Mass Effect: Andromeda ends single-player support, forges on with multiplayer updates

It’s the end of the line for Mass Effect: Andromeda, as BioWare announced this past weekend that it had no further plans to develop single-player content for its sci-fi RPG. Fortunately, several projects to expand the game’s multiplayer aspect are still in the works.

“Our last update, 1.10, was the final update for Mass Effect: Andromeda. There are no planned future patches for single-player or in-game story content,” BioWare posted on the game’s site. “In the coming weeks, our multiplayer team will provide details of their ongoing support and upcoming content, including new multiplayer missions, character kits, and what’s in store for N7 Day.”

Andromeda failed to live up to the high studio and fan expectations, netting mixed reviews and a 72% Metacritic score following its March 2017 release. With work being done on other projects, such as Star Wars: The Old Republic and the upcoming multiplayer Anthem, BioWare may be looking to reallocate team members to needed departments.

Source: Andromeda via PC Gamer
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72 Comments on "Mass Effect: Andromeda ends single-player support, forges on with multiplayer updates"

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Cindy M

I am very disappointed in this. Almost heartbroken. Almost. IF it wasn’t for the fact that Casey Hudson (head of the original ME trilogy) is back into the fold in a big way and rumor has it that the Mass Effect franchise has been handed back to Edmonton. I am fervently hoping it would take more then one bad reviewed game to kill an entire franchise off and that there is still hope for more.

Yes! I love #MassEffect too much to not want to work on it again in the future. Thanks for the support – it means everything to our team. https://t.co/I5MlzSwQI8— Casey Hudson (@CaseyDHudson) August 20, 2017

^ the one ray of hope right there.

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flamethekid .

honestly this was foreseeable the development hell this game went through left it a shadow of its former vision

not only did the leftover squad that wasn’t on Anthem get put in charge on this
but
it was gonna be an entirely different game and the whole thing got scrapped and they had to quickly cobble this up

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Valen Sinclair

RIP Mass Effect…my favorite games of all time. I suspect we will never see another ME game as well. I’m assuming the worst…that this franchise is officially dead, and it wasn’t due to lack of popularity or lack of demand. It was due to studio/dev incompetency.

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NeoWolf

Anthem is their new baby, Anthem is what killed Andromeda. My guess would be nothing more from Mass Effect for the foreseeable unless Anthem tanks ofc.

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Cindy M

The team working on Andromeda killed Andromeda. We all thought moving it to the Montreal studio would bring the ME1 magic back to ME. But instead they screwed the pooch for too long, pissed off Casey Hudson (I was mad at him for the ending of ME3 at the time so did not care) and ended scrapping their game and rushing to make it in what? 2 years? Ughhhh

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NeoWolf

Yeah it was a mess sadly :(
Half the team working on Andromeda were moved to Anthem mid development there was whole big run down of its tragic development not so long ago and Anthems development was essentially the cause.

It is just so disappointing that such a loved franchise be treated so carelessly and then abandoned rather than fixed. As fans it doesn’t exactly leave us feeling valued.

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Ket Viliano

The founders and core employees that made Bioware great are long gone. This is what happens when the original creators leave and scrubs take over.

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Dug From The Earth

The route this game went after release is 100% what should be expected when a company tries to cut corners with a product.

As much as fans were disappointed, this is GOOD that this is happening because these companies need to learn (the hard way apparently) that its NOT ok for them to do this if they want customers to 1. Buy their games and 2. think the games are good.

As much as this sucks for those of us that bought the game, its probably sucking even more for Bioware as a studio. Hopefully, this will be the “Ouch, the pan is hot” experience that will keep them from making the same mistake again.

Games need to go back to being the creation of those who love and desire to make a GOOD game, not a business decision by upper management whose only goal is to sell big, at the lowest production cost possible via hyped marketing and riding the coat tails of a popular IP.

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NeoWolf

So SO disappointed in them for this and I told them as much on twitter. A disgusting despicable way to treat a much loved franchise and its loyal fanbase. This franchise deserved better by a long way.

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Theodrax

This is probably the last “must buy” Bioware game I’ll ever see. It used to be automatic that if a Bioware game came out, I would play it.

