The Daily Grind: What sort of content discourages you from projects in MMOs?

Pretty soon, we’re getting the next tier of anima/zodiac/whatever weapons in Final Fantasy XIV. Every time those show up I find myself thinking that this time, this time I’m going to knuckle down and get this done. And each time a FATE grind kicks things off, and then I’m out. No thank you, see you again next expansion. That instantly and viciously kills my interest in the quest line each time around, and honestly I don’t know why; it’s not that I won’t do FATEs for other purposes, after all.

I’m not unique in this, but it’s also nice to know that I’m not the only one who has similar barriers. I know there are people who clocked out of crafting quests in World of Warcraft: Legion because those quests require dungeon running, and these are people who generally are happy to run dungeons and craft. Putting the two together just felt like orange juice and toothpaste, it seems.

So what about you, readers? What sort of content discourages you from projects in MMOs? Is it always the same sort, or does it depend entirely on the game in question? And is that content stuff you enjoy normally or something you don’t want to do anyhow?

Every morning, the Massively Overpowered writers team up with mascot Mo to ask MMORPG players pointed questions about the massively multiplayer online roleplaying genre. Grab a mug of your preferred beverage and take a stab at answering the question posed in today’s Daily Grind!
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70 Comments on "The Daily Grind: What sort of content discourages you from projects in MMOs?"

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Chris Brown-DeMoreno

Anything that requires me to perform some mundane or repetitive task. FATEs are among the worst aspects of FFXIV. You jump in, spam whatever AoE abilities you have and just try not to get hit by AoE in return. It usually doesn’t matter because there’s so many people there that whatever you’re fighting dies damned near instantly. It’s incredibly boring. Why would you force players to do that?

flyingltj
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flyingltj

Forced grouping.
Forced PVP.
Time limits.
“Global” events.
Gender locking.
Race locking.
Class locking.
Lock boxes.
Cash shops.
Instancing.
Class-based progression.

… essentially most everything that has become the norm in MMO’s in the past decade.

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Schmidt.Capela

First and foremost, time limits. Nowadays I tend to just stop logging whenever the MMO runs any time-limited event, particularly those of the one-shot variety, and I don’t always return to the game after the event is over. I play games so I can repeat any content I liked at will, so any game where repeating what I previously liked is impossible holds absolutely no interest for me.

Second, raiding. I won’t ever raid, not even on a faceroll difficulty like WoW’s LFR; I will never do anything that would require me to raid, I will often give up on anything that has multiple ways of accomplishing but would be much faster if I raided, and I will immediately leave any MMO if I reach a point where progression is either impossible or greatly slowed down for anyone that doesn’t raid.

Third, RNG. In particular any grind that involves items that can only be obtained as rare drops; I always assume that in any RNG content I will get the absolute worst result possible. I’m occasionally willing to do long grinds for things where the results are reliably predictable, including ostensibly RNG grinds that nevertheless have good and reliable bad streak prevention, but I will never farm for a rare drop that depends only on RNG.

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rafael12104

I don’t mind grinding and I don’t mind tedium as long as there is a larger purpose in mind. It is what it is. And “projects” usually involve a little of both, to some degree.

No, what grinds my grinds my soul is rng. Going through all the bs only to have it taken away by rng? F@$! that!

Good old ArchAge did that to me long ago. After grinding skills and mats and levels to make the badass armor I wanted, after crafting several stages of armor as required, and risking life and limb trading with the opposing faction, RNG made it all meaningless! The game actually lets you craft it too, but when you are finished, there is an RNG roll that determines whether you get the badass armor or some lesser garbage.

And don’t get me started on upgrading said armor after that. Another RNG check that could destroy the fucking armor!

Never again. I mean never. You want me to opt out? Throw RNG into the crafting mix as I describe above. You want me to quit playing a game, do that crap to me.

