Perfect Ten: What to expect when you play World of Warcraft Classic

Are you ready to play the most anticipated MMORPG from 2004? It turns out that, yes, many of you are. The frenzy over World of Warcraft Classic is probably nowhere near its zenith yet, as the announcement of the server has sparked enormous amounts of conversation among the community.

While we most likely have a while to go before Blizzard’s time travel machine is complete, it is not too soon to start thinking about the logistics and reality that a legacy server will entail. The existing emulator community and a look at the past development and operation of vanilla World of Warcraft can give us an idea of what WoW Classic will be like, although Blizzard’s vision may differ in format, business model, and features.

What will it be like to jump back to the first year or two of World of Warcraft and play that version of the game? It’s going to be a drastic shock to veteran and new players alike, especially those who might have forgotten how MMOs used to operate back in the day. Here are 10 things to expect when you log in to Classic for the first time.

1. Combat will be slow

World of Warcraft is, by no means, a fast-paced action MMO these days, but the current version is lightspeed ahead of vanilla’s combat. Auto-attack will still be the meat-and-potatoes of many encounters, with special skills all sharing the same global cooldown, leading to a stately, measured pace of combat. Time-to-kill was a lot longer back then, and very few classes were pulling packs of mobs to burn them down with AoE in a few seconds flat.

2. Inventory space will be at a premium

Not that players have ever had enough inventory in World of Warcraft to satisfy them, but it was particularly dire at launch. Just about everything had to be thrown into bags, including mounts, pets, keys, and reagents for certain spells. And Arthas help you if you happened to roll a Hunter or Warlock, because your inventory would be taken over by ammo and soul shards out the wazoo.

3. Skills will need to be trained, leveled, and even quested

You know how there are those useless class trainers standing around in the game these days? Once upon a time, they actually had a purpose, which was to serve as a skill vendor. Once they leveled up, players would head back to vendors to buy new skills and additional ranks of existing skills (and you could choose to slot older versions of skills if you so desired). To make things more interesting, there were some skills that you couldn’t buy but had to go through a special quest to obtain. Sounds cool, but usually these were a pain in the polygon behind to do.

4. Some classes will be broken or underpowered

Probably the biggest shock to modern WoW players will happen when they see the earlier incarnations of their classes. By and large, there was no balance here; some classes were definitely OP while others were broken and borderline useless. This was especially noticeable in groups, as Druids (for example) pretty much only existed to Innervate Priests, and Paladins were little more than buff machines.

5. The world will be smaller and more barren

With only two continents making up the launch game, World of Warcraft wasn’t so much “world” as it was “a bunch of zones quilted into a Frankenstein monster.” Many zones on the continents weren’t present yet, and the ones that were had less content (especially the higher in level one went). The upside? Players on Classic will see the pre-Cataclysm versions of these zones and hear the original music. That might cheer some folks up who are still holding a grudge over the changes that Cataclysm brought.

6. Travel will be painstakingly slow

Hope you are the patient sort, because just about everything in World of Warcraft Classic is going to take a lot of time — including getting from point A to B. For forty levels, you’ll be doing nothing more than trotting on foot across the world, occasionally using boats, zeppelins, and hearthstones to facilitate travel. Even when you do cobble together 90 gold for your first mount, it’s not going to be the zippy ride that you enjoy today (heck, even summoning a mount takes seconds longer in vanilla than it currently does!).

7. Quests will be anemic and underwhelming

There’s no question that the questing system was the centerpiece of why World of Warcraft became a smash hit at launch. It refined what was previously a scattered and somewhat obtuse and awkward approach in other MMOs, offering easy-to-understand mechanics, a regular hit of rewards, and a more driven purpose than merely wandering and farming mobs.

Still, the launch quests are not going to be the refined experiences that the game enjoys today. There weren’t enough of them, especially after level 20, and some were far more frustrating than enjoyable to pursue. Ask anyone who spent hours farming goretusk livers or zhevra hooves about the “fun” factor of early WoW quests.

8. Dungeon crawling won’t be as accessible

While there will be several classic dungeons at launch, heading into one will prove to be an adventure in its own right. With no looking-for-group tool, no meeting stone summoning functionality, and elite mobs guarding the often twisty-turny way in, simply getting a group together and to the front door is going to require more coordination and effort. Small price to pay to see the old Deadmines again, right?

