WoW Factor: World of Warcraft’s Battle for Azeroth has a weak conflict for a strong focus

The last time I saw this many people asking “why?” about a new World of Warcraft expansion was at the announcement of Mists of Pandaria. I agreed then, too; the idea of bringing in the Pandaren to the game seemed to be slipping into territory that just didn’t feel appealing to me. I’m still not entirely sold on the idea, a fact which is not helped at all by the fact that the very next expansion was so creatively bankrupt the team seems to have thrown every good idea at once into Legion.

Really, we don’t know what happened behind the scenes of Warlords of Draenor development, but that seems like a plausible theory.

So, yes, Battle for Azeroth. That is the actual title of the next expansion, one which feels almost as if it was cobbled together by drawing a few random words that usually get used with the game and hoping they assembled a coherent sentence. It seems, at face value, like a really dumb idea, especially since the very basic premise is one that you know is absolutely not going to be resolved by the end of the expansion.

Up to this point, every single expansion has had an obvious face of the Big Bad pretty early on. That doesn’t mean that it was always immediately obvious who the “final” boss would be, but you knew that The Burning Crusade was going to force us to go up against Illidan. There was enough discontent going into Mists of Pandaria that it was obvious Garrosh was becoming a problem, and the Sha burst onto the forefront with enough vigor to really take center stage right off. We know whom we’re fighting.

And in each and every case, those villains get to be put down, usually with finality, and without rising again. Assuming you do the raids, anyway. (Pay attention to this; it’ll be important later.)

It was this guy. He was the villain. He's a jerk. Let's deal with that.

Battle for Azeroth has an enemy implied by the title, but it is abundantly clear that this can’t actually be resolved in an absolute fashion. We know, as players, that neither the Horde nor the Alliance can actually win because that breaks the game. Thus, we also know that this is going to be a case where we get the football yanked away at the last second, that something bigger and more dangerous is going to start needling us in the side until we have to deal with that.

By then, what will have been accomplished? Another attempt to drive a wedge between the factions, another illustration for the players that it would make sense to work together. Isn’t that kind of pointless?

I don’t think it is. And while there’s totally a point to be made about the fact that we’ve all spent a huge chunk of time in Legion working with the cross-factions Class Orders, I think that’s entirely the point.

One of the things that bugged me from the game’s launch was the fact that Horde and Alliance players couldn’t interact in any meaningful way. That bothered me because it didn’t sell the faction divide; it weakened it. If you have to go fight a Tauren who’s out harassing Southshore, that’s just a chore you have to do; if that Tauren is your friend on the other faction whom you party with, you suddenly have a real emotional stake in what’s happening.

We, as players, have never gotten that with players on the other faction. But those of us who pay attention to the lore and have been seeing how senseless this divide really is now get to watch it claim things around us yet again. We get to see leaders who want to win at all costs take control, doing damage, and ultimately ensure that the long-simmering cold war is finally bursting to absolute heat.

But even that isn’t why I ultimately found this compelling, and I found myself struggling to figure out why my reaction to the expansion announcement was so much more positive than even the very premise would suggest. I play both factions and have long been a fan of the idea that the current faction divide is arbitrary and not great. Why would I want this to take center stage?

Then it hit me. Because every other expansion has given us an end boss.

How's everybody doing? I feel like it's my turn to be the boss now.

The goal of Wrath of the Lich King was to get up to the Lich King’s lair and punch him until he died. Period stop. Every other thing that you did was, ultimately, a side activity designed to make it easier to accomplish that goal or provide you with more power for when you reached that goal. And you either got to the top of the raid and killed the hell out of Arthas, or you let the story peter out somewhere shy of its conclusion.

In fact, that’s been something that’s bugged me about the game’s core structure for years. It was at its worst in Warlords of Draenor, where the story literally made no sense unless you were following along with the raids, but this problem has been shot through every expansion. Don’t like raiding? The Burning Crusade ends with your killing a boss you never actually faced the first time and then assuming someone else will take care of the actual Sunwell.

But the conflict in Battle for Azeroth cannot be resolved that way. If neither side can really win, you can’t have a final raid to conclude the story that’s been going on the whole time; at best, you have a final raid to conclude something else that’s been going down. Putting the focus on the Alliance and the Horde at war means that suddenly there isn’t one story to follow along; there are lots of little stories, all of them going on all over the place.

The last time that was true about the game’s story? Vanilla. Sure, Kel’thuzad was the hardest boss, but he wasn’t really the final boss. We bounced around fighting various problems all over the place, and there was no sense that all of the conflicts had been building to Naxxramas; that was just our last port of call before the Dark Portal opened.

