The Daily Grind: Is there any hope for WildStar?

It’s no secret that WildStar has, for the duration of its existence, underperformed and struggled to find a large and steady audience. Even with the free-to-play transition, multiple updates, and a softening up of its super-duper hardcore approach, WildStar has not been able to succeed in the way that the studio and its community had hoped.

In fact, it surprises a lot of people that it hasn’t been given a pink slip by parent publisher NCsoft, especially after seeing the MMO slip in revenue consistently over the past couple of years. Yet it survives, and for as long as it does, there might be hope for a future for this sci-fi game.

What do you think? Is there any hope for WildStar in 2017? Do you think that NCsoft is holding off on the execution order because it has actual plans for the game? What do you think Carbine needs to do to grow and nurture this title so that it may escape the shadow of perceived doom?

Every morning, the Massively Overpowered writers team up with mascot Mo to ask MMORPG players pointed questions about the massively multiplayer online roleplaying genre. Grab a mug of your preferred beverage and take a stab at answering the question posed in today’s Daily Grind!
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119 Comments on "The Daily Grind: Is there any hope for WildStar?"

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Malcolm Swoboda

Hope to be in top charts of anything other than niche concepts of MMORPGs? No.

Hope to be sustaining and profitable enough to run and occasionally (every several months?) add content? Maybe.

That said, I think I’ve figured out that its not a game for me. Between the art, the way that action is portrayed, the attitude it conveys, even the UI… nah. Seems only its background lore, and maybe not even that, is interesting to me.

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Geoffrey Smith

Nope.

Wait, I need to expand on this? Ok, fine…..

The problem with Wildstar was always that it was too much. On every level. It just has WAY too much going on visually, game play, and behind the scenes. It was exhausting and annoying to play. It is actually in a much better place now, and certainly the polish that went into it after launch has helped, but damn… there is no hope now. None.

I logged in a few weeks back and started playing solo a bit. It is actually much more fun now (and the housing is still so insanely enjoyable) but the game is super dead. It still has too much going on that it makes difficult to follow, and it is so behind the 8-ball I can’t imagine it turning around.

Its amazingly sad to me, cause all the potential is/was there, but it just got wrecked by a combination of things (some of them not even the games fault). C’est le vive….

Reader

Let me stop you right there. Wildstar is not, I repeat, it is NOT a sci-fi MMO. It’s a mashup of sci-fi and fantasy in a highly stylized (and completely unbelievable) universe. It is it’s own thing, so for the love of all that is good and holy, please do not feed into the myth that it is a ‘sci-fi’ game. It is not. Magic exists alongside the sci-fi elements in Wildstar.

As for your topic, the very thing I just said is part of what is hurting Wildstar. It’s wildly imaginative, but suffers a massive identity crisis as well. It wants to be new, and yet be ‘old-school’ all at the same time. And the result? That image of the school principal dressed in what he perceives to be ‘cool’ and ‘hip’ clothes of the time going ‘How do you do, fellow kids?’. (ref: http://knowyourmeme.com/memes/how-do-you-do-fellow-kids ). In short, it tried to do too many things at once, and came up short on all of them and lost its audience. I don’t even think they knew what their intended audience wanted, or even who they were. I know initially I thought I was the intended audience, and I bailed out before my trial subscription was done. I was too ‘casual’ for the game. And now, it’s too late, even if they fixed it. I went back no less than _3_ times to try their adjustments, and found them lackluster each time. It’s not going to happen again.

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Jeremy Barnes

Ahh, it’s that time again. Another what’s happening with a game that’s not popular, wasn’t popular and will never be popular, but gets more coverage than most popular games.

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John Mynard

Wildstar’s strengths are its offbeat humor, character design, and high concept narrative. I mean, hell, I’ve been saying since it came out that it’s Don Bluth meets Heavy Metal in game form.

This seems remarkably appropriate:

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John Mynard

Wish the chat system would parse media links…

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be rational

I’ve been playing Wildstar from the beginning and play casually now. I enjoy it even though I know it might not last long. I hope they can turn it around through a console port or some clever marketing campaign. At the very least I hope they are getting a profit! There is only one server now but for me personally that aspect makes it feel like a closer community although I know lack of population and what not make it off putting to others.