9. Talent trees will be a thing again

Remember talent trees? Blizzard brought these over from Diablo II and increased their functionality, giving players more of a say about how their characters were developed. With one point per level and those coveted top-tier abilities waiting for your level 40 character to enjoy, talent trees dominated a lot of the vanilla theorycrafting before Blizzard redid them like fifteen times.

10. Barrens chat will introduce Chuck Norris jokes to a whole new generation

Kids these days have no idea what Barrens chat was like. They’re about to find out. God have mercy on their souls.

Everyone likes a good list, and we are no different! Perfect Ten takes an MMO topic and divvies it up into 10 delicious, entertaining, and often informative segments for your snacking pleasure. Got a good idea for a list? Email us at justin@massivelyop.com or eliot@massivelyop.com with the subject line “Perfect Ten.”
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Grim🎃 Darhk

you old timers saying slow boring combat takes “Skill” and is more “difficult.” Amuse the ever living hell out of me. Bloody neck beards in your forties thinking things are more pure and make you an elite gamer. Ha. Fucking. Ha. Slow combat is not better. Not even a little. Nothing is good about waiting for ten seconds to use a single judgement, nothing. (or you know, a minute back in Vanilla, oh yeah those were the good fucking days.)

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Alex Malone

Its all about combat depth, which I’ve heard vanilla WoW had.

Slow can indeed be boring, but I’d much rather play a slow combat game where each skill use required a meaningful decision, compared to a modern action spam fest where it doesn’t make much difference what skill you use, just keep spamming! So, a skill with a 1m cooldown, you actually have to think about whether to use it or not.

A game with a lot of combat depth actually allows for player skill to shine through. You become a better player by learning more about the mechanics and becoming better at thinking through decisions, rather than an action combat game where you become better simply by spending more time in game to increase your muscle memory.

It isn’t a style of combat suited to everyone, some people love mindless spamming of buttons. But for those of us who enjoy actual player skill and depth, this server is a good thing.

unojc
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unojc

Does this mean I can drag the Butcher to Goldshire again?

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Oleg Chebeneev

As a veteran vanilla player I disagree with many of these points.
1. Combat isnt much slower then current WoW. In both versions skills are still limited by global cooldown. The biggest notable difference will be that particle effects and animations in vanilla are much worse. Also there are much more skills available in vanilla then now.

4. There werent weak, underpowered or broken classes. Druid that you mention as useless class could be amazing in right hands with right gear. Every single class in vanilla could be great in the hands of skilled and geared player.

5. While world indeed was smaller, vanilla world never felt small and definetly never felt barren. In fact its exact opposite. World will feel much more alive and less barren then it is now where you barely even meet other players. Play popular vanilla private servers. There is something going on EVERYWHERE and some zones are bloodbath.

6. Definetly slower then now, but travelling never been a big issue after you get your first mount.

9. If there ever was theorycrafting about vanilla talents, it was in the very early days of vanilla. Then all builds were copypasted and there was almost zero room for experiments cuz many talents were just useless compared to others. With how much less talents there are now, they provide more freedom and choice then lengthy talent trees in vanilla.

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johnwillo

But will my old mods work again? (Rhetorical, I know that we don’t know.) I miss Benecast…

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Utakata

“4. Some classes will be broken or underpowered:”

I am pretty sure Blizz will make sure there will be some class balance when they release this beast, as they spent several patches back-in-the-day rectifying a lot of those issues. It is something they will unlikely want to address again. However, I am pretty sure everything thing else on Mr. Justin’s list and then some will be in there.

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Cinaminson

Yep. I’m looking forward to it.

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Crowe

90 gold for a mount? I must have started later than I thought. I recall 20 gold but we didn’t have that much even when trying to save up by the time we hit level 40.

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thalendor

And if you wanted a mount that wasn’t your race’s default, you needed to work at getting reputation with the other faction. And I’m not saying that as a bad thing. I remember one of my goals for a while was to get one of the Night Elf mounts (as a Human) so I was one of the relatively few Human characters riding around on something other than horse. It really actually felt like an accomplishment.

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Crowe

Oh yeah, I totally remember the faction grind. It was just the 90/20 thing that threw me. :)

cryinglightning39
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cryinglightning39

A lot of it sounds like FFXIV. I’m interested in trying mostly for the PvP.