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Leiloni

The long list of boring, way too long, and way too numerous story quests in FFXIV to get to the fun stuff. Somehow most other games manage to deliver story without wasting your time and keeping it fun, but FFXIV is just so completely bad at that and the story isn’t even good. There’s a lot to like about the game, but the massive story wall is so hard to overcome. Trying to get into Stormblood is when it finally won.

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Malcolm Swoboda

I know I was particularly turned off by Nightmare Rift and Notoriety requirement to continue questing in RIFT. I don’t think it was really terrible, but it felt badly placed and designed.

veldara
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veldara

My limited time these days has been a blessing in disguise because it’s allowed me to really put into perspective what I enjoy and look for in games, which is doubly true for the MMO genre. Looking back at it now, the pressure to just be competitive in the game in itself was a factor that inhibited my enjoyment of a game. Trying to stay current, keeping on top of the grind, it felt like a job at that point.

Now that I’m far busier and with limited time to game, this gave me the opportunity to distill what I really just look for in games: to casually hang out and joke around in discord, maybe drink a nice ale, listen to some music while mindlessly doing public events and easy content. I don’t see myself raiding or doing anything remotely difficult anymore in games and I’m ok with that.

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Jack Kerras

Content locked behind interminable story quests.

I love you, FFXIV. Your mechanics are immaculate. I want to play you, but you don’t want me to. :/

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Bannex

Level cap increases every xpac, ilvl increases every patch, the general lack of overall staying power of current content.

I play WoW because it’s generally and sadly the best mmo on the market but the issues I’ve started above are fundamental to the game. I don’t commit to any long term projects in the game because of this.

When an mmo comes out that beats wow in overall playability, I’d happily leave if it can solve the longevity issue without restarting a grind and making older content obsolete with every update…

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Utakata

It’s one of those “Where do I start?” questions. :(

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Wendigo Runner

There are two major barriers for me: Forced grouping and repetitive grinds. Either will cause me to walk away and it’s actually why I didn’t sign into XIV for a month in spite of how much I thoroughly enjoy the game’s atmosphere and over all experience.

Gating in general is a big honking red flag unless you’re talking about some epic content. Being an old school EQ player I am actually in favor of certain kinds of gating for raid-level content, but MMO designers seem to go out of their way to figure out how to gate-off every day casual content. I don’t know if it’s to force people to be in-game longer, or a misguided attempt to make something “meaningful” (spoiler: It’s already meaningful and it’s casual content for a reason), or a mixture of both.

For example, cosmetics are frequently behind repetitive grinds. It voraciously sucks the life out of what should be a FUN experience. It’s a game, you’re supposed to be able to log in, laugh, fool around with friends and just have fun in general. Instead, they force you to engage in the same task for weeks on end before you can do so and that defeats the entire purpose.

I guess what I’m saying is that spontaneity is a foundational requirement for good, casual fun. The moment that you toss barriers in front of that fun is when you get people dropping the activity like a lead weight.

You have a particular activity, or interest, or cosmetic item in mind. You want to have fun. Suddenly you have a week, two weeks, sometimes more of grinding before you can do the thing that you’re happy thinking about doing now. Voila, you don’t do it and it doesn’t matter that the activity itself is something that you would otherwise do because it’s ruined the intended experience by preventing what SHOULD have been a log-in-and-have-fun moment.

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squidgod2000

Anything time-gated, like a faction grind where you can only get faction from quests and can only do one quest a day.

Or anything involving similarly special currencies that only come from repeating the same content (like a dungeon) over and over and over and over and over and over and over and over and over and over and over and over and over and ov….

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Paul

The biggest one is probably forced (or to use the euphemism devs seem to like, “encouraged”) PvP to progress in PvE.

All too often games I’ve played seem to lock their best PvE content behind a PvP wall. The only possible explanation that I can believe is that its a strategy designed to cater to griefers and give them distracted targets to prey on. Stupid design and I rarely play games that do this long term.

I do PvP in some games (Eve is the one I’ve done most in), but if I do its my choice and not because I have to do it to progress.

I can live with a few high end resources only being available in PvP zones – that helps stimulate the economy and gives PvPers an income.