Every conflict is important.What’s the best part of Legion’s storytelling? It’s not the “unifying” story about Illidan; it’s all of the diverse stories going on elsewhere. It’s the zone quests that let you get to know and explore what’s going on with the Vrykul, with the Highmountain Tauren, with Malfurion making all the wrong decisions yet again. It’s working to help the Nightborne rise up and fight back against a ruler who sold her people out. It’s bringing an order together to work as a unified force. It’s side stories.

What makes me excited is that Battle for Azeroth does seem to have the weakest overall thrust to “here is the big bad.” But the result is that there’s lots of space to do everything. It was the sort of wide-open feeling that we actually got when Mists of Pandaria launched; when you don’t have to bend everything to “kill the baddie,” you’re free to focus on other things.

In truth, it feels like a features-based expansion. There’s a lot of different new systems being put forth here, and glory of glories, they actually seem to be mechanics that can carry forward if the designers see people like them. Artifacts became too top-heavy almost instantly; Warfronts, by contrast, are a type of content that actually could continue along in the future. Ditto island exploration. Ditto allied races. You get the idea.

And that makes it a breather expansion. A welcome one, in a sense, one that feels a bit more grounded than it otherwise would be. There’s a conflict here, but it’s one that we’ve given rise to ourselves, a case where compassion and forgiveness is sidelined. It’s the classical definition of a tragedy, where we all know the consequences and the fact that things could be better even as we see things not being better.

But it’s also a conflict that doesn’t have a good guy and a bad guy to beat up. It’s a chance to explore things where lots of individual parts all have relevance to the present.

Bringing the game back to its roots, to me, means bringing it away from everything being about fighting the central bad guy. It’s about central conflicts that don’t get resolved by one side (ours) winning and the other side losing. It’s about a world where a lot of things are going on, and the player characters are special not simply by virtue of special artifacts but by being able to act outside of the chaos.

So I’m all right with this. Even if that title really is terrible. Seriously, why not just go with World of Warcraft: Tides of Darkness? It at least makes sense.

War never changes, but World of Warcraft does, with a decade of history and a huge footprint in the MMORPG industry. Join Eliot Lefebvre each week for a new installment of WoW Factor as he examines the enormous MMO, how it interacts with the larger world of online gaming, and what’s new in the worlds of Azeroth and Draenor.
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61 Comments on "WoW Factor: World of Warcraft’s Battle for Azeroth has a weak conflict for a strong focus"

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kody

Battle for Azeroth has multiple meanings, the most important of which is the titan world soul Azeroth. She’s currently dying (well, will be–after the events of Antorus) and so the actual battle is to save her. That is the central point of the expansion.

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Oleg Chebeneev

>Then it hit me. Because every other expansion has given us an end boss.

This expansion will also have end boss. We gonna fight Queen Azshara and probably Old God. Im surprised you didnt mention it since it was in dev panels on Blizzcon

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Malcolm Swoboda

Dude this is just a light camoflage for an Old God behind it all. Spoiler I guess lol.

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Kevin Smith

Actually feel the opposite of most of the article. I think they needed to go back to a more horde vs alliance feeling. That was the premise of the game to begin with, not some lets hold hands and run through the field crap we have gotten the lately. They needed to concentrate more on the rivalry an bring back that feeling my faction is the better one for a lot of people. The level scaling is the only thing that I don’t really like, because it will destroy going back and running older content for transmogs solo. Don’t want to have to get a group together to go run a raid from 4 or 5 years ago so I can get a weapon skin. On the flip side of that it is a way to make older content a little more relevant, but shouldn’t be done this late in the game.

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Theodrax

I just want an expansion that doesn’t center around badguys with green fire, green goo, or some other form of fel energy. I’m tired of evil green magic.

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Ben Stone

I think the Old Gods and the Void will end up being the main villains in the second half of the expansion, once the cross faction conflict has played out.

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Bruno Brito

Call me crazy, but i’m optimistic. The open-endedness that this xpac info has is something i’m expecting to surprise me in a good way. The leveling changes are something i’m really hyped for.

borghive
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borghive

The title is a play on words, we will fighting some kind of threat for sure.