I played through Andromeda, and it was “fine” but certainly nothing great. I figured I’d wait around for some polish and DLC and then maybe give it another go. Looks like there won’t be any coming so I’ll probably uninstall and leave it at that. If another Mass Effect or Bioware game comes out I’m certainly not purchasing it at release. I’ll wait for reviews and maybe some patches and DLC before even considering it.

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MeltWithYou

Ugggh well if Biowares being candid about ending SP support, I’ll be candid in so much as to say I haven’t played what I considered to be a ‘great’ Bioware game since Mass Effect 2.

Hypothetically – what if Blizz just released a few patches to fix the technical issues with D3 then scrapped further support on the game simply because ‘it didnt live up to expectations’? What kind of stain do you think that would have left on the company as a whole? Why doesnt Bioware ask themselves these kinds of questions?

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Vinicius Gonzalez

Stopped buying EA games after ME3 fiasco. They’re just doing what they always do. The stain is just getting bigger.

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Dug From The Earth

ME3 fiasco? I think thats a bit much.

The general consensus for ME3 was that 98% of it was a good game. It was just the last 20 minutes of the game (mainly the story) that was just complete and utter garbage.

I didnt regret my purchase of ME3 at all. I enjoyed all 40+ hours I put into the single player game (minus the last 20 minutes). The type of “fiasco” that MEA was is a completely different beast.

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Vinicius Gonzalez

Sorry, I expressed myself poorly.
Fiasco = bad ending.
As you, I enjoyed the game until the “I’m too lazy/don’t have time to create a proper ending”.
As for MEA I can’t talk, since I didn’t play it.
Edit: typo.

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Witches

So true, ME:A is the perfect sequel to ME3, and i actually have both games and enjoy them, two giant leaps in the wrong direction.

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Caley Kastigen

It really didn’t look likely anyways considering the reception of the game. I’m just sad not angry or disappointed since its EA and its to be expected, will just have to quietly wait for Cyberpunk 2077 unless another sci-fi rpg rears its head. Seriously whats up with sci-fi being so hard to find as recent releases.

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Alex Willis

This is a business decision, through and through, made in avoidance of the sunk cost fallacy: don’t throw good money after bad. Give them credit for taking risks, but a failed venture does not morally oblige them to continue supporting that branch of the IP. Imagine if we’d had no more Fallout games after the debacle that was Fallout: Brotherhood of Steel, because they felt obliged to keep dumping resources into that particular iteration? Better to cut the albatross loose.

Mass Effect is my favourite game IP. I hope this is not the end of the road for it. Still got my fingers crossed for an MMO set in that universe.

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kgptzac

without “moral obligation” leaves us with pure greed, which is hardly a good thing for consumer confidence. One critical advantage for games coming out from AAA devs is their ability to turn a bad game, good, if they have the willingness. Battlefield 4 did it, Final Fantasy 14 did it; both are important IP, and so is Mass Effect.

So yeah, big middle finger to them for the launching an unfinished product, and second middle finger for their cowardice for not making it good afterwards.

Xijit
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Xijit

Keep in mind that EA has hemorrhaging cash into Bioware since the day they bought them & every game they have released has struggled or flat out failed.

This isnt just Mass Effect Andromina flopping: it is DA 3 having luke warm sales numbers, plus ME3 being a total shit show that EA had to dump shit tons of cash into to float development costs on the DLC to unfuck it, which was preceded by SWTOR nearly lawn darting on launch & EA having to pull in directors from teams outside of Bioware to revamp the F2P transition, and that was preceded by DA2 being a shit show that no one liked.

EA has floated the fuck out of Bioware for a good long time & it is well overdue for them to step in on how theu run their development to say “no, you are not pullung this shit again: switch to a format that doesn’t involve shit tons of writing that requires fucktons of voice acting and facial animations.”

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John Mynard

I think the flat sales are related to the outspokenness of certain of their development staff. Customers don’t like being preached at and they WILL go elsewhere with their money if they feel unwelcome. They don’t have to spend their money with you.

