Mass Effect: Andromeda ends single-player support, forges on with multiplayer updates

It’s the end of the line for Mass Effect: Andromeda, as BioWare announced this past weekend that it had no further plans to develop single-player content for its sci-fi RPG. Fortunately, several projects to expand the game’s multiplayer aspect are still in the works.

“Our last update, 1.10, was the final update for Mass Effect: Andromeda. There are no planned future patches for single-player or in-game story content,” BioWare posted on the game’s site. “In the coming weeks, our multiplayer team will provide details of their ongoing support and upcoming content, including new multiplayer missions, character kits, and what’s in store for N7 Day.”

Andromeda failed to live up to the high studio and fan expectations, netting mixed reviews and a 72% Metacritic score following its March 2017 release. With work being done on other projects, such as Star Wars: The Old Republic and the upcoming multiplayer Anthem, BioWare may be looking to reallocate team members to needed departments.

Source: Andromeda via PC Gamer
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72 Comments on "Mass Effect: Andromeda ends single-player support, forges on with multiplayer updates"

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Cindy M

I am very disappointed in this. Almost heartbroken. Almost. IF it wasn’t for the fact that Casey Hudson (head of the original ME trilogy) is back into the fold in a big way and rumor has it that the Mass Effect franchise has been handed back to Edmonton. I am fervently hoping it would take more then one bad reviewed game to kill an entire franchise off and that there is still hope for more.

Yes! I love #MassEffect too much to not want to work on it again in the future. Thanks for the support – it means everything to our team. https://t.co/I5MlzSwQI8— Casey Hudson (@CaseyDHudson) August 20, 2017

^ the one ray of hope right there.

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flamethekid .

honestly this was foreseeable the development hell this game went through left it a shadow of its former vision

not only did the leftover squad that wasn’t on Anthem get put in charge on this
but
it was gonna be an entirely different game and the whole thing got scrapped and they had to quickly cobble this up

Valen Sinclair
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Valen Sinclair

RIP Mass Effect…my favorite games of all time. I suspect we will never see another ME game as well. I’m assuming the worst…that this franchise is officially dead, and it wasn’t due to lack of popularity or lack of demand. It was due to studio/dev incompetency.

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NeoWolf

Anthem is their new baby, Anthem is what killed Andromeda. My guess would be nothing more from Mass Effect for the foreseeable unless Anthem tanks ofc.

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Cindy M

The team working on Andromeda killed Andromeda. We all thought moving it to the Montreal studio would bring the ME1 magic back to ME. But instead they screwed the pooch for too long, pissed off Casey Hudson (I was mad at him for the ending of ME3 at the time so did not care) and ended scrapping their game and rushing to make it in what? 2 years? Ughhhh

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NeoWolf

Yeah it was a mess sadly :(
Half the team working on Andromeda were moved to Anthem mid development there was whole big run down of its tragic development not so long ago and Anthems development was essentially the cause.

It is just so disappointing that such a loved franchise be treated so carelessly and then abandoned rather than fixed. As fans it doesn’t exactly leave us feeling valued.

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Ket Viliano

The founders and core employees that made Bioware great are long gone. This is what happens when the original creators leave and scrubs take over.

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Dug From The Earth

The route this game went after release is 100% what should be expected when a company tries to cut corners with a product.

As much as fans were disappointed, this is GOOD that this is happening because these companies need to learn (the hard way apparently) that its NOT ok for them to do this if they want customers to 1. Buy their games and 2. think the games are good.

As much as this sucks for those of us that bought the game, its probably sucking even more for Bioware as a studio. Hopefully, this will be the “Ouch, the pan is hot” experience that will keep them from making the same mistake again.

Games need to go back to being the creation of those who love and desire to make a GOOD game, not a business decision by upper management whose only goal is to sell big, at the lowest production cost possible via hyped marketing and riding the coat tails of a popular IP.

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NeoWolf

So SO disappointed in them for this and I told them as much on twitter. A disgusting despicable way to treat a much loved franchise and its loyal fanbase. This franchise deserved better by a long way.

Theodrax
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Theodrax

This is probably the last “must buy” Bioware game I’ll ever see. It used to be automatic that if a Bioware game came out, I would play it.

I played through Andromeda, and it was “fine” but certainly nothing great. I figured I’d wait around for some polish and DLC and then maybe give it another go. Looks like there won’t be any coming so I’ll probably uninstall and leave it at that. If another Mass Effect or Bioware game comes out I’m certainly not purchasing it at release. I’ll wait for reviews and maybe some patches and DLC before even considering it.

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MeltWithYou

Ugggh well if Biowares being candid about ending SP support, I’ll be candid in so much as to say I haven’t played what I considered to be a ‘great’ Bioware game since Mass Effect 2.