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Utakata

Welp…titles such as “Battle for Azeroth, Because We’ve Run Out of Ideas” sounds a little bit too self defeating if not wordy. Where as titles such as, “Making Azeroth Great Again” has already been done by some internet dev with 200 k petition in hand. Or, “Azeroth Hardcore, Cupcake” may scare off the dedicated playership…while only appealing to the 1% old skool raid/PvP types, might just end up hurting Blizz’s bottom line. And so on…

…so BfA, a vague title which could allow Blizz to do anything without upsetting the core players too much, while attempting to capture some of the “lost” magic of the original game in all its mediocracy.

Or tl,dr: Blizz might be looking ass backwards again. And we know how that worked out for Warlords. /sigh

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Dreema

I find it really hard to get excited about BfA. It’s still early days yet and we don’t really know much about it, but it seems a much less interesting idea than Legion. From facing off against the Ultimate Bad to facing off against… each other. Didn’t we already have that MoP? I think part of me is just tired of the unending Alliance v Horde conflict because we all know that one side will never decisively win and it seems more like the kind of expansion Blizzard put out while they’re working on their next cool idea. Kinda like WoD was a filler expansion to give them time to work on Legion.

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Malcolm Swoboda

MoP was facing Sha (helping Pandarans before we make it worse there) then facing each other then facing Garrosh With Sha Power.

BfA looks more like facing each other (more focus than ever, other than Vanilla’s lovely open world PvP haha), then facing Old God behind this. The ‘battle for Azeroth’, is the hint. Its the title. They don’t want to give away the villainous plot this time.

Warcraft has always had facing each other and it’ll always have that in the future. It is franchise essentials. Humans vs Orcs, then Alliance vs Horse, and gradually All Sorts vs All Sorts (though maybe not in this game as much as a future game would).

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Bryan Gregory

The WC2 Tides of Darkness slogan “The Battle for Azeroth continues over land, sea, and air” with the combination of the “red island” vs the “blue island” has me in high high hopes we’ll be getting our own ships and zeppelins, with the ability to outfit them with various types of weapons and technology. Perhaps guilds can acquire even larger vehicles. Maybe instead of taking over simple nodes, we’ll be taking over entire islands!

I’m glad the Horde vs. Alliance conflict is returning (hopefully to stay). I’d love to see the game get more PVP attention too. Sometimes I really have to wonder just how many people have no idea that Warcraft existed before WoW, and that Warcraft wasn’t all about the next big boss trying to destroy the world. Also I feel as though I’m the only person I know who’s excited for Warfronts, even though it’s PVE content. Hoping for a PVP version eventually. I’m perfectly OK with playing Warcraft RTS maps in WoW, it’s what I wanted all along.

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Rottenrotny

I started reading this thinking “Oh, boy. Here we go.. a carebear -why can’t horde and alliance just be friends?!?- article, and was pleasantly surprised that it wasn’t! ^_^

That being said, I hadn’t though about BfA in that way, but I think you’re right. For once the point of the expansion doesn’t seem like it’s pointing you along the leveling path to the big bad and then you’re done. Kinda refreshing.

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Malcolm Swoboda

I think Horde and Alliance can be friends but its unlikely to really happen in a World of Warcraft game. Maybe WoW can set up, and maybe already is setting up a future where this changes, just as we moved out of requiring Orcs vs Humans in the 90s, but its not happening now.

I wouldn’t mind a future story in a future game where Horde and Alliance are a couple of several empires and geopolitical regions that cover the world, and there being often more nuance (with occasional flashpoints of conflict and dire worldthreatening events) going on. We have all these other factions and growing groups and nations that are getting in on the fray and there’s more potential for fun stories to come from that. Its just WoW is based on Horde vs Alliance and has perpetuated it so much that the most we can get away from that is the dream and hope for peace to come (something MoP story pushes hard but acknowledges is not happening soon). I think dropping the conflict might betray what makes WoW WoW, but leaving it to transition to an even better conflict (perhaps still with often certain sorts of people on certain sides) can and perhaps should happen in any future game.

wrathofmogg
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wrathofmogg

Taken at face value, the “Battle for Azeroth” title is dumb. But it’s actually kind of clever because it has a double meaning. Sure it’s about Horde vs. Alliance fighting for territory, but there’s a larger story that Blizzard has been hinting at. The strike from Sargeras is literally killing the planet, and we’ll have to fight against that at some point in order to save Azeroth.

So while the Horde and Alliance are fighting their faction war, we heroes will have to overcome the forces ripping the planet apart. Thus, Battle for Azeroth. I think it’s perfect.

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Sorenthaz

Yeah and the whole side-progression element revolves around collecting Azerite, literally the blood of Azeroth (the Titan soul growing within the core of the planet) as she’s suffering from all the damage that everything (the Legion, past conflicts, present conflicts) have done and are doing to her.