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Eduardo da Fonseca

They could shut it down and bring city of heroes back with carbine. But as it is ncsoft they will pull the plug. Haven’t done it yet just because closing CoH was so bad for them that they keep with it.

possum440 .
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possum440 .

When people try a game and the devs do not listen to what the core players want, that is SOLO players that party occasionally, then they try it and leave, and never come back.

The result is the lifers that live in MMO’s cannot sustain the game and it slowly degenerates and ultimately ends up shutting down.

The entire time the devs and hired researchers are pointing fingers at each other when, in the first place, all they had to do was what their customers wanted, not what the devs and researchers wanted.

The lifers in MMO’s that live on partying up and running really stupid multiple player raids for idiotic carrots cannot sustain a game through numbers after the majority has left.

WoW has players that are aging and finally figuring out that hanging on to a character because of time invested isn’t worth it, never has been. But it has taken a good chunk of their lives to finally figure it out. One reason even the king is slowly fading away.

Games like wildstar will never get that chance because……devs being devs.

oldandgrumpy
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oldandgrumpy

Wildstar has had two chances and I cannot see it getting a third.

It is one of the few MMO’s that I did not get my character to max level and left me with very negative feeling towards the game, developers and studio. I often wonder what all the ego’s are doing for a crust these days.

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Jeremy Barnes

taking someone else’s money (probably Amazon’s) to make a game that is really the game they envisioned because the last game that they had influence on wasn’t really their game because of mysterious “reasons”.

Mewmew
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Mewmew

I think that anybody who has any interest in the game better go play it now, not keep it on the back burner as something they want to try one day. Before you know it it will be gone and a lot of people will be saying “Darn I really wanted to try that.” Try it now while it’s around. There’s a lot of interesting stuff to play through and see.

Though if Secret World can struggle along with it’s poor revenue (and even get a re-launch while keeping the original game there for now), maybe this one can make it a while more as well.

Still better safe than sorry – anybody even remotely interested needs to try it now!

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Raimo Kangasniemi

The only hope I can see for the title is to somehow open new markets for it.

It’s a shame, but its basic problem in my opinion is that it’s a game that launched several years ‘too late’; it was made to markets as they were when its development began.

It was launched as a Vanilla-Warcraft-In-Space and if it would have been launched in let’s say 2010 or so, it would have rocked the genre.

N7 Spectre
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N7 Spectre

Wildstar should have started like GW2. Make leveling super easy and slowly increase the difficulty over time with expansions. A hard game I might make a main and maybe one alt. An easy game I will usually level every class and stick with my favorite part of the game until the next expansion.

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Terren Bruce

Wildstar stopped having a future when NCSoft fired the large team making the eastern port instead of reassigning them to making a console port. That was the moment NCSoft stopped caring about getting something back for their investment in the game.

I think now Wildstar only exists so as not to scare western players from GW2 and B&S. They can point to Wildstar and say “if we’re keeping even Wildstar up then you can count on GW2 and B&S having full support for years to come”.

Richard de Leon III
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Richard de Leon III

I still play Wildstar casually, and i love it. IMHO the main issue with getting enough players to play is the danger of it closing down at any point. Why invest any time in a game that may close down at any time? Its simply has too tainted a reputation at this point and having NCsoft as the boss doesnt help with their own CoH fiasco.

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Crowe

Maybe the reason NCSoft is keeping it around is so they don’t get accused by us of closing another slightly profitable game too early? Like City of Heroes. (of course, even though I enjoyed Wildstar, it was nothing like CoH in its appeal) Anyways, I’ve wondered for a while now why they hadn’t just shut it down.

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Nathan Aldana

wildstar honestly shot itself in the foot by making a game that was fun, vibrant, deeply charming, and accessible to casuals..only for when you hit max level for it to become very apparent they expected everyone to suck it up cupcake and become hardcore raiders who enjoyed pushing progression content day and night.