I’m not saying they can’t have those opinions, or that they are even wrong necessarily, but while I am a wholly Conservative/Classically Liberal guy who writes long ass posts on my Facebook page, I DO NOT carry that over into business. Frankly, I don’t know what to do, but there needs to be policy, whether explicit or not, on how devs interact with their customers.

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Schmidt.Capela

The sunken cost fallacy is a bit more complex when corporate image and consumer trust are on the line; sometimes it’s a better long-term strategy to spend some more money shoring up a disappointing product than to cut it loose and go for the next iteration.

This is likely why Square spent so much money revamping FF XIV. It surely was damn expensive, but they can’t afford to have a main line Final Fantasy game be anything less than great.

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Cypher

Indeed. Mass effect is a global flagship brand, and if there’s ine thing i’ve learned from sitting in those long boring sales calls and pricing strategy meetings, it’s that market presence of your GFB’s is apparently more important than sales, for a time at least… but you always support them, even drive volume over revenue, it is afterall perception that drives share price.
Though i am talking about FMCGs, tobacco specifically.

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Alex Willis

A fair point, but the FF IP is a *lot* more developed in terms of audience depth and breadth, so the limits and payoff for those sunk costs will vary. For example, the curators of FF XIV would have known that this would definitely not be the last iteration of the IP, so it would have been important to maintain or build trust among that consumer base.

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Arktouros

The Bioware multiplayer always follow the same model. It’s peer to peer hosted mini maps that are basically just content there to sell RNG Gamble boxes for upgrades/gear/characters/etc. That’s all it’s there for. It’s ankle deep. But it’s the same thing every single game. Was same in Mass Effect 3 as it was Dragon Age Inquisition and it’s same in Andromeda.

Personally I’m done with the Mass Effect series after 3. I wasn’t really upset with it’s ending per se but if you going to end a series with such finality then okay that’s it for me.

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Alex Willis

Yes, I look at the first 3 as self-contained. Will give it another go once they commit to another consistent series of high quality.

Xijit
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Xijit

I really hate the scapegoating people do for bioware … Their games have always been shitty side kick simulators where your “personal” character is always just riding shotgun to the one main character who drives the plot and your “decisions” never extend farther than giving that character advice on what to do next.

EA had nothing to do with the shit writing and go nowhere plots, that has been Bioware’s bread and butter since the first Baulder’s Gate … The only thing EA contributed to the shit show was a truck load of money for them to hire more people So they could pump out the same shit game format every 2 years instead of every 6.

…. But the reduced turnaround time gives people less time to forget how much of an underwhelming shit show the last game was and now people are going into their games without rose colored glasses on.

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Valen Sinclair

Oh look, it’s Mr. Edgy, trashing a dev and games that millions adore because he knows better. LMAO.

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Ket Viliano

So, don’t hold back, tell us how you really feel…
:P

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Sorenthaz

So in other words they’re not going to bother with paid DLC/expansions that actually take time/effort, and instead are just going to milk the lockboxes system that entices people to buy the RMT currency.

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Greaterdivinity

No, because the game doesn’t have a big enough install base, has lost enough players, and has a bad enough rep that expensive single player story DLC isn’t a wise financial decision on their part.

Why produce DLC for a game if you know it’s unlikely that you’ll turn a reasonable profit on the DLC?

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Dystopiq

Bioware right now.

am-i-out-of-touch-no-its-the-children-who-are-wrong.jpg
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Cypher

What i hate the most is when devs say “the game failed to live up to expectations”… like its a mystery and absoutely nothing to do with them or the publishers…

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Sorenthaz

Because they don’t like to admit that they fucked up or EA pushed the game out before it was ready (which EA does often). The thing with EA is that the moment something isn’t successful they massively cut down on support for it, and ME:A got a bad rep due to the bugs and so on at launch. So it’s much easier to just focus on the multiplayer content and encourage people to buy more of those lockboxes with the real money currency VS developing new story content with missions and characters and dialogue and so on in order to try and make ends meet and appease the EA overlords who aren’t happy.

But tbh Bioware is also just showing that it’s difficult for them to actually create an expansive multi-series universe/IP that doesn’t take from existing stuff. They wanted MEA to be similar but different to Shephard’s Mary Sue story, yet the end result was a lot of interesting ideas that failed to really do much.