It’s probably going to have a Mists of Pandaria repeat in the end in that we’ll realize how much we’re tearing the planet apart and the next expansion after BfA or the last major patch of BfA will reveal some big bad who’s come to capitalize on Azeroth’s vulnerability.

Sounds like Sargeras isn’t being rid of for good in Legion, but at least is being dealt a tremendous blow to the Burning Legion’s reach and power. Part of the reason Sargeras has been on a hell path is due to wanting to protect the universe from the Void Lords (by destroying it… /logic), so it’s possible that Sargeras or the Void Lords could become a focus in the next expansion.

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Malcolm Swoboda

I think MoP presents the more isolated dream and possibility of peace (after years of vainly attempting even a truce between H and A) but BfA will hopefully present characters and factions something more tangible by the end of its cycle. Something that acknowledges the differences everyone has but also acknowledges realistic (for the setting and plot that is) paths to overcome them.

And I don’t know the game a lot but I haven’t gathered that Sargeras is gone, but rather that the bulk of the threat of the Burning Legion is over (at least for any WoW-focus before any other game might happen). So demons and fel magic can still be utilized for storylines, and Sargeras may be anything from a future bigger enemy to a surprising ally. We just won’t be getting a big ol’ Legion invasion again in WoW, barring stupid Blizzard choices.

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Sorenthaz

Given what I looked up, yeah Sargeras will still be around just a wee bit ‘occupied’ for the time being. It’s very possible that he could be turned into an ally when the Void Lords come, especially when a certain character still hasn’t fully reached the point where he saw himself in a vision that a N’aaru gave him during one part of a certain novel, and that character is going to be a key element in keeping Sargeras away from the rest of the universe.

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Ironweakness

So far Eliot is doing a better job of selling me on this expansion than Blizzard is. Between making a convincing argument for the blue vs. red storyline and explaining the Heart of Azeroth in a way that actually makes sense, I’m starting to warm up to the idea of playing Battle for Azeroth.

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Dug From The Earth

If we could up vote the actual article, this would be the first Eliot article that I would up vote.

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Rottenrotny

I don’t normally agree with his points of view, but I think he’s onto something here.

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Red Galaxie

It feels like a swan song expansion to me.

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Malcolm Swoboda

Plot and setting wise, there’s at least a few more expansions they can do. WoW can certainly survive or even thrive through the 2020s, as long as they keep putting the requires resources (development, marketing, player engagement) into it. Especially if they indeed make timecapsule separate games of previous versions of WoW to retain nostalgianerds.

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Jeremy Barnes

then you’re likely drunk, high and insane

what-4
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what-4

HA, no.

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Iain B

The premise for this newly revitalized conflict between the Horde and Alliance is so forced and just comes across flat.

The Alliance is pissed because the Horde “left the Alliance hanging” on the Broken Shore and Varian died as a result. The problem is that the Horde retreated because their Warchief WAS killed and they were going to be wiped out themselves.

Can you really tell me that no one from the Horde bothered to just explain what happened? “Uhh, our Warchief died and we were surrounded so we had to retreat. We didn’t double-cross you, we were going to be wiped out after our Warchief was killed!”

And now we have Anduin, the character who was always so focused on brokering peace, now all gung-ho and wanting to kill them all.

P.S. Since when do priests wear plate and wield swords?

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Joshua Dickerson

I dont think its forced or comes off flat from a perspective of the leaders of each side.

We as people outside of the game have the bonus of seeing the whole story unfold from both sides. Whether it be from cutscenes or just general discussions with eachother. The leaders and character’s in-game have only their personal perspective to go off on. The main people who would be “in the know” of what decisions were made and why are (Horde) Sylvannas, other horde leaders and (Alliance) Genn, Mekatork (sp?), anyone else on ground level. It doesn’t matter if Vol’jin died during that battle because whether he did or not, she called for retreat and it abandoned the Alliance. Mortals tend to have a failing factor of not having benevolent God like forgiveness.

The who first part of the expansion dealt with the percieved betrayal. And immediately after that we get the events in Stormheim which pit Genn and Sylvannas against one another. Simultaneously we as characters were solely acting on behalf of our order halls which in scope of the expansion was very limited interaction with “faction politics”. We as individuals were outside of it. We also had to effectively call a tenative “truce” to save us from the Legion, but Genn/Sylvannas/Anduin (main people “hurt” over this) never hashed it out nor did they have the desire to.