The casual fanbase was never going to do that, and the hardcore raiders would never have suffered their raid content to be made more accessible, leading to a game that nobody was happy with.

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Sally Bowls

1) Redux: For me, Wildstar was an unsuccessful blend of two games: a retro #Hardcore game and a game I was so excited to play with loads of personality & humor, 3 of 4 paths were not warrior, …

2) I am sure NCSoft regrets doing WS, but it is a big company and I doubt the Carbine staff is
that expensive for a large company. So Wildstar can be around for as long as NCSoft cares to keep it. If a NCSoft exec really likes the game (or is sleeping with and/or blackmailed by a Carbine employee,) it can stay around.

3) My vote is Q4. IIRC, NCSoft says their fiscal year ends in March but they do calendar year staffing plans. So as they look at the spreadsheets for ’18, they will be deciding whether to trim the resources of WS and ANet. My second pick in the deadpool would be Q4 ’19.

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Jay Madison

Consoles are Wildstar’s only hope.

Specifically Xbox One, where there is less major competition.

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Rottenrotny

It’s a solid game, if I wasn’t already involved in so many other games annnnd it didn’t look like a cartoon I’d probably be interested.

But honestly I can’t get past the Saturday morning cartoon aesthetics.

I also agree that a strong hype campaign –>>> move to consoles could be really good for the game.

Estranged
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Estranged

Consoles

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Alex Malone

There is no hope for Wildstar in it’s current form.

An MMO lives or dies with it’s community, but Wildstar has never hit the required number to generate a self-sustaining community. Word of mouth has not been kind to the game and with not many people playing, you aren’t being invited by your friends to try it out.

I also don’t think it is something Carbine can fix. There is simply too much wrong with the core game that it would be impossible to solve all the problems. Whether it is the cartoon art style, the cheesy humour, the linear zones, the generic quests, the stale trinity design, the terrible UI, the easy/hardcore difficulty split, the IP, the spammy combat system……there is just too much wrong that it drives people away.

I don’t even think that any of these issues by themselves are that bad, you can probably overlook a few of them, its just the fact that there are so many issues that you suffer death from a thousand cuts.

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Greaterdivinity

Sadly…without a big reinvestment from NCsoft to do some major polish work on the game, release it on new platforms/in new regions, and launch a big “relaunch” marketing initiative, probably.

The game has languished for too long now, and nothing Carbine did really turned things around during the early days before NCsoft really started pulling back from the game. By now they’re still losing what few folks they have left at the studio, and aren’t really able to support the game too much as a result. I’m surprised they have anyone still working on the game, to be honest.

By now I would have figured they’d have worked to put it in maintenance mode a la GW1 (leverage Anet’s help with that), closed down what remained of Carbine, and called it a day until they could replace it with another Western title. I can see why they’d want to keep it alive to protect their brand in the West (in that it does less damage than closing it outright), but I’m surprised at how long they strongly supported it for after launch, and that they’re still keeping anyone even working on the game.

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Vlad Petrescu

Short Answer : No ! its a stinking pile of poop ! Just like all of the genre ! :)

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Rumm

Unfortunately, barring some large investment and a Wildstar redux a’la FFXIV, I have no reason to ever return to the game. It was, in the time that I played it, probably my favorite MMO to date. Unfortunately, the dwindling playerbase made it more and more difficult to play every day, to the point where I gave up on 30 minute queues on my healing class to search for greener pastures.

Wildstar in my mind failed for a few reasons.

1) A 40 man raid following a 20 man intro raid necessitated guild poaching or mergers, meaning that the raiding community was forced to cannibalize itself just to see new content. I was in the best guild in the world, and even we couldn’t field a full roster most nights, regardless of how low our recruitment standards got.

2) Carbine blatantly lied to its community about how much content they had prepared prior to launch. There just wasn’t enough content to keep people in the game. 4 dungeons, 2 of which were just harder versions of leveling dungeons, and 1 actually accessible raid is not enough for a game was in development for 9 years. We were told to expect content updates every month, and then every quarter, and then whenever they got around to it. There’s been what, 1 new dungeon and 1 new raid since the game launched? System changes aren’t enough to keep people playing after they’ve done the same dungeons a million times already.