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kidwithknife

I’m confused. Why is ending support for a single player game news? Is there something different about this game that I’m not picking up on?

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Dobablo

Because Bioware has traditionally produces purchasable content for several years after the release of games in its Mass Effect and Dragon Age franchises.
On the plus side, I purchased the game at 50% off and can not complete a playthrough without worrying about having to redo stuff when they release an expansion.

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hugmonster

Bioware were done with Mass Effect and wanted to move on. That was clear from the way ME3 ended.

But EA wanted another go at the franchise so they put the Montreal studio on it while Bioware “prime” could work on Anthem.

While the developers had great ideas and ambitions, I think it was a lack of experience and resources which caused the game to come out as it did. And while I admit it was flawed, I still enjoyed Andromeda and would have loved to see more of it, either as DLC or a proper sequel. I hope they handle it better next time they inevitably revive the franchise some years down the line.

Multiplayer on the other hand was great fun from start and I spent a good 100+ hours with it until they started flooding the loot table with variants and reskins of weapons and made it all the harder to unlock some of the rare weapons and characters (unless you’re buying lockboxes of course).

hurbster
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hurbster

Andromeda was the most disappointing game I have played for some time. Mainly because the writing is so poor.

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Sray

Disappointing, but not unexpected. I actually read this news over the weekend, and have been mourning a little bit ever since. Mass Effect: Andromeda is a game that I got really caught up in, and it drew me into the rest of the franchise for the first time, as regular readers of WRUP over the last few months can attest to.

I rarely play the “blame the players” game -and quite honestly this is on EA- but I know that a lot of the ridiculous early overreacting to some poor animations and somewhat lacking art direction probably hurt the game significantly more than was really justified: as someone who’s been marathoning the original trilogy over the last 2 months, I can safely say there was a ton of screwy animations and art design in the series long before Andromeda. So much focus was placed so loudly on what they had gotten wrong that the voices of those praising what it had done well -most notably combat, vehicles, and very responsive controls- were drowned out by a lot noise. And so damned much of that noise was just a nonsensical excuse attack various groups that had literally nothing to do with the game’s condition. It’s a shame, but EA really didn’t do anything to get out in front of that and change the story.

I’d also like to point out that some of MEA’s failure was just something in the zeitgeist. Prior to its release, every single big name game that had been released in 2017 to that point wasn’t just good, they were amazing. Nioh, Persona 5, Zelda: Breath of the Wild, Nier: Automata, and Horizon Zero Dawn (and I’m probably missing one or two) had all just knocked it out of the ballpark. Coming out in direct competition with a pack of games like that, many of which will likely be considered classics in the years to come, didn’t do a “7/10 at best” game any favors. Part of me feels like if the game had been delayed into June or July or even August, it would have fared much better against the games of this year’s mostly lackluster summer crop of big name games (I’m looking specifically at you, Agents of Mayhem).

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I rarely play the “blame the players” game

Then don’t. This is on Bioware Montreal doing a horrible job with the game, and it was more than just the art and animation.

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Sray

I didn’t. I said that the negative noise was EA’s fault for not getting out in front of it.

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Cypher

Horizon zero dawn is a masterpiece!

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Bannex

Terrible end to a really cool IP

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Ariel Domen

With work being done on other projects, such as Star Wars: The Old Republic…”
As someone that plays SWTOR and reads the “road aheads” I have to ask… What work???

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mysecretid

The new person in charge of SWTOR is making noises like he wants to do more with the game, but I agree with you. For a long time now, it’s felt like the game puts more effort into designing and promoting what’s in the next Cartel Pack or Cartel Market sale, than what’s happening with the actual game.

Beyond this, even if the new guy is utterly sincere about wanting to take the actual game to a better place, given the time it takes to make new MMORPG content, we probably won’t see any shift until sometime in the first half of 2018, at the earliest.

Cheers,

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Cypher

I believe its lockboxes and class changes… literally the only updates swtor does outside of an annual story expansion and the odd raid…

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Hirku

You know a game has failed when even EA can’t be bothered to crank out overpriced DLC for it.