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Fervor Bliss

Open world, PvP I have better things to do than waste my time on this junk.

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Rolan Storm

Boring. Anything boring.

Polyanna
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Polyanna

I could list a dozen things that have made me check out of long-term goals in different games, but none of them were because I dislike any particular type of content. I have played solo, small group, large group, and PvP content in lots of games, and at different times, in different ways, I like all of them, for the time I spent doing them, when they were fun.

It’s easier to describe what it takes to get me to keep working toward any long-term goal in any progression system: (1) let me get “credit” toward progress on that goal, however slight, from anything and everything that I do while playing your game, all the time; and (2) never negate any of my progress, or make me have to re-progress any part of it.

The Champion system in ESO is a good example of a long-term progression system that works well this way. You can get points for doing anything you want to do after level 50; questing, world bosses, dungeons, mob grinding, endgame group instances, whatever. It all moves the bar, some things a bit more than others. It also never throws away or makes you re-grind progress, because the points, once earned, are account-wide, and can be re-used to benefit all of your characters.

Gearing in ESO also works reasonably well this way. New content will introduce new gear that I may want to get, but my old gear is just as good today as it was a year ago, for the specific things that it’s good for. The only time I have to get new gear is when I want to do new things, or old things in a new way. And all gear is bind-to-account, so even if I no longer love it for one character, I probably can find some use for it on another.

You wanna get me to quit your game in a skinny minute, just tell me I only get credit for playing your way, every day, and when I get “done” playing your way for weeks or months on end, then I have to turn right around and do it all over again, your way, every day, for weeks or months more, just to get the same old things I already got, and none of it will matter in a year because it will all be obsolete and I’ll have to start over doing the same bullshit again when you decide to dump the next big thing and negate everything that everyone has done before.

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Carebear

Personally I am discouraged by dailies… I can’t do a boring content every day for a period of time in order to get what I want. Thats why I am not bothered anymore with MMOs “endgame” cause it usually revolves around time gated boring content.

That was the reason I dropped wow in MoP… not that wow didnt had dailies before, but they weren’t so important before. Thats why I dont like Legion World Quest and class campaigns. Generally I dont like daily tasks, that you either do them or you lose the opportunity. No matter how much time you want to devote into your goal, you will get it in x time…

I also have not done anima/relic weapon in FFXIV but didnt drop the game for it, cause I could always find a similar weapon and much more easy. FFXIV anima weapon is all about the skin and prestige.

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athiev

In FFXIV particularly, any weapon phase that asks me to spend millions of gil is annoying. I’ll spend gil melding crafting clothes, but not on a cosmetic weapon.

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Robert Mann

Any of the following: Too easy. Too dull and repetitive. Absolutely no rules PvP. PvP with my PvE goals. Low interest rewards or a lack of fun in doing the task.

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Bob Bobson

The answer to the question in that article is actually pretty easy and also the reason why I currently don’t play any MMO at all.

Most or maybe all MMOs add content that nullifies things you earned before way too quick. The last game where things you achieved had some lasting value was The Secret World and thats gone. Playing World of Warcraft at the moment means you either are investing all your energy into pet collecting if you want anything of lasting value, or you hurry like a hamster to stay on top of the game.

I know most people are content with their achievements being devalued after a short to midlong time. I on the other hand would rather have at least a bit of lasting value to my efforts in an MMO. I want to “live” in an MMO world and slowly expand my power, or collectibles so that after some years I can look back and say “that was a great ride and this is what I have to show for it” instead I can trash 90% of everything after a few months of play because there is stuff that is better in all respects and the last 10% that actually keeps some value is too few to keep me content.

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Robert Mann

That’s the nature of a system with stat values on items. It’s that simple. You will either play games with other item systems, or you will do this.

If you want it to apply more broadly, you must also avoid level based games, because level-up comes with the need for other rewards in these games.

In other words, you need an MMO that you actually like the design of (whether it be no-PvP or whatever) with more of a world based system rather than a combat RPG based system. Which is something I’ve been asking for… for a long time.