I personally love the art style and loot explosions. It feels like a game. It reminded me of Jak and Daxter in MMO form. The combat remains the best in any MMO that I’ve yet played, and every game that launches from this point forward should have double jump. The game did some things very well, and I hope that someone is capable of salvaging or borrowing its concepts down the road.

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Crowe

I definitely agree with you on #1. I would have preferred 10-man stuff with 20-man being the next step up. (and I wouldn’t have done the 20-man stuff anyway)
My memories for #2 aren’t as firm as yours — I really don’t remember much about their promises but I do remember the hype…

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Don Nascimento

No.

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Theodrax

Truth be told, I kind of liked Wildstar. Once you ignored all the raid crap. I’m staying away now for two big reasons. One really just effects me. I have a visual impairment, so they’re reliance on visuals and telegraphs doesn’t work well for me. That’s a personal thing though, and I accept they can’t necessarily cater to my impairment. The other thing is just the Sword of Damocles hanging over it. I don’t want to go back to a game that looks like its about to die. I realize that could be a self fulfilling prophecy. People won’t go back because it looks like it’s going to die, so it can’t get people and it dies. That said, my time is limited and I’m here for my enjoyment not the games benefits so I’ll probably continue to stay away.

wandris
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wandris

Wildstar’s problem was that it tried to serve 2 separate audiences and failed to do either well. Outside of endgame the entire game was piss easy, outside of the main body of the game you hit a wall of jarring difficulty. From there it snowballed. Problems were not and perhaps could not be adequately addressed in a timeframe that would salvage a critical mass of players.

Now though? Things are better from what I can tell but I doubt it could ever attract a larger audience due to the damage to its reputation and relative age. Many, newer, and better games out there. Confidence is another matter, hard to spend much time or real money into a game that looks to be next in line for the gallows.

Had they made the entire game “hardcore” that may have been better. I do not think people need to be a hardcore gamer to enjoy difficult content. Had the overall curve been smoother the main body of the game would have been challenging and engaging enough to keep people around long enough to fully give endgame the time it deserved.

What could save Wildstar now is an unequivocal statement from NCsoft that Wildstar will remain available for no less than 10+ years. NCsofts track record for shutting down underperforming games makes it very difficult to justify spending time or money in a game that could be shut down in a month. Personally I may at most try to level a character or two just to get a final experience, but I could not justify any commitment to a game with such a dubious future.

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Space Captain Zor

If Disney buys it, makes it a sandbox, and renames it WildStarWars :D

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Redbeard

I’ve come a long way with regards to Wildstar. In the Beta, I couldn’t get around the “Space Texas” vibe that it offered. When it went F2P, I gradually became accustomed to Wildstar’s aesthetics, but I wasn’t sure if the story would hold up to the traditional MMO quest system that Wildstar embraced. Once I hit around L25-30 or so, however, the story took off and I wanted to see where it ended. But eventually I hit that post F2P endgame wall and had to regretfully back off. (I’d hate to have seen what the endgame wall was like pre-F2P.)

When I look at Wildstar now, I think of a great story that got lost in the urge to recreate what a small subset of MMO players felt were the glory days of Vanilla WoW. Wildstar isn’t irredeemable, but it does need to acknowledge that non-raiders are the key to their survival and to de-emphasize traditional raids accordingly. Backing off from some of the intensity isn’t a bad thing either, because the casual player can be put off by the constant “go go go” mentality that Wildstar demands. A new casual player with completionist tendencies and be overwhelmed by everything that Wildstar throws at you in much the same way a new player to Rift can be overwhelmed by their inability to “clear” a zone of rifts.

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A Dad Supreme

When I look at Wildstar now, I think of a great story that got lost …”
======
This is where the game lost me. As someone who absolutely loves lore/story, I never thought Wildstar had a great story, but was rather average.