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Paragon Lost

Is it time?

Stickman Papa EA comic.jpg
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mysecretid

it is indeed time. Again. Unfortunately.

Cheers, Paragon,

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zeko_rena

They have murdered so many of my favorite developers and games whats another body to pile…

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Greaterdivinity

With work being done on other projects, such as Star Wars: The Old Republic and the upcoming multiplayer Anthem, BioWare may be looking to reallocate team members to needed departments.

They already got absorbed into EA Motive for the most part. BW Montreal is dead for all intents and purposes : /

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Dug From The Earth

One might wonder if EA set them up to fail, so that they could have a forward facing excuse as to why to dissolve the studio.

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Greaterdivinity

…what? Why would a company sabotage a product they’ve invested roughly $100M into and carries one of their flagship IP’s?

They don’t need any excuses to dissolve BW Montreal, they own them and can do whatever they want with them at any time for any reason. And they were working on Andromeda long before Motive was formed (development started in at least 2012/13 while Motive wasn’t formed until 2015), so there wouldn’t have been been any studios for them to be absorbed by in the Montreal area.

That’s completely nonsensical.

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Dug From The Earth

why would a company sabotage a product they’ve invested roughly $100M into and carries one of their flagship IP’s?

And yet, they handed it off to a new studio, that had ZERO experience even making their own game, let alone a HUGE blockbuster IP like Mass Effect.

To me, thats just a completely stupid business decision in itself, and they still did it. Which is why I said, it makes me wonder if something else was going on behind the scenes.

Maybe some big wig in upper EA management wants the IP to die because despite bringing in money, it wasnt meeting projections?

Maybe there is a personal upper management grudge going on in the company. Maybe someone at Bio Montreal spat in the coffee of someone high up at EA? Who the hell knows. Stuff like this does go on (metaphorically), and often leads to strange and head scratching decisions down the road. IE: like giving a big IP to a team not suited to handle it, especially if you wanted the IP to continue to do well.

Maybe the cost of keeping the Montreal studio around was more of a negative than stabbing your own successful IP in the back? I couldnt say, I dont have those types of numbers available to me. But you know who does have those? Someone in EA management. Maybe to appease their investors, they wanted the closure of Montreal to seem legit, as opposed to just outright shutting it down? We can speculate either side of this, but none of us can really know.

Clearly, EA didnt care about their “flagship IP” as much as you (and the rest of us) think they should have cared, otherwise different management decisions would have been made over the whole course of the project.

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Greaterdivinity

A support studio, they gave them a chance to show they could be more than just a support studio. That’s a laudible goal for a publisher, as often times support studios languish as nothing more than support studios, leaving the incredible talent that they have unfulfilled because their publishers never given them a chance to show what they can really do.

It’s not as if they were new, they had plenty of experience working on other BW titles over the years, plus access to all the resources of the greater EA/BW family that they were a part of.

All that was going on behind the scenes was that there was nobody else to work on a Mass Effect title given BW’s lineup at the time, and EA gave a new team a shot. It didn’t pan out because BW Montreal fucked it up.

Some bigwig wanting the IP to die? No, that’s stupid. Beyond stupid. EA executives don’t want to kill brands that make them money, they don’t have “personal grudges” like that. That’s dumb.

If EA overmanages and harms their developers, they get shit on for being too involved and not giving developers creative freedom. If they stay out of it and let their developers fail on their own because they didn’t overmanage, they get shit on because they didn’t control the developer well enough. I get there’s a happy middle ground somewhere in there, and I get that EA rightfully deserves a lot of shit for the stupid shit they’ve done over the years, but this is purely BW Montreal screwing the pooch when they were given the kind of opportunity that support studios dream of – the full support and backing of their publisher to work on a major IP and show off what they are capable of doing.

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Dug From The Earth

Again, you dont hand over one of your Flagship IPs to a support studio with zero experience, if you arent ok with the fact that they may fail to do a good job.

Which either means

1. EA is run by idiots
or
2. EA was ok with chance of the IP bombing due to the support studio failing to put out a good game.

Either of these situations is pretty screwed up.

No, that’s stupid. Beyond stupid.

