ARK 2 isn’t planned right now… but it’s still a real possibility

The good news for fans of ARK: Survival Evolved who are not in the mood to buy a sequel to the game at the moment? There isn’t one being developed right now. But ARK 2 is still not off the table according to one of the community managers; in fact, based solely on popularity, it seems inevitable.

We don’t have any plans for a sequel right now. But as has been stated, with the unprecedented popularity of the game, it would be a disservice to not expand on that through a sequel.

Why a sequel instead of just expansions? Because the development team has learned a lot over the course of bringing ARK to release, and that means a sequel could contain lessons learned about system design as well as back-end improvements to make the game easier to update and maintain. Of course, it’s all speculation right now, as one isn’t presently in the pipeline; the title did only recently move from early access into proper launch. Just don’t be surprised if you hear about one in the next few years.

Source: Official Site; thanks to Tanek for the tip!
SHARE THIS ARTICLE
Code of Conduct | Edit Your Profile | Commenting FAQ | Badge Reclamation | Badge Key

LEAVE A COMMENT

18 Comments on "ARK 2 isn’t planned right now… but it’s still a real possibility"

Subscribe to:
Sort by:   newest | oldest | most liked
Reader
Mark Mealman

Back end improvements seems like a valid reason for a reboot. The issue though is the version 2.0 nearly always has a content drought compared to the first 1.xx game that has had years of content.

DeadlyAccurate
Reader
Loyal Patron
Patreon Donor
DeadlyAccurate

Don’t even talk to me about a sequel if you’re not going to give me real animal AI behavior for the dinos. And while you’re at it, put some decently-cleaned UVs on the creatures so you can properly paint them.

Reader
Ket Viliano

Hey man, these are the guys who cannot get a ‘return’ key press to register properly in a password box.

Think about that dino paint. Now, extend that to realistic animal AI…

Reader
steve

Wildcard needs to step up their development game if they’re going to bring me back. That means hiring a senior programmer who knows how to properly hack an engine. They have great modelers and animators, and some clever ideas regarding game mechanics, but by their own admission they can’t seem to attract real software developers.

Reader
Melissa McDonald

Shrug, I don’t get the hate for this game. It’s never failed to deliver an experience that satisfied my dinosaur cravings. It HAS done well and console expansion has likely helped their bottom line a lot. I would welcome a sequel, why not?

Reader
steve

It’s that thin line between love and hate.

ARK is the most engaging game I’ve played since EQ/WoW. I’ve gotten far more than my money’s worth out of it and met some of the best people I’ve ever played with.

But they’ve also made some boneheaded decisions, engaged in practices (Overnerfing, for example) that tend to enrage players and show little capability/competence at fixing long-standing bugs. This is a game where you can lose hundreds of hours of investment to something like terrain clipping. A lot of issues that existed from Day 1 remain a problem.

I’d welcome a sequel, but would expect marked improvement in their development team/practices before I’d purchase it.

Reader
Ket Viliano

If you happen to be a software engineer, and you play this game a lot, you will start to notice a lot of little problems. Then one has to ask, “how did they code this?”, which provokes a response of “oh, dear”.

Game is still fun, which is why I keep playing, yet has a lot of small flaws, which mar the experience.

Reader
Tanek

You don’t even need to be a software engineer to notice problems. Plus, Wildcard came right out and said that they needed to learn the engine and hiring people who know how to work on it is difficult and expensive.

I fully believe the ARK devs put all they had into making the game. The art is amazing. The idea is amazing. They just had problems when it came to the tech and stepped out over a cliff holding a Wile E. Coyote sign that read “We can fix this!” Then they looked down.

Reader
Ket Viliano

Technology is one thing, but there are also some key game design issues.

Firstly, the conflict between PvP and PvE rulesets. This can be resolved, but has not been. The worst of this was the Bird Nerf. I can understand the PvP problem being that everyone winds up being in every fight, but for PvE the time spent flying is a waste. The game is very fast paced until you need to grind a ton of mats, or want to go somewhere.

Secondly, the darkness kills most low level game play, until you get NVG, which it self may be over done. With next to no light, I can’t see, and if I can’t see, I can’t play. The torch can not be wielded in the off hand to provide light while using a 1H weapon, which would go a long way toward solving the problem of the player having to wait for light to play the game. Also, a lantern for focused light, and for standing torches to have the same light throw as a held torch. For flying at night, light draw distances need to be vastly increased, and a lighthouse added to the game.

Third, let’s talk about game balance. While being able to crank up the rates for things like taming and mats is nice, at its core the game is not that well balanced. Turning up the drop rate meters throws off the drops. Ascendant gear has highly variable stats, with ridiculous material requirements on the BPs. Some saddles drop repeatedly, while many others do not drop at all.

There is more, but none of this stuff is dependent on technology, it depends on careful thought and playtesting.

I do think they have tried to do their best, and they did do fairly well overall. The game has been my defacto favorite for over two years now. I think I know what to expect from Studio Wildcard by now, and while I doubt things will change much, I hope for the best.

Reader
steve

If they did manage to attract a senior-level programmer, can you imagine the task of re-engineering whatever pile of spaghetti they have going?

In that regard, perhaps it would be best to just make a sequel.

Reader
rafael12104

What makes you think they would incorporate the lessons learned? They didn’t do this in early access, so…

Just saying.

Reader
Darthbawl

ARK2: The Need for More Bucks, pre-pre-pre-pre-order your early-early-early-access copy now!

Reader
Armsbend

Floating the idea of a sequel means they have been working on a sequel for quite some time now. Interest has flatlined.

Reader
thirtymil

Then they could use the sequel to learn about some more things! Like optimization, for example.

what-4
Reader
what-4

LoL they should worry about getting the current game fixed before even contemplating a sequel.

Reader
Tanek

I suspect we have already seen all the fixes to ARK that there will be.

One of the posts on that forum thread started with “Ark 2, it will be the game we all wanted this time around.” And I do think the developers would be able to put their experience to good use, but I also fear they would fall into the same traps.

ARK 2 might learn from the failures of ARK, but I see no reason to think Wildcard would change the basic template of early access, feature creep, and a base game that ends up not being stable enough to support the necessary fixes. why? Because apparently it works well enough for them.

So, as I said in that thread, I’d expect we might see another post years from now that starts “Ark 3, it will be the game we all wanted this time around.”

Reader
Ket Viliano

Just got most of the way done sorting out my gear on Ragnarok.

There are a great number of bugs in ARK, and I doubt the folks that made these problems are going to be able to fix them.

Reminds me a lot of Berkeley Unix and the C shell. Brilliant, but buggy. They have had some great ideas, pretty good art, yet plagued by mediocre execution.

Reader
Ittybumpkin

Surprised they did not start on the sequel while the first was still in early access. Early access certainly did not stop them from making an expansion

wpDiscuz