I only pushed onto 50 just to see what was there after I lost interest. Didn’t seem very original as a plotline.

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Redbeard

As much as the Wildstar story had its issues, at least it’s a more coherent story than what, say, TERA has.

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Oleg Chebeneev

I dont think so. Wildstar had many chances and if even F2P switch didnt help, its game over. My biggest issue with Wildstar is that its not fun to level. Quests are just too generic and outdated, and font is hard to read. Also I deslike cartoonish style, its why I never could get into SWToR also.

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A Dad Supreme

“THE DAILY GRIND: IS THERE ANY HOPE FOR WILDSTAR?”
==========

There is always hope.

Just ask any delusional person and they’ll tell you so.

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Utakata

Welp…to answer today’s DG, I first need to know how bad it is in the first place. And all I have currently to go on is this:

NCsoft Q2 2017 financials: Guild Wars 2 drops to new all-time low, Blade and Soul heads to console

…where WildStar didn’t get mentioned at all. Or is it because they didn’t get mentioned at all is the “how bad it is in the first place”? :(

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Serrenity

I think a few reports ago, they stopped reporting on WS financials individually and put it in a more generic, what amounts to “Other monies” bucket.

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Sally Bowls

Yep. Starting with the Feb earnings call.
The last we got was

WSq3.PNG
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Mark Mealman

This is a game I wanted to love. I like the story, setting, class concepts, art style, how they have multiple types of dungeon systems, a group finder for each, solid housing, crafting, etc. The problem is that certain core design concepts got in the way of my fun. First off the game feels like it caters to ADD people on crack. You walk into a brand new area wanting to dip your toes in and look around- “CHALLENGE STARTED!!!! Kill 20 BEEP-BOOS in 3 mins for reward. GO GO GOGOGOGOGOGO!!!”

Dungeons felt the same. The game is rush rush rush, limit limit limit, go go go, hardcore hardcore hardcore. There’s just way too much noise at every step you take. Even the first major city you hit at level 10-ish is a massive confusing mess of exclamation mark quest givers and on the fly quests slamming into your inbox/UI.

I don’t think you can fix those issues with a patch or expansion.

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Dread Quixadhal

Yep, this is exactly why I didn’t get hooked on it. I loved the game and gave it a solid chance at launch, and then again when it went free-to-pay. I thought maybe it just felt too much like GW2, but no…. it’s the fact that there’s no sense of a WORLD to explore.

You’re bouncing from one crisis point to the next, with nothing else to do. I’m an explorer type player, and always love climbing around the world, trying to get to places I probably shouldn’t, finding little hidden lore bits or cute things a dev put in just for amusement.

Wildstar doesn’t do that. Every inch of the map is driving you to DO something, rushing you to progress and hurry up so you can do the next things, and hit “endgame”. I don’t like endgame. Endless gear grinding is boring, so if the leveling part of the game tries to rush you along through it, the game itself feels rushed and shallow.

I don’t see any way they can “fix” that.

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Skardon

you know, I was never clear myself WS didn’t work for me, but after reading this, I realize this was the reason.

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Don Nascimento

This is EXACTLY why I think it failed. Remember that feeling when you first played WoW or LOTRO or any other big MMO? A large zone, with wilderness to explore and nice music. It was relaxing and didn’t have crap in your face every step you took.

Wildstar is the exact opposite, the bombastic music constantly, and everything else you mentioned. When I got home after a day of work, the last thing I wanted to do was walk into Wildstar’s stressful world..

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Wanda Clamshuckr

Raids didn’t kill it. Like in other MMO’s, there’s the 10% that actively seek that style of gaming, and an even narrower percentage that consider themselves the “hardcore elite”. Those needs were met in WildStar.

What killed it was the gaming experience for the 90% of the rest of the population. Very generic quests, overly-blown and loud delivery system for ..everything.. coupled with cheese-laden humor, AND the onslaught of neon colors with hyper-cartoonized esthetic. Did I mention telegraph abuse, and frenetic combat?