Anduin lost his father due to the betrayal of Sylvannas. Genn just got done trying to kill Sylvannas. Both Genn and Anduin have had someone they love killed due to her decisions. Sylvannas had the immortality and salvation of her people ended by Genn. They hold grudges. Anduin has to react as a king now, he is no longer solely the passifist Priest he used to be. His father’s death proved he can no longer hold that position in totality.

Sylvannas is the leader of the Horde and she isnt the “let me explain my reasons” type of person. She does what she wants and answers to no one, especially the Horde.

(sorry for the wall of text, I can see your point, just offering my side of how I see it)

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Rottenrotny

I’m excited for the expansion but I agree with most of what you said. Horde didn’t betray the Alliance at Broken Shore, they had no choice. The fact that Vol’Jin died and no one on the Alliance even mention the fact is dumb.

what-4
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what-4

Hero characters have NEVER really followed class rules.

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Malcolm Swoboda

I disagree. I think Hero characters embody the classes. Even if not current ones, then examples for future ones. I would not be surprised at all at a future patch, 9.0, or 10.0 that introduces a Hero class that is some embodiment of something of the Light (maybe with some elaborated twist) , with thematic elements of both Priest and Paladin included. I still consider Anduin essentially a Priest, but he’s been written to be more than that and with a bigger destiny from the writers. (EDIT: ‘Lightforged’ Draenei might be part of this push.

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TheDonDude

I’m perfectly fine with getting back to fightin’ those scum sucking Hordeys and/or Alliance, given it’s been a while since we did that, provided the story explains the reasoning well enough.

Will Blizzard’s writing be up to the task? Ha ha haha ha he heh heh… heh, hah… well, we’ll see.

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Iain B

Blizzard announced that they hired Christie Golden back in May. Considering she has written a number of well-received WoW-related novels this might be good news on that front.

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Rottenrotny

Her WoW books are quite good!

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TheDonDude

Fingers crossed, then!

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Dawn

I’m still betting this is going to be the Void Expansion. At some point we’ll all realize the Void is messing with us and we’ll have to band together to beat it back, and or continue to protect/save Azeroth herself, the world soul.

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Malcolm Swoboda

I don’t think this will be ‘the’ Void expansion but it will be the introduction of emphasis of it over most things (separate from ‘Shadow’, ‘Old Gods’, ‘Demons’, and such in themselves). I think this version will primarily be about the nature of the entity of Azeroth (where Catacylsm was more about greater explorations and digging into the histories of it). I think 9.0 or 10.0 may be the real ‘Void’ expansion.

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Dreema

I’d have much sooner had a Void expansion. I don’t want another expansion where we start off fighting one enemy then end up joining forces with them to fight another. (Yes, WoD, I’m looking at you here, you sorry excuse for an expansion.)

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Hirku

I have no idea what the Void or a world soul is, but I agree with your general idea completely. It’s going to start as a Battle for All the Stuff in Azeroth and it’s going to end as a Battle for the Sake of Azeroth. Seems ham-fisted to me, but masterful storytelling isn’t why I’m here.

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TheDonDude

I hope you’re wrong but you’re probably right. I think they should go the ICC Gunship route. For things like dungeons and raids, you just fight a boss of the opposite faction. Kinda like what SWTOR did for Assault/Defense of Tython/Korriban.

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Paragon Lost

Something, something, something. Mental gymnastics to come up with some way to turn a positive spin (Eliot throws out his back in the process) out of what has become a ridiculously stagnatic premise.

Awesome for you Eliot if it makes it easier to accept that the whole game world of Warcraft is ridiculously stagnant and silly. If they wanted to make the game world more fun, more immersive and less stagnant and silly they should have the damn game world and it’s factions evolve, change.

Have one (or more) of the races change factions, which really should have happened at least once in the history of WoW. That would be a awesome conflict change and would really get many players blood flowing. That’s just one quick and dirty idea, basically they need to make the damn factions mean something. Currently they’re a joke and have been for a long time.

Oh and I do love the Peanuts “Lucy and Charlie Brown” reference as an aside.

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TomTurtle

I was scratching my head on this one too. We’ve already seen some basic information about enemies we’ll face aside from the Horde and Alliance, and it is already sounding like any other expansion with how they sprinkle in side stories. Nothing new. And it’s likely that when the expansion transitions into the next, it’ll have already set up a new big bad long before the end of BfA.