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Carebear

thats not always true… The tailoring crafting set in TBC wow plus the Feet/Head crafts last me almost the whole expansion.. and I did raid in T4 and half T5 raids.. the items you got in Vanilla and TBC it wasn’t 3-monthers

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Leviathonlx

That was more an issue of those items being way too damn good.

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Carebear

Not only this items..there were many items that hold for very long… remember badge of tenacity for tank druids? A blue trinket that last them up until T6. The red belt of battle (crafting plate belt) was the best belt in tbc and also… the best belt to start raiding in wotlk as a dps plate!

There are probably more i am not remember now but for sure items lasted for much longer than current MMOs..

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Ket Viliano

Yea, its the level based game, with level compatible item stats, that does not mix well with a large interactive player base. In PvP it is a joke, as the higher level wins, and in PvE it prevents the players from playing with their friends of a different level. Levels, as a game mechanism, do not scale well across large numbers of players.

It should be possible to have items with stats that grant a bonus to one thing, but not to another, thereby forcing a trade off choice to be made by the player. As long as the stats are not simply a +1 longsword vs. a +5 longsword, it could work.

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Mr Poolaty

The kids today and the older people of yesterday.

If you want to play an rpg with a friend then find one. Today’s mmos are so watered down. Every one is a rush to level cap with multiple ways to gain more and more xp. Hell there’s even games with max level insta potions. I mean wtf? Why even play the game if something you don’t wanna do?

If for instance you complain about the grind or you just don’t have the time to spend on it like you used to even you was younger then don’t play or find a moba!

Then the kids of today need to have a carrot in a string that they eat while following the carrot and the carrot has to replenish at the same time…

Don’t water down the content for some because their crybabies and want everything instantly.

MMOs are grindy and should be. If not you loose the will to proceed on because well you’ve ran through the game so fast because if not the passies woulda flew out crying…

And I don’t have a problem with a little compromise. But geezus you don’t need nor deserve everything in the game because you signed up!

I want to grind. If I didn’t I could play skyrim for a month and be done..

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Sally Bowls

Except they’re not watering down the content because of the crying of the crybabies, it is the number of crybabies. I suspect crybabies complain less than bittervets; crybabies just move on.

Game companies are trying to sell a product to customers. If 100M people wanted to play something like EQ1 and 0.2 wanted to play something like WoW, then the MMO landscape would look like EQ1. Not due to fairness; not due to complaints; due to that being what the customers want.

If your complaint is fundamentally “why can’t the rest of the internet be as wise, intelligent and good-looking as I?” then I empathise; I feel your pain every day. :-)

borghive
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borghive

I hate playing MMOs as a whole that cater to people who hate to group or try to force a more story driven single player experience. For example, Lord of the Rings online has tons of these little story instances that can only be completed solo. FF14 is naother offender, it has huge segments of isolating, single player story instances. I play MMOs for team play and to meet new people, being forced into these isolated single player stories just bores me to death. I’d rather play a game like The Witcher 3 if I wanted a solo RPG experience.

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Hirku

Any sort of grind and forced PVP/raiding. I don’t like that type of gameplay, I will never like that type of gameplay, stop trying to shove it down my throat.

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Witches

Anything that requires grouping, i remember fondlY(not ing) the first time i played GW2 and realized that i didn’t need to be group with that guy hacking at that mob to contribute to the fight, of course i joined him fighting the mob why wouldn’t i, but as soon as you tell me i HAVE to play with him i get this urge to go play something else.

High difficulty content that scales up, i’ve already cleared it, what’s the point of making it hard to complete by myself, or with a smaller group, just to kill time? The least you could do if you scaled the difficulty up is to improve the rewards.

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Mr Poolaty

Then why play an mmo?

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Utakata

Why not? MMO’s by nature are group optional, and not group mandatory.

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FreecczLaw

By nature? Please elaborate.

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Utakata

It’s a metaverse where players have a choice of grouping or not. It’s a fairly easy concept to understand outside the pro-group groupies. Just saying.