Because upper management never makes stupid decisions…

Im not at all denying that setting up a studio to fail is a stupid decision. Im simply saying… stupid decision CAN and DO happen.

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Greaterdivinity

They have plenty of experience, they worked on multiple BW titles over the years. Every game is a risk for any studio taking it on, we’ve seen flops from experienced, well respected studios as well as those making their first solo games.

You’re still trying to ultimately place blame on EA for what was BW Montreals fuckup. They fucked up. EA gave them all the rope they needed to make a beautiful knot and they ended up making a noose to hang themselves. There’s no indication that I’ve seen that EA is responsible for interfering and screwing anything up for them, as they’ve done with other brands over the years (sup Dead Space!). If there was, I’d be happy to throw some shade at them.

But they literally did what folks want publishers to do – take their talented teams, including those that haven’t had a chance to make a solo game yet but have worked on countless other titles, and give them plenty of budget and space to make their creative vision a reality. And it’s still their fault that the game sucked, somehow.

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Dug From The Earth

They have plenty of experience

That is entirely subjective. Based on what? Your gut feeling? Sure, they had their hands in the code of several game DLCs and some other game bits. But they had ZERO experience working 100% on a full, big, flagship IP game.

MEA was their first, full game.

The results of that game, speak for themself. Were other factors an element in the game failing too? Very very possibly. But to just rule out this development studios lack of necessary experience in making and handling a big IP, like Mass Effect, wouldnt be a very sensible mindset to follow.

You dont give something valuable, that you really care about, to someone who hasnt proven to you that they can reliably take care of it.

Unless you are ok with the chance of it failing.

EA apparently was ok with the chance of MEA failing.

Otherwise, a LOT of decisions would have been made differently.

— Montreal may have dropped the ball, but EA was the one that gave them the opportunity to do so. Which in a lot of viewpoints, can be seen as “setting them up to fail”. Giving them a nearly impossible goal to meet. Hey Montreal, try to live up to the standards and success of this HUGE game series!! Oh yeah, you only have this much time to work on it, with only these resources! Good luck!”

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Greaterdivinity

Based on the multiple games they’ve worked on as a team in their capacity as a support studio (including ME3 and DAO, IIRC), plus their respective pre-Montreal histories. This isn’t some fresh faced group of kids working on their first game, these are industry vets, many of whom had been at Montreal or within BW for years.

Yes, ME:A was their first full game as a studio. But they had to start somewhere, what other BW property would you have had them work on? Dragon Age? A Jade Empire revival that would have been even riskier? Another KOTOR that would have had even higher expectations given the Star Wars IP?

Again, the studio didn’t lack experience. It was headed by people with multiple major launches under their belt and staffed by folks with plenty of experience. Again, this wasn’t some fresh team of inexperienced newbies working on their first game. It was the first solo game as a studio, but these are all industry vets working there.

And again, every game is a risk and there’s a chance it will fail, even games from experienced and well respected developers.

Yes, EA gave them the opportunity – but it was Montreal that fucked it up. It’s like wanting to be a race car driver all your life and you’re finally given the opportunity and you wreck the car. It’s your fault for wrecking the car, not the fault of the car owner for giving you the opportunity.

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Dug From The Earth

And yet, the results of their first, big game IP, say differently.

Whats the phrase?

“The results speak for themselves”

And your car analogy…

A car racer doesnt just go from “I drive my kids to school every day” (ie: experience driving) to immediately sitting in the seat of a car in the indy 500. Most people, even those with some experience under their belt, are likely to crash an burn. You have to work your way up to something as big as the indy 500.

So yes, you wrecked the car, you were driving it, its your fault. But you shoudnt have been there in the first place.

What you are describing, is the whole understanding of what “Setting someone up to fail” is.

Ive had a couple years of martial arts training. Id love to compete professionally, but if Chuck Norris got me a pass to compete in the grand world MA tourney, he wouldnt actually be doing me a favor. Im no where near prepared to handle something of that caliber (i probably wont be for many years – or ever for that matter).

