The Daily Grind: Have you ever fallen for an MMO after giving it a second chance?

It’s no secret that there are a lot of games out there I fell for on my first try (Final Fantasy XI, World of Warcraft, Final Fantasy XIV, Star Trek Online), but you know what game I couldn’t stand when I first played it? City of Heroes. I played, thought it totally missed what would have made a superhero MMO fun, and left it behind with a sense of bitter disappointment. It was several months before I gave it another shot; when I did, it was lover at second sight.

This is not entirely foreign to me; my first impression of The Elder Scrolls Online was definitely negative, but going back to it produced much warmer feelings. Then again, there are games which I don’t care for much on my first try that later do nothing to change my mind. What about you, dear readers? Have you ever fallen for an MMO after giving it a second chance? And if so, have you found it has more to do with changes to the game or with yourself?

Every morning, the Massively Overpowered writers team up with mascot Mo to ask MMORPG players pointed questions about the massively multiplayer online roleplaying genre. Grab a mug of your preferred beverage and take a stab at answering the question posed in today’s Daily Grind!
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41 Comments on "The Daily Grind: Have you ever fallen for an MMO after giving it a second chance?"

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Alex Malone

Has never happened to me so far with an MMO. The problems I have with MMOs tend to be very fundamental (crap IP, poor combat mechanics, lack of pvp) and never get changed, so when I go back (if at all…) all the same problems are still there.

It has happened to me a few times with single player games, typically games that require some sort of time investment before things get fun – like a lot of RPGs, or the Deus Ex games.

Karma_Mule
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Karma_Mule

This hasn’t happened with an actual true MMO, but it did with a kinda/sorta/partial one: Destiny

I played it at launch, got to max level and instantly felt the grind. The skimpy story and awkward segregation of lots of the lore to grimoire cards on the web also contributed to that alienation.

I came back earlier this year w/all the expansions/DLC in place and am having a blast. More story, more things to do, a refined loot system make it very much more fun to play, and got me very excited for Destiny 2. If they fix the weird bifurcation of lore (which it sounds like they have) and live up to at least SOME of their hype on the increased emphasis on story then I’ll be very happy.

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MesaSage

Not yet, and I’ve given several of them second chances. Usually I stop playing them for good reasons and unless those reasons change dramatically, it’s not worth trying.

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theblackmage75

It took more than one look to finally make me a fan of ESO. I played the beta, bought it at launch, and after a couple months dropped it. The gameplay systems felt convoluted with too many poorly explained choices to make: character archetype, attributes, weapons, armor type, skill lines, morphs, crafting, etc. The necessity of creating mules for crafting, combined with basic ES features like theft and housing missing drove me away.

But after One Tamriel showed up I gave the game another chance and once the crafting bag was added as a sub perk I finally felt the draw to invest some serious time to figure out the parts that had been daunting. The game still has its flaws but it’s one that has become my mainstay and an all-time favorite.

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Armsbend

Never once.

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Rolan Storm

It looks like that’s all I do lately.

ESO
My words about TES series were this: ‘the moment TES MMORPG launches – I am there’. And I was. Lasted for two weeks tops. I came back with ‘Tamriel Unlimited’ and stayed ever since.

SWTOR
There were a ton of things I did not like about SWTOR when it launched, though I finished some character’s stories. These days game is so different it hardly believable. And while a lot of people try to disregard SWTOR as a MMORPG, criticizing it for ease of leveling and lack of group dependency I’ll take SWTOR that is over SWTOR that was any day.

TSW/SWL
Well, I do not know if that qualifies. But TSW was hard and I – while appreciating something hardcore for a change – was not ready for that. I droped out first time htitting not even Blue Mountain, but Savage Coast wall. Second time was better, I finished all base content up to Tokyo excluding Issues – but it still was not something I have connection with. These days I love the ride, I love how they changed schools (Blood Magic became exactly how I envisioned it) and I can concentrate on investigation/thinking instead of skills and abilities. That’s how I like it at least.

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Vellik

There have been many games that I’ve given second, third, or even fourth chances.

I’d tried to get into EVE a few times, with my longest stint lasting a year. I just couldn’t stick with it with the way I wanted to play.

WoW was what I would call the first and only time I’ve been addicted to a game, and my longest stint with that was roughly seven years. That was from the beginning, though, so I don’t think that counts.