It was too much, all the time. For the first couple of weeks it was an exciting thrill-ride, then it wore on me until I felt exhausted. A weekend in Vegas is thrilling. A month in Vegas makes you want to run away screaming.

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Utakata

That’s quite subjective though. As you can tell by the color and girth of my pigtails that I like the, “…cheese-laden humor, AND the onslaught of neon colors with hyper-cartoonized esthetic.” Very much so.

That said, I think it was the fact that Carbine asked us all to take it all very seriously (ie, hardcore, cupcake) when the game was first released. When players showed up to have a good time, they where met with “this is *raid or die” browbeater bat…from the first time one steps out of the start zones, all the way to endgame. From that I am pretty sure hyper cartoony element with all it’s blasting colors didn’t help. If not completely disconcerting for many. Unfortunately, that left a legacy with WildStar they still haven’t been able to shake to this day.

*Note: I am not claiming raids drove players away. Raids that are designed well and is not the focus of the game would of likely have enhanced the game’s stickiness. Instead, it was the “hardcore, cupcake” mentality that was baked into most aspects of the game that included raiding. It was all too obnoxiously douchebro IMO, to put it mildly. /bleah

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Wanda Clamshuckr

Well, subjective or not, the game is a ghost town and the #1 or #2 common complaint is it’s esthetic. So, some people might like it, but the majority of the gaming population didn’t.

“Raid or die” was just marketing, and didn’t affect the average gamer. The simple fact was, the bulk of the population that doesn’t raid is the one that supports the game. WildStar turned them off with their non-raid content and esthetic. You can’t pay the bills unless the larger demographic is willing to stick around and support the business.

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Ashfyn Ninegold

I honestly think you’re both right. I didn’t like the OVERLY cartoony graphics (unlike your tasteful display, Utakata), but I had no reason to endure what I didn’t like because the “raid or die” marketing convinced me that the game was designed significantly for group content and I didn’t want to play a game that marginalized solo players.

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Utakata

I’ll take both for each pigtail then. <3

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CapnLan

I actually don’t think it will shut down. If they haven’t pulled the plug by now then I don’t think they will. That said, I also don’t think it will really go anywhere. It will probably just chug along with a few minor updates and stay a relatively niche game sort of in the same way Champions Online does.

I gave it a shot a few times but it just never really grabbed me. It wasn’t any singular thing but rather the whole package that just didn’t appeal to me. From the art style to the wailing guitars/FUCK YEAH CUPCAKE whenever I leveled up just never worked. It was all just kind of…meh.

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Tithian

It could be rejuvenated if it had a niche or unique selling point, that could be promoted over a redesign (i.e. TSW with its story elements, relaunching as SWL). However it does not, thus it is doomed to die.

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Ashfyn Ninegold

Elitism works in sports because people are willing to pay to sit in the stands in order to be there when something heroic happens on the field. Then they can boast about having seen it when they go home.

Elitism does not work in games because MMOs are not spectator sports. So when you set up a high, thick wall and say only people good enough to get over this wall are good enough to play our game, you’re created a foregone conclusion. Yes, everyone will try to get over that wall to be elite, but only a very small number will make it, and even they might not like what’s on the other side. That’s my perception of what Wildstar did.

To turn it around, they need to be as loud and noisy with their new message as they were with the old one. They’ve done that to some extent, but not enough to make a dent in gamers who don’t slavishly (sorry overlord MOP) read gaming news.

What is their new message, by the way? How are they now presenting their game? Does anybody know?

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Sally Bowls

You need a marketing budget to present the game and I am not sure how much of that there is these days.

miol
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miol

Even if I belong to a minority that prefers fast cadence over expansions, I would normally suggest a juicy expansion with all its beneficial PR that the MMO audience normally goes behind it!

But when I now see other struggling MMOs like Rift, deciding to give out even their latest expansion for free, when they saw a considerable uptick with their free expansion weekend, I’m afraid this almost desperate approach has also only a very short-term effect!