Hypothetically – what if Blizz just released a few patches to fix the technical issues with D3 then scrapped further support on the game simply because ‘it didnt live up to expectations’? What kind of stain do you think that would have left on the company as a whole? Why doesnt Bioware ask themselves these kinds of questions?

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Vinicius Gonzalez

Stopped buying EA games after ME3 fiasco. They’re just doing what they always do. The stain is just getting bigger.

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Dug From The Earth

ME3 fiasco? I think thats a bit much.

The general consensus for ME3 was that 98% of it was a good game. It was just the last 20 minutes of the game (mainly the story) that was just complete and utter garbage.

I didnt regret my purchase of ME3 at all. I enjoyed all 40+ hours I put into the single player game (minus the last 20 minutes). The type of “fiasco” that MEA was is a completely different beast.

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Vinicius Gonzalez

Sorry, I expressed myself poorly.
Fiasco = bad ending.
As you, I enjoyed the game until the “I’m too lazy/don’t have time to create a proper ending”.
As for MEA I can’t talk, since I didn’t play it.
Edit: typo.

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Witches

So true, ME:A is the perfect sequel to ME3, and i actually have both games and enjoy them, two giant leaps in the wrong direction.

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Caley Kastigen

It really didn’t look likely anyways considering the reception of the game. I’m just sad not angry or disappointed since its EA and its to be expected, will just have to quietly wait for Cyberpunk 2077 unless another sci-fi rpg rears its head. Seriously whats up with sci-fi being so hard to find as recent releases.

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Alex Willis

This is a business decision, through and through, made in avoidance of the sunk cost fallacy: don’t throw good money after bad. Give them credit for taking risks, but a failed venture does not morally oblige them to continue supporting that branch of the IP. Imagine if we’d had no more Fallout games after the debacle that was Fallout: Brotherhood of Steel, because they felt obliged to keep dumping resources into that particular iteration? Better to cut the albatross loose.

Mass Effect is my favourite game IP. I hope this is not the end of the road for it. Still got my fingers crossed for an MMO set in that universe.

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kgptzac

without “moral obligation” leaves us with pure greed, which is hardly a good thing for consumer confidence. One critical advantage for games coming out from AAA devs is their ability to turn a bad game, good, if they have the willingness. Battlefield 4 did it, Final Fantasy 14 did it; both are important IP, and so is Mass Effect.

So yeah, big middle finger to them for the launching an unfinished product, and second middle finger for their cowardice for not making it good afterwards.

Xijit
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Xijit

Keep in mind that EA has hemorrhaging cash into Bioware since the day they bought them & every game they have released has struggled or flat out failed.

This isnt just Mass Effect Andromina flopping: it is DA 3 having luke warm sales numbers, plus ME3 being a total shit show that EA had to dump shit tons of cash into to float development costs on the DLC to unfuck it, which was preceded by SWTOR nearly lawn darting on launch & EA having to pull in directors from teams outside of Bioware to revamp the F2P transition, and that was preceded by DA2 being a shit show that no one liked.

EA has floated the fuck out of Bioware for a good long time & it is well overdue for them to step in on how theu run their development to say “no, you are not pullung this shit again: switch to a format that doesn’t involve shit tons of writing that requires fucktons of voice acting and facial animations.”

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John Mynard

I think the flat sales are related to the outspokenness of certain of their development staff. Customers don’t like being preached at and they WILL go elsewhere with their money if they feel unwelcome. They don’t have to spend their money with you.

I’m not saying they can’t have those opinions, or that they are even wrong necessarily, but while I am a wholly Conservative/Classically Liberal guy who writes long ass posts on my Facebook page, I DO NOT carry that over into business. Frankly, I don’t know what to do, but there needs to be policy, whether explicit or not, on how devs interact with their customers.

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Schmidt.Capela

The sunken cost fallacy is a bit more complex when corporate image and consumer trust are on the line; sometimes it’s a better long-term strategy to spend some more money shoring up a disappointing product than to cut it loose and go for the next iteration.

This is likely why Square spent so much money revamping FF XIV. It surely was damn expensive, but they can’t afford to have a main line Final Fantasy game be anything less than great.

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Cypher

Indeed. Mass effect is a global flagship brand, and if there’s ine thing i’ve learned from sitting in those long boring sales calls and pricing strategy meetings, it’s that market presence of your GFB’s is apparently more important than sales, for a time at least… but you always support them, even drive volume over revenue, it is afterall perception that drives share price.
Though i am talking about FMCGs, tobacco specifically.

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Alex Willis

A fair point, but the FF IP is a *lot* more developed in terms of audience depth and breadth, so the limits and payoff for those sunk costs will vary. For example, the curators of FF XIV would have known that this would definitely not be the last iteration of the IP, so it would have been important to maintain or build trust among that consumer base.