Foundry content that players create for DBG, to add another bit to your list of comparisons.

Modding will still exist as it is now, and any modders who want to continue to create and release their content for free will be able to do so.

Granted, I’m a super casual modder and don’t have the perspective of the hardcore, dedicated modding community, but overall it seems good to me both for consumers and for Bethesda as a company.

Saebira
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Saebira

Modders will likely make an abysmal cut, though. Majority of profits will go to Bethesda.

A lot of modders accept donations for their work, so I’d rather give the people who actually made the mod the full credit and money.

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Greaterdivinity

We don’t know that yet. If they do get a super small cut, I totally see them continuing to release the mods for free and soliciting donations instead, as that may still generate more revenue for them.

But I see no issue with supporting both the creator of the mod, and the company that made the game that you’re modding, as well as maintained support for extensive modding and created a curated “hub” where paid mods can exist and be safely purchased and used by folks that don’t want to deal with figuring out how to get mods working through third parties like Nexus (not that it’s terribly difficult by any means).

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