So my suggestion would actually be to boldly go for Wildstar Vol. 2! ;P

-If NCsoft is willing to invest or even Kickstater, if they’re willing to stay 100% transparent, which would also totally help getting the much need trust from potential customers back, and now it seems Carbine’s management is capable enough of not scaring away talents anymore, if they start hiring again!

-Their IP-desgn is still awesome, but they can finally get rid of the old-fashioned but awkward factions. Actually make the Paths a viable alternative to generic questing. And combat feels still fresh enough!

-And they can still keep Wildstar 1 in “legacy mode”, where you are still able to go back and find things to import for your new housing and whatnot!

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Jack Pipsam

Maybe if NCsoft sells it to someone else? Who knows.

I mean it has made this far and it is still getting updates, which is in a way incredible. It’s the little engine that could!

But I think it’s the hardcore focus that killed it. I don’t think it’s the art-style, people love cute art-styles and bunnies. I think the instance focus on being a HARDCORE MMO RAIDING EPIC EXPERIENCE WHICH WILL TEST YOUR STEEL!!!!!!11111!!! turned many, like myself off.

Not to mention the change from the core cool idea of going out and doing stuff like being an adventure ended up meaning like nothing in the end, turning their cool concept into little more than a grindy gimmick which didn’t mean nothing by the end.

Perhaps there’s hope if they try and re-brand it down the line, maybe try to appeal more along the lines of the cuteness or even maybe see if furries are interested, but I think trying to cling to the idea of being a hardcore or even traditional MMO is hurting it.

Wildstar should instead embrace its biggest strengths, which is the interesting lore and aesthetic. It’s different and weird, that should be the focus, that should be the hook.
A Ratchet & Clank cross Phantasy Star thing with bunny girls.

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Danny Smith

No. Whats it got to salvage at this point? The brand name is both a joke and unrelated to an existing beloved ip so thats shot. The hardcore angles already been given up on. The ‘anime fan on promnight’ level dudebro none-medy humourfail is extremely off putting for many and the game itself is drip fed support and the player numbers are abysmal.

How do you save that with minuscule staff and resources left? because all the people left playing are screaming for a ‘do a ffxiv stlye redo’ like they have the ability to do so and they really dont. They dont even have the resources for what swtor pulled to get out of its ‘Tortanic’ death spiral.

I genuinely dont think theres any salvaging this one. I think best case scenario a year from now they announce they are using the assetts to make some moba or ‘hero combat game’ and it will exist in a permabeta for a year before shutting down then wildstar gets forgotten. Thats the absolute best case i can see happening.

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Carebear

I never managed to create a likeable character to play. My basic problem started from there..i didnt like any of the races and couldnt come up with a likeble character..

Then i also dont like ultra cartoon, humorous lore/story.

I am not hardcore player nor raider but i always find ways to enjoy new MMOs through leveling, crafting, housing, etc.

The hardcore raiding of wildstar is not the reason i dont like it.. and according to my small group of online mmo friends, the reasoning was the same…

I doubt that if wildstar become more casual will fix things… :(

deekay_plus
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deekay_plus

funny thing is post f2p (and for a while prior) wildstar offers a rich non raiding set of endgame activities. tho they still probably push dungeons/raids too hard to this day.

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Jeff

I just think what Wildstar could have been if they went with a light hearted casual approach…the subject matter and the elitist raid or die mentality was such a dichotomy, and the back pedaling on that came across as disingenuous and scamy. “We will let you into our exclusive club because we are actually good people “ The result is most everyone that wasn’t an elitist douchenozzel gave Carbine the finger.

NCsoft is just a perplexing company…they will kill a game that has a loyal yet Niche fan base , make Arenanet so nervous that they renegotiated their autonomy ….but Wildstar keeps kicking with all five players.