What does count is ESO. With ESO, I was incredibly hyped for it. I had no disillusions that it would be Skyrim online; I knew that this would be an MMO with TES themes and lore, but I just didn’t know how it would play out. Cue the beta. During the beta the game felt /very/ unfinished; Argonian NPCs on Bleakrock, as well as other races, didn’t even have their voice acting done yet, and essentially had Microsoft Sam or Sarah doing the voicework with an accent placed over it. The combat felt very, well, squishy. Nothing seemed to really feel like it had any impact when it hit an enemy. There were also simple bugs like a one inch high piece of stone preventing you from running up a ledge. I knew it was a beta, and I knew that it was unfinished. I also knew that it was an MMO first and a TES game second, but even knowing this, it still didn’t feel as full featured as a TES game. At the time, things like poisons weren’t in yet, and that was one of the main things I wanted to do: play a Bosmer bowman using poisons on his arrows, being stealthy, and doing raids with a guild in Cyrodiil.

After the beta, I ended up not buying the game. I think that by being in a guild pre-launch, and combined with the fact that there weren’t a lot of details about the game at the time, it kind of turned into an echo chamber of theories for what the game /could/ be, and I couldn’t dislodge the notion from my mind.

That being said, I gave the game a second chance. After a brief stint with Wildstar, and finding that didn’t stick with me, I joined the game in September of 2015. I joined up with a trade guild, my first guild in that game, and have been with them as my primary guild ever since. Not only did the team behind ESO seriously take feedback into consideration, they waged a virtual, and very public, war against bots and gold farmers. I remember reading about how a public dungeon would be filled with bots farming the bosses, and within 10 minutes of it being reported, a GM came in and nuked them all. That was a kind of response I had never seen to gold sellers before, and it was the kind of no-nonsense “we’ll not have you ruin this game” attitude that resonated with me — it felt like the they really cared about giving the game a good name after their rocky start.

It’s two years later, and I still see ESO as my main MMO. There’s been the B2P transition, the crown store and crown crates have been introduced, and a lot of other changes have taken place. Some for the worse, some for the better. This is the first MMO I can truly say that I’ve made friends in, and the community, if you know where to look, can be outstanding and helpful (just don’t let zone chat color your impressions. It’s Barrens chat in every game). The game, for the most part, is bot free, and you will never see gold sellers risk advertising in game. On top of that, the game has many more features now than it did at launch — housing, poisons were added, a robust (for an MMO) thieving system with the Thieves Guild, the Dark Brotherhood, and the removal of vet ranks and limitations restricting where you could go in the world. It’s two years later, and I see myself sticking around for quite some time.

Emmanuel Carabott
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Emmanuel Carabott

Ohh man the original Guildwars, it was a perfect storm… tried the trial period, didnt get a lot of time to play, had a lot of heavy baggage from player feedback with a lot of people arguing that game was basically aimed at PVP, didnt have much PVE content (only 20 levels an such) and what little I played it felt ordinary so when the trail ended I let it go. fast forward a couple of years later I came across the game heavily discounted some $5 or so, I was bored didnt have anything to play said to myself what have I got too loose, turns out nothing cause as faith would have it had i played the trail just 15 minutes more I would have come across this quest where an NPC asks you to help him get some spider eggs or something and while in every MMO I had every played said NPC would wait patiently until you get those Eggs for him, to my amazement this digital guy came along for the ride and did his part. I was sold and from that moment on the Guild wars franchise became my favorite and still is to this day. At least I learned a valuable lesson, popular opinion isnt always right.

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Little Bugbear

When I first tried Aion I hated it. I only played one MMO at a time back then. So if it wasn’t WoW I didn’t like it. After I started playing multiply MMO’s I gave Aion an thought it was a great game. My first impression of Aion taught me that fangirling over a game so much that you think you can only like one, will ultimately cause you to miss out on great games.

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Suikoden

Great question. That happened one time for me and it was with Neverwinter. I wasn’t very into it at launch, but I kept hearing good things about it. I gave it another try about a year later, and played it religiously for three years.
I have returned to games in the past, but usually it’s the other way around; I leave at the height of my play there and come back to dabble. But this is the one example where I just dabbled, and then came back and went all in.