The primary thing I hold Montreal responsible for, is not telling EA “Nope, sorry, that project is way too big for us to handle on our own”

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Greaterdivinity

Yes, BW Montreal fucked up big time when given the opportunity to shine.

So why are you still trying to blame EA for failures that fall squarely on BW Montreals shoulders, again?

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Dug From The Earth

Maybe because EA should know the limits of what their dev studios are capable of?

If they honestly thought Montreals success chance would have been greater than it was, then that is STILL a flaw in the system that led to things getting fubar.

If you want to insure that the president is safe, You use the secret service. You dont hire the rent-a-cops from the local mall. Unless you want something bad to happen, and someone to blame when it does.

I still stick to the belief that EA was simply OK if there was a chance MEA would bomb. They werent spending the number of resources on it that they had done in the past, and the IP probably wasnt as big of a earner (percentage wise) as it had been in the past. I think EA is more focused on newer, fresher IPs. And if they could make some side cash on older ones, great. If not… not much spent, not much lost.

And oh look, now they dont have the costs of running an entire studio (well, not as much… some resources were reallocated)

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mysecretid

This makes me both sad and angry.

If any other major game publisher besides EA inherited control of the Mass Effect franchise, they’d A) be happy to have it, and B) they’d keep iterating on the games, knowing that the games would always turn some form of profit (eventually) if handled with basic care, even if they weren’t all “Game Of the Year” releases.

Bah.

I can’t write about this any more right now. What a colossal waste.

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Schmidt.Capela

You can say the same about dozens of IP that were acquired by EA together with their developers, and then basically killed. EA has been doing this for over two decades.

It’s why I find it hard to like EA. It has repeatedly snatched the studios that made my favorite franchises, only to kill those same franchises.

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Greaterdivinity

Well, who would make the game? BioWare’s A teams (since Montreal was given a shot to step up to the plate and failed, and is now absorbed into Motive) are working on Dragon Age and Anthem, plus work on SWTOR and some other projects as well. There’s no bandwidth for another ME game in the near future right now unless they farm it out to another studio or cancel other projects they’re working on now.

It’s a damn shame, but this is on BW Montreal for screwing up. And you’re right, many other publishers would likely be all too happy to churn out more sequels if they had the IP, but honestly they’d probably be pretty awful. And after the ME3 ending debacle and now ME:A nonsense, the IP definitely need some time in the dark to get away from all that negativity attached to it. It sucks for consumers who love the IP, but it’s just in a pretty shit place right now from a business perspective.

EA can afford to let ME sit on the shelf for a while because they’ve got a number of strong IP’s that they can continue to rely on (Battlefront, Battlefield, Fifa, Madden, Need for Speed etc.) while also having a pretty robust upcoming lineup (Battlefront 2, at least 2 other Star Wars games, Anthem, more installments of the annual/bi-annual franchises like Madden/Battlefield, new Dragon Age in early development etc.). They can realistically only pack so many games into their yearly launch calendars, and they’ve already seen very clearly the danger of trying to stack launches like they did with Battlefield 1/Titanfall 2, which led to Titanfall 2 getting shit on. Not because it was bad (quite the contrary!), but because it was sandwiched in between the juggernauts that are Battlefield and Call of Duty.

If you want to get mad at anyone, get mad at BW Montreal for screwing it up. The details regarding the troubled development process for ME:A make it very clear that Montreal seriously mismanaged the development of the game all on their own : /

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Mikey's Bored

I’m pretty upset about this, because I honestly believe that this game was actually really good, despite it’s flaws. As a long time fan of the series I thoroughly enjoyed it and think there was a mountain made out of a mole hill. The game sold phenomenally well, so I only hope at this point that they don’t axe the series altogether. Edmonton made the original 3, perhaps they will make the next installment again. SWTOR is developed in Austin so I don’t really see why that would effect what they do in Edmonton. BioWare recently re-hired some of their original lead developers from the original Mass Effect, and Dragon Age Origins days, and they’re also working on Dragon Age 4, and have a roadmap to Dragon Age 5 in place already, so the studio has a lot on their plate.