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FreecczLaw

I mean a lot of mmorpgs, especially some older, but some upcoming as well pretty much forces you to group as long as you want to do anything except maybe crafting. That is why I don’t really understand what you mean when you say by nature. Technically it is a choice, but in reality it isn’t. So wouldn’t it depend on the nature of the specific MMORPG and not the genre as a whole?

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Utakata

Because this is purely a decision of developers to introduce forced grouping in earlier MMO’s, does not negate the fact that the nature of MMO’s are group optional. As it could of easily been to have made those earlier games all entirely solo’able.

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FreecczLaw

I think I understand what you mean. Thanks for explaining.

I will say that generally I don’t think it really answers the initial question you answered however even if it is a valid answer. For the most part MMORPGs aren’t as good compared to single/small scale multiplayer games in terms of gameplay/graphics etc.

So if you don’t want to play with other people what is the draw? Is it that you can interact with people in different ways (like chat, or play the ah) even if you don’t like to play with them? Is it the regular updates/grinds? Is it something else? I mean noone has to justify why they play something they enjoy, but it is still interesting to hear.

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Hirku

I play MMOs because I enjoy playing in a huge world full of other people instead of just NPCs. I enjoy the spontaneous moments of cooperation, conflict, and role-playing, or having the freedom to ignore everybody and do my own thing. I’d say that’s more true to the spirit of the genre than constantly being walled off in a dungeon instance with 3 DPSs, a tank, and a healer.

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David McD

Some people prefer to play where there is a living breathing world without having to interact with them. It’s the difference between going to a concert or a club all by yourself versus having a crowd around. You feed off the crowd but you don’t necessarily interact with them.

Myself, I am the same. And it’s not that I have anything against group content, I just don’t care to be forced into interacting with random internet people. Those people have expectations and, sadly, in this day and age are not always civil in expressing their displeasure when their expectations of your gameplay are not met. Some people prefer to avoid this in their entertainment.

I suspect Witches, like myself, is fine with grouping with friends… it is being *forced* to group with strangers when you may not want to. Honestly, it made me quit FFXIV even though its community is the most friendly.

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David Blair

“Welcome to Wings! I’m sorry. Our tables only seat 4, so I’ll have to place you with three other ‘randos’… here we are. One of them smokes, and the one next to you gets angry if you don’t finish your meal in under five minutes. Enjoy your experience!”

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Robert Mann

Yeah, now if we could just get developers off the idea that combat has to be a constant and all the content…

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Loopy

– Holding the storyline hostage behind a grind – automatic no-no
– Any sort of excessive griding that will take months to complete
– Cross-system pollination – being pidgeon-holed into one type of content in order to be able to do other type of content

quark1020
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quark1020

Honestly, I get turned off by anything that requires a lot of grind. Some gear grinding isn’t too bad but, usually, faction rep or currency grinding really get on my nerves, especially if it can be measured in weeks or even months. I get we shouldn’t be devouring content in a couple of days, but these grinds are just padding, not real content. Then the fact that I know whatever I’m grinding this for is going to become irrelevant in the next expansion discourages me enough to not bother.

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life_isnt_just_dank_memes

Escort quests. Not gonna happen.

Can MMO makers please get their hands on some AI tech used to drive cars or drones becuase NPCs that need to be escorted are the pits.

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aleccia_rosewater

But there is a proper way of doing escort quests. Just look at some of the ’90’s space sims which umm oh wait those are examples of good level design which modern MMOs tend to lack

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Arktouros

Raiding.

While I understand that MMOs are inherently a social platform raids are just too much. I’ll spare the horror stories but essentially what it boils down to is it’s nearly impossible to find people low on the asshole scale but high on the competency scale. You usually end up compromising one way or another and it’s just a frustrating experience that I don’t want out of what I expect to be entertainment.

So if anything is locked behind raids, I basically consider it to not exist because it’s simply not an option.

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Dread Quixadhal

I’m an explorer type, so I generally love wandering around an open world map and doing all the quests, once. I also love doing dungeons or raids, a few times, until I’ve beaten them.