I’m not hopeful at all that not immediately focusing on a big bad will mean the “diverse” side stories will be anything meaningful. The formula Blizzard has been using is already showing signs of repeated use for the next expansion. Set up some fleeting side stories to complement the leveling experience and then go hard on the main conflict.

And honestly, the Horde vs. Alliance conflict has long felt like a fallback story to return to so that Blizzard has more time to develop future stories. It’s far too formulaic. One thing I found initially appealing about Legion was how Blizzard threw in a lot of long-standing stories rather than doing another slow drip. (Admittedly, the premise for renewing conflict between both factions at the very start of Legion was monumentally stupid.)

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blah blazh

I think there should be more than just two factions. And with multiple factions, maybe have those allied with others depending on where the overarching story is at the moment. As it is now, it is incredibly stale. From someone who hasn’t really played much, if at all, since WotLK, it looks like WoW is just retreading and in a constant loop. The one exception to that was Mists of Panderia (which is the one expansion in which I lasted longer than a month).

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Jeffrey Meade

I would love a third faction. In all the MMO’s I played over the years the games more fun for me were the ones with either three factions or no factions.

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TheDonDude

Forcing players from one faction to another would be a hilariously awful idea.

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Rick Mills

Glad you got it. This hit me when they showed the image of Warcraft 2 (That Alexis shows below) and I had the same feeling – a breather so we can get back to the conflict of Azeroth.

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Jeffrey Meade

I’m not really excited by the new expansion or really anything in it so far. Its all “meh” for me. Legion brought me back to the game after not playing for years because I was pretty interested in what was coming, especially Demon Hunters. This new expansion really doesn’t have that one thing that really drives interest in the players. Its feels more like been there, done that. My other issue is putting systems in one expansion only to abandon it in the next. It seems like this has been more common since Garrisons. Based on what the developers said it seems like world quests are one of the few ideas continuing into the next expansion. Expansions seem to be turning more and more into one and done ideas that don’t continue past that expansion and I really don’t like that.

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Greaterdivinity

If they’re actually going to go all-in on the war and make it the centerpiece for once, and actually keep it up, I’m all for it.

But I’ve gotta say my hopes aren’t high. I can’t help but see this expansion having the same narrative arc of every other one so far – Horde and Alliance continue fighting over trivial nonsense blown out of proportion because their respective leaders decide to be complete idiots, they stop fighting to work together against some bigger baddie threatening everyone, they go back to the arbitrary faction conflict on similarly trivial grounds because writing a different expansion narrative is hard.

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Dug From The Earth

Possible Spoilers:

Spoiler
The leaks that have popped up over the last few months, all hint/point towards Azeroth being corrupted by the death of Argus’s titan. To the point where the planet turns against everyone, even corrupting Magni who is basically a mobile speaker for Azeroth itself. Even whispers of the Old Gods returning when they see this happening is something that could be on the table.

So yes, it seems like there is a very good chance it will be horde vs alliance at first, but will then switch to “Oh no, gotta focus on saving the planet now instead” later.

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Utakata

My bet is on the big baddie playing each side against each other, as the big reveal.

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silverlock

Good name, Good idea, it’s time to get back to basics, the endless stream of oh no the world is going to end expac’s was getting tedious.

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Alexis Duprey

comment image

The name comes from the Warcraft 2 manual

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Utakata

What a missed opportunity here. /sigh

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Rottenrotny

MS-DOS xD

Good times

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zeko_rena

Such a good game!

YOUR SOUND CARD WORKS PERFECTLY!

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Armsbend

Good expac. Bad one. Good one. Bad one. Pretty much across all video games.

Following this Natural Law Azeroth is going to be pretty bad. Expect the inevitable and we’ll be okay. Still getting it.

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Hirku

I’m easy to please. Good expansion = new lands to explore and new monsters to kick in the face.

what-4
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what-4

TBC good, Wrath Good, cata not great but not bad. Mop was divisive, not BAD I loved it and many others STILL call it the best or 2nd best xpac, WoD, yeh bad, Legion pretty good. SO no, its not some “natural law” as you suggest.

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Schmidt.Capela

Different people grade the expansions differently. For me, Vanilla was good, BC was better, WotLK was the best thing ever done to the game, Cataclysm was the worst thing ever done to the game, and MoP was more negative than positive.

I don’t know about the other ones because, between Cataclysm and MoP, I left WoW and haven’t returned since.

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starbuck1771

I don’t rate the games that way. I rate whats in the game / expansion. For instance I wouldn’t say WoD was bad but that Garrisons were bad because they served as a screw you to the part of the community that had been asking for player housing for years.

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