A Dota 2 pro was beaten by Elon Musk’s OpenAI bot during this year’s International

Dota 2’s The International 7 tournament is over, having concluded this weekend by crowning EU group Team Liquid — which arrived to the finals by way of the loser’s bracket — champions. Liquid walks off with over $10M in earnings.

But perhaps the most interesting bit for folks who don’t follow Dota 2 closely came on Friday when the ubiquitous Elon Musk revealed his company’s Dota 2 bot, which he says learned a lifetime’s worth of game skills in just two weeks. To prove it, he pitted the bot against pro player Danylo “Dendi” Ishutin in a demo match… and the bot won easily twice.

Lest you think Musk has aims to take over the world, recall that his company OpenAI was founded to stop the AI from taking over the world, meaning this demo was ostensibly another high-profile attempt to provoke regulation.

Source: The Verge. Cheers, Sally!
SHARE THIS ARTICLE
Code of Conduct | Edit Your Profile | Commenting FAQ | Badge Reclamation | Badge Key

LEAVE A COMMENT

43 Comments on "A Dota 2 pro was beaten by Elon Musk’s OpenAI bot during this year’s International"

  Subscribe  
newest oldest most liked
Subscribe to:
Reader
Bryan Correll

I for one look forward to a post-human society.

Reader
shear

Do you think they’ll make it as toxic as the players too?

Reader
Herro Mongorian

There goes Elon fear mongering over AI again!

Reader
Sorenthaz

From what I heard during the stream it also beat Arteezy, Sumail, and some other big names that I forget about.

I don’t even think Dendi was at this year’s International as a competitor, and the last time he was even considered a top player was in The International 3 when Na’vi made second place vs Alliance. He just has a truckton of fame because he was one of the older pros, and was one of the world champions for The International 2 most famous for his Pudge plays, but his time as a top level player has steadily gone to the wayside as he hasn’t bothered moving to a different team like others have.

miol
Reader
miol

People feel so old so fast in these games, it’s baffling to me!

Even just watching last year’s EG captain ppd only as a commentator anymore in a suit in this year’s TI, made me feel so old myself! o.O

Reader
Sorenthaz

There’s just so much micro management and knowledge involved in a game like DotA 2. Fear was like 28 or so before he retired to become Evil Geniuses’ coach I think, but yeah a lot of it also just comes down to things steadily changing and pro players not being able to always do what they’re comfortable with. Same issue happens with LoL but probably even on a worse scale, just because in LoL the game drastically changes every few months whereas DotA 2 seems to not change things as drastically on such a frequent basis.

At least in DotA 2 it seems that pro players can stay more relevant on a regular basis as long as they’re able to keep up with the changes and whatnot. Feels like that game doesn’t have a hard falloff after ~22-24 like LoL seems to have.

Reader
Patreon Donor
Loyal Patron
Schlag Sweetleaf

DOTeA-BAGGED?

DOTeA BAGGINS.gif
Reader
Utakata

…which also reminds me: When bots start showing up at protests brandishing tiki torches, we should start worrying too. :(

Reader
Sally Bowls

Although, some non-competitive or casual players prefer the lower challenge of PvP instead of PvE.

Mewmew
Reader
Mewmew

“OpenAI was founded to stop the AI from taking over the world.” And to do so, they create powerful AI capable of taking over the world…

Reader
Kickstarter Donor
thalendor

I, for one, welcome our new MOBA-playing AI overlords…

…as long as they stay out of my MMOs. :-)

Reader
Minimalistway
Reader
Minimalistway

Sigh … i wrote so many comments about that last link and deleted them, the only good words i find is: WTH?!

Reader
Utakata

The question becomes did this bot have fun? If the answer is yes, maybe then we should start worrying! o.O

kjempff
Reader
kjempff

The problem is, at that time it is too late to worry or regulate. You can’t undo what is already there and much less reverse the motion. That is why people with foresight are trying to raise awareness now.

Reader
Utakata

…or paranoia. Just saying.

kjempff
Reader
kjempff

You are underestimating the rate of progress in AI technology.. just saying. It is very much time to start laying out some ground rules.. Just to get some kind of general consensus amongst 7bil people can take decades from now and “thinking robots” AI is not waiting several decades.

Reader
Utakata

I know a lot of folks like to throw that word around a lot, but I am not even sure AI is even viable or possible at this point. We still struggling with the term consciousness, let alone trying to define it in machine language.

But between you and me, I am currently more worried about humans in positions of authority with a few walls short of a house (and really bad hair) with their hands near the nuclear trigger switch. That will end this world quicker then I can type “artificial intelligence” if it all goes South. Just saying again.

Reader
Sally Bowls

The latest Tom Stoppard play is about consciousness https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Hard_Problem
and there are two camps: with better hardware/software, it can be successfully simulated and it is uniquely human.

There is a line I won’t do justice from memory along the lines of “It’s not impressive to come up with a program that wins; what would be impressive is to come up with one that minds losing.”
As a gamer, I only somewhat facetiously say that an AI that minded losing would spawn camp humans to extinction, probably shouting “git gud!”

Minimalistway
Reader
Minimalistway

So when (not if) bots replace large number of people, what will governments do? i’m hoping some are working on this problem before it happens, the idea of work should change, and no … not everyone can or want to be another programmer/designer.

Reader
Schmidt.Capela

A few of the more socialist ones (i.e., where the government is bound to redistribute wealth and support society and individual citizens) are, looking at ideas such as the basic universal income (the government pays everyone a wage that should be enough for a frugal lifestyle).

The ones where neoliberalism ideologies abound, though, seem to be ignoring the question. Which is quite understandable, because most potential solutions to this issue revolve around either strong regulation of automation or a state that provides for those that will lose their jobs, and neither of those options sit well with neoliberal supporters.

Reader
Malcolm Swoboda

“more socialist ones” – like Milton Friedman?