To me, the fastest way to make me stop playing a game is to water down things to “rush” you to the level cap, so you can be part of “endgame”. The whole concept of skipping to the last chapter of the book, and then reading it over and over and over again in the hopes of understanding the whole story from just the ending is crazy.

Daily quests, endless repeat runs of the same dungeons where the real enemy is the RNG not giving you the epic purple pants that magically unlock the next dungeon grind, sounds like a job that you’re not getting paid to do. No thanks.

I don’t object to “grinding”, or even repeating quests and dungeons, as long as it’s on my terms. If I feel like crafting, I don’t want to be told “NO SOUP FOR YOU! Go run dungeons!”

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Hirku

To me, the fastest way to make me stop playing a game is to water down things to “rush” you to the level cap, so you can be part of “endgame”.

I’m running out of patience with the whole genre because of this. Every MMO I play I have to plan out how to enjoy as much of the content as I can without becoming so overleveled that the monsters just stand passively waiting for me to one-shot them. At least put in a slow leveling option for those of us who don’t want to gain a billion XP when we kill a rat.

Coolit
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Coolit

Any content that makes me feel like I have to hit a cap each week to progress. This is why I prefer more sandbox esque games these days.

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CMDR Crow

I’d say any update that radically changes the core game(play) and approach to in-game systems. WoW lost me at Cata, while TSW lost me at EPE. Though, it is a bit of a Schrodinger’s Patch in that if I come to game after the big changes happened I barely notice. But if I’m playing and things change greatly under my feet it usually ends with me logging in less and less over time.

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Phubarrh

I’m OK with grinding Fates in FFXIV, it’s having to run the same dungeons for the 300th time that leaves me cold and glowy weaponless.

deekay_plus
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deekay_plus

probably dailies.

i’d love to see something like swg’s mission terminals come back in place of dailies. for some reason even tho they are effectively dailies by any other name, the nuances of them vs what became the cliche of dailies is somehow rather enjoyable to me. they are not only rewarding to do solo, they can be stacked with a full group of 20 players 2 each with everyone in the group getting the rewards of every mission they participate in.

where as dailies in an mmo take me less than a week to becoming rather hostile towards doing them.

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Castagere Shaikura

You know what would be really interesting for MOP to do. Go out and find a group of ex mmo players and ask them why they don’t play anymore. That would really be something that is never done by sites like this.

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Carebear

there are many people who stopped playing MMOs and had their reasons told, but the players who still play MMOs does not give them any credit, and instead they play down their reasons by simple say “nah, you are just burned out bro, take a break and see you again”

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aleccia_rosewater

And the existence of those crying masses should prevent such an article from being written because why?

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Utakata

The anecdotal reasoning of each person may skew the objectivity of the endeavor? Perhaps a more statistical approach is needed. But even that has it’s pitfalls. (Also see: Pointless polls.)

Furthermore, I am pretty sure if MOP had the time, money and energy they would put together something of this nature. And presuming they can guarantee objectivity of such an initiative so it wouldn’t be waste.

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Castagere Shaikura

Forcing people to group is never a good thing. Game devs wanting people to group up are so doing it wrong. I remember how the group content in GW2 worked when the game launched. You didn’t need to be grouped to kill a boss in the game world. You just had to show up and help and this was fun for everyone no matter what gear they were wearing and you got reward chest too. They need to make all group content in all mmo’s like this. As long as they keep forcing people to group to get special rewards the worse it will get for mmo’s. This trend needs to stop. I used to know so many mmo players and now non of them play. They got tired of the people playing them.

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Duane Does not check email

The appeal of mmo is other people being there…. otherwise it’s wasted code. I am not the most social but I genuinely like interacting with others as more than a target for them to shoot and call f@cker

However, I do agree there are times I want to get the away from others and should have still have some features, tasks, missions I can do on my own.