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Terren Bruce

I don’t think it’s perplexing. They just made a calculated decision that the minimal investment it takes to keep Wildstar running is worth avoiding their reputation taking another hit by closing down yet another game. How long that sentiment holds who knows?

deekay_plus
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deekay_plus

anet isn’t in the least autonomous to the degree suggested here. they are still wholly owned by ncsoft and always will be until ncsoft resells them. the self publishing was just another paper shuffle pr show that ncsoft has a history of doing and fooled no one familiar with ncsoft’s business side.

and wildstar has a loyal yet niche fanbase. if anything wildstar being open still is a pr show that they aren’t killing yet another game that isn’t doing that well for them – which has become a major part of the fan feedback/visible word of mouth in the past several years leading up and after wildstar’s launch.

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Melissa McDonald

Sometimes studying failure helps future titles and the long term.

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Duane Does not check email

I don’t think the industry does that nor do they stop coming up with new ways to disappoint players.

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Veldan

Judging by the MMOs released in the past decade, precious few have studied failure of what came before…

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Schmidt.Capela

The most impressive aspect of this is that devs not only often offer the exact same features that failed other games, they don’t even account for how or why those previous games failed. I mean, I believe features that failed in the past can usually be made successful with the correct approach, but devs often try the exact same failed feature with the exact same failed approach. It’s insanity in the “doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results” sense.

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Pandalulz

Unfortunately I don’t think there is any hope, it’s in a slow death spiral that I don’t think it’ll ever recover from. I’d like to see them do something with the IP though. I think if they toned down the humor a bit, fleshed out the lore some more, it could be a neat property to do something else with and start from scratch.

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Armsbend

none. Aging games don’t suddenly become hits. That said, enjoy it while it is around and leave the bean counting to the counters.

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mistressbrazen

I played Wildstar in beta. I was curious about it, but ended up uninstalling. The humor was grating, and I didn’t care for the combat either, or all the, way too vibrant for my taste, colors. I couldn’t stick with it long enough to get the meat of the story. That’s a bad thing. If I had enjoyed it, I would have stuck with it, even with the threat of a shut down. If you love a game you stay until they shut off the lights and lock the door. Hence the reason I am still in TSW. I’m not sure there is anything NCSoft can do now to assure folks the game will stay around.

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Schmidt.Capela

I see two ways out for Wildstar:

– Changes big enough to convince many of the old players, and many new players, to give the game a chance. The issue here is that the game already used the “easy” version of this, the change to F2P, so going this way would require something more similar to FFXIV’s relaunch, which incurs heavy costs; I don’t think NCSoft would bankroll this, not for a game that already squandered its first such chance.

– Long term commitment while organically growing the player base. This is an option if the game is profitable (or at least breaking even), or if NCSoft is willing to put up with the loses until the game finds its legs. This would require a long time, plus an infusion of cash if the game is currently losing money, and I’m not sure NCSoft would wait that long (though this is better than my opinion back when the F2P conversion fizzled down; at that time I was certain NCSoft wouldn’t give the game the time it might need).

End result, I think this depends on whether Wildstar is currently breaking even. If it is, then I believe there is hope, even a good chance of it continuing for a good while in search of organic growth, if only to soften NCSoft’s image as a ruthless killer of underperforming games; if it’s not breaking even, then I don’t think there is much, if any, hope.

pepperzine
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pepperzine

I think it’ll chug along for a bit longer. I don’t think it can be saved at this point, unless they ported it to consoles. It’s a hard pitch though considering how it’s doing on PC.

I maintain the view that one of the critical problems for wildstar was the mismatch of aesthetics and target audience. I’ve given the game three different shots (beta, f2p launch, and endgame boost) and I just couldn’t get into it. I wanted to like it because I wanted a new game to raid in, but the aesthetic was too humorous for me to bare. In my experience, “hardcore” raiding gets taken very seriously by the people playing it which doesn’t really vibe well with comedy.

camren_rooke
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camren_rooke

As much as I would love to play a bunny girl, I won’t touch Wildstar. See any number of reasons in posts below.

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Kristen

This is why I won’t play Wildstar. I downloaded it when it went Free to Play, but it doesn’t have a large population so I don’t want to waste my time in a game that I think may be ending.

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dthblayde

Which creates the self perpetuating death spiral. “I wont play game cause there’s not enough people, thereby keeping the player count lower, ensuring others wont play it for the same reason.

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