Purewitz
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Purewitz

Sad thing is EA has shut down Edmonton and won’t be making any new Mass Effect games any time soon or ever. All they have said is, not in the foreseeable future. So they must’ve lost a lot of money on Andromeda . I haven’t played it yet, but I have been a Mass Effect fan since 2007 with the release of the first game. Andromeda is the first Mass Effect game I haven’t bought day one. I want to play it, but with all the bad press. I may wait until it’s 20 bucks or less.

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Mikey's Bored

They shut down Montreal, not Edmonton, Montreal was a new office they opened as a support studio, and they handed Andromeda to them to develop, while Edmonton is their Headquarters/main branch. They also didn’t lose any money on it, quite the contrary, their earnings call showed that they made significant profit on it. https://www.forbes.com/sites/insertcoin/2017/07/29/ea-is-now-singing-mass-effect-andromedas-praises-as-a-revenue-driver-but-no-word-on-dlc/#10602f074b22

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Dobablo

When it comes software and a cycle where so much of the costs are sunk and the cost of sales in negligible, net profit useless when it comes to making decisions about on-going support. The money is spent. All that can be influenced is how long and how hard to milk the revenues.

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Greaterdivinity

Not really. They made a good chunk of revenue compared to the same quarter last year…which have Plants vs. Zombies 2 launch and…that’s pretty much it. Of course ME:A was going to be drive higher revenue than that.

But notice the lack of sales announcements? The fact that literally the first we heard regarding the games sales “success” was a throwaway generic line on a earnings call. They needed to say something so investors wouldn’t panic, so they took the most useless metric they could find that would make it look good – revenue compared to the same quarter last year when they launched fuckall.

If the game legitimately sold well, they’d have come out with the usual, “Sold X copies!” “Generated Y revenue!” “Outpacing sales of prior games by X!” etc. that publishers can’t get out fast enough to try to maintain sales momentum if the game is doing well. But they didn’t, because while the game may have overall made a profit (pretty safe bet that they at least fully covered development/marketing costs), it didn’t do much better than that.

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Sally Bowls

I rarely read “Sold X copies!” “Generated Y revenue!” from many devs be they EA or ATVI or whatever. Did EA do any “Sold X copies!” “Generated Y revenue!” for any of their other games this quarter? What incentive does a company have to release much more than the required by SEC?

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Greaterdivinity

Bah, responded with links but that triggered the comment to be moderated, adjusting it below –

Generally, it’s a momentum release. It shows how well a game is selling/how popular it is and it grabs them tons of great, positive headlines that are both positive for their overall brand image (look, more successes!) or help drive additional sales by convincing others of how popular the games are, so they must be good!

They’re a bit less common now than they used to be given how the landscape has changed over the years and the fact that blockbuster titles aren’t selling as well right out the gate as they have been and that a lot more money is being made post-launch (see games like Rainbow Six Siege, which started slow but have become great revenue generators for Ubisoft) or games that . Here’s a few from recent years though – (links would be here!)

Destiny 1 initial sales
Division initial sales
NieR Automata selling over 1M copies
Capcom selling over 450K copies of SF2 on Switch
Squeenix selling 6 million sales of FFXV

Companies love that shit. Any time they can toot their own horns about how great their games are doing, they will.

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Greaterdivinity

Generally, it’s a momentum release. It shows how well a game is selling/how popular it is and it grabs them tons of great, positive headlines that are both positive for their overall brand image (look, more successes!) or help drive additional sales by convincing others of how popular the games are, so they must be good!

They’re a bit less common now than they used to be given how the landscape has changed over the years and the fact that blockbuster titles aren’t selling as well right out the gate as they have been and that a lot more money is being made post-launch (see games like Rainbow Six Siege, which started slow but have become great revenue generators for Ubisoft) or games that . Here’s a few from recent years though –

https://gamerant.com/destiny-sales-day-one-record/
https://www.gamespot.com/articles/the-division-breaks-more-sales-records-passes-dest/1100-6435683/

Get ready for more Nintendo Switch titles from Capcom

Final Fantasy XV Surpasses 6 Million In Global Shipment And Digital Sales

Companies love that shit. Any time they can toot their own horns about how great their games are doing, they will.

(Edited by mod to remove GamingBolt link – it’s throwing up a login popup)

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