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Paul

I couldn’t disagree more tbh

borghive
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borghive

I disagree, grouping and playing with others was really the main appeal that attracted many players to the genre in the first place. If anything, the deviation away from these systems is what is contributing to the decline of the genre.

If you need evidence of this look no further than the popularity of co-op gaming right now. Survival games, Mobas, team shooters all have force grouping in them, and many of them got their ideas from older MMOs that required team play.

K38FishTacos
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K38FishTacos

Grouping is great and I enjoy it. I just don’t want to be told that I need to group. Then it feels like I’m being told how to play the game. If you want to put cool loot, etc., behind group-based content as an incentive, that’s fine, but don’t tell me how to play, especially once you’ve let me start off soloing and doing my own thing. Let it be an option rather than a roadblock.

I like the way The Division does it, actually. I can solo all the content (except most incursions) and get the gear I want, even though it may take longer. Often feel like grouping and do group. But sometimes I just want to play at my own pace.

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CMDR Crow

I absolutely agree, borghive. I’ve been feeling “meh” about a lot of MMORPGs I have, in the past, been quite excited to play and a great deal of that comes from feeling so… isolated in many of these worlds.

Thinking back to my first hours in WoW vanilla when I poked into every little nook and cranny, with old friends and new friends, I wish I still played games like that. But the “solo-ization” of MMOs has really allowed people to be even more isolated in large, shared worlds.

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TomTurtle

Anything that requires PvP or raiding discourages me. I suck at PvP, and I have no interest in raiding due to the time commitment.

I’m not too fond of when MMOs have rewards tied into multiple game modes including either of those two. As much as I understand the developers trying to entice players into other modes, I’d rather they just make the modes fun first and not try cheap reward tactics that only make me feel left out and bitter. I really have to wonder how many people would participate in something like raiding if the rewards weren’t oh so exclusive.

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thalendor

PvP anything. I do the occasional round of PvP, but once I’m asked to grind PvP I know the reward is just not going to be worth it for me. I take it as a blessing, then, that most MMOs don’t put PvE rewards behind a PvP gate because the reverse still seems to be fairly common.

Siphaed
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Siphaed

In a post-HoT GW2: Raiding.

In a pre-HoT GW2: Excessively stacked “shopping lists” of grinding needed to complete a project. The up and coming seasonal holidays Halloween & Wintersday are major examples of such a problem Needing to literally spend dozens to hundreds of hours killing the same mobs in a particular ‘train’ rotation in order to whatever prize the thing gives.

Why is that a necessity in games? Why should I have to kill the same boss 30 times in order to obtain an object that ties with their death, when it should only be a single death?! Mobs being the same thing. If I need 25 candy-cane arms in order to make a candy staff, I should have to only kill 25 candy-cane minions. They’re not all missing all their arms, no matter how much I blow them up. This goes back to early vanilla WoW were a quest for wild boar kidneys (10, I think) required to kill something between 50-75 of those low spawning demonic beasts just because less than 1 in 5 actually had a kidney! What in all of creation?!

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BalsBigBrother

Just me applying the word project to any activity in an mmo would be enough to put me off doing the thing. I don’t tend to plan ahead too much when it comes to games and just do whatever takes my fancy when I switch the computer on. So something that doesn’t seem appealing one day may well be the next.

What all this means is I don’t really have an actual good answer to the question asked :p

K38FishTacos
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K38FishTacos

The forced grouping quest. The one where the quest giver says, “Make sure you bring some friends.” I just hate that for some reason.

I don’t mind grouping and doing dungeons, but when you get to that first quest where they want you to group and you can’t continue without doing the group quest, I just don’t want to do it.

For me, I’d rather it be that there is a really cool dungeon over here and it’s fun and you can get some cool loot if and when you want to do it.

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starbuck1771

I know all about those been doing them a long time as a matter of fact I have done a few for rogue class missions for Legion in just the past 24 hours for WoW.

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starbuck1771

The No-Win scenario. I understand the quests where your supposed to fail (Due to storyline) but I still hate them with a passion.

deekay_plus
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deekay_plus

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