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Carebear

yeap, thats exactly, stay out folks. You are not gonna like it… (/sarcasm)

1) Rotation are not a guitar hero play, push the correct button as fast as possible… is strategic and resource management and slow. Besides, you are not only there to do DPS but to support your group, and use the environment to your advantage.

2) Yea traveling is a thing. It makes the world feel bigger. I used to have a play session just to go and open some flight paths and took me some hours. No problem, I like travelling and chatting with my guild on the way.

3) Dungeons wont be easily accessible as the article say, so if you happen to find a run, be nice and helpful, cause if you get kicked you cant magically push a button again and find 4 NPCs *couch* I mean players to do the next dungeon.

4) Some specs are better than others, some classes are better at one role. Fine. Classes are not homogenized.. every class play unique and have strengths and weaknesses. Thats RPG …

5) Quests will not be super linear and hold your hand for a “on rails” experience for brain dead monkeys. They are scattered around the world. But they are challenging and you will find many elite quests with great rewards and also you will find some epic questlines that are no longer ingame for some reason.

and no, world will not be smaller… first time in your life you will actually feel you are part of a world.. you will immerse in it and you will remember every inch of it. But even the best adventurers sometimes want to cut corners, so be nice and friendly to mages.

My advice is TRY it… dont let negative articles affect you.. Vanilla is not convenient, but is RPG and a great adventure.

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Mark

11. Fighting, leveling, and completing quests will take more time and actually have some challenge, so you may experience slight feelings of accomplishment and enjoyment while playing the game. If this happens, my recommendation is to stop playing Classic and log onto a lower-level character on Live to remove those bothersome feelings.

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Jeremiah Wagner

CANT WAIT!!!!! So excited!!!

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Armsbend

10. Now it is 2. Trade Chat and it is arguments about Trump.

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Bryan Correll

11. If you venture into Silverpine Forest at its overall intended levels, Sons of Arugal will f*** you up.

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Daniel Reasor

12. SHE IS RIGHT THERE.

Wowhead_Mankrik's_Wife.jpg
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Anthony Clark

WTB SOW, and CLARITY, or BREEZE, PST!
Selling Wiz Ports, PST!
Meet up at commonlands tunnel!

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Michael18

The launch quests are not going to be the refined experiences that the game enjoys today.

These “refined experiences” are what drove me away from retail WoW. I loved the more chaotic quest layout of the old 1-60 zones, where finding quests was part of the adventure and a chain of several consecutive quests was a welcome relief instead of a boring grind.

… heading into [a dungeon] will prove to be an adventure in its own right.

Well, in a fantasy RPG that should be all about exciting adventure this is not a bad thing!

Last time I leveled a character from 1-60 on a pserver, I met two others (a couple) at the entrance to the Stockade; we chatted a bit and when the guy they were waiting for didn’t show up, we cleared the dungeon together, made an appointment for the next dungeon run a few days later; leveled together from time to time and they ended up in my guild and I played with them for months. Try that with LFG.

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Annoyed badger

No in classic, but to illustrate a point, in TBC, I remember my foot slog across the world to do my pally quests for the mighty verigans fist….literally all over the world….the footslog across ashenvale was particularly gruelling for a low level draenei….still, it was one of my most memorable wow memories… and I loved that weapon, it was not a drop, it was fucking earned, properly quested for and achieved.

So I suppose thats what it comes down to. There are compromises and benefits. I’m just not sure your modern gamer, conditioned to have a short attentionspan and immediate gratification would be willing to make that trade off anymore. I dont know, I’m just not sure. I may, and hope to be proven wrong.

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Carebear

perfectly said

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Hirku

No mention of monks or Pandaria in that list, so I’m out.

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Dreema

1. Slow combat is much better. These days, all I seem to do is madly spam buttons until the enemy drops dead. Combat in vanilla actually gives you time to breathe.

5. The world might be smaller but it’ll seem much larger. Zones will take longer to travel across – no mounts till 40, no flying mounts full stop, no portals – and you’ll spend much longer questing in them than you do now.

7. I prefer questing in vanilla to the tedious story-driven crap we have these days. I can run through vanilla questlines multiple times without growing bored, but run through a single questline in Legion more than once? No thanks. If I have to stand around waiting for another lousy cut-scene or long-winded NPC to ramble through their dialogue, I’ll scream.

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Schmidt.Capela

5. The world might be smaller but it’ll seem much larger. Zones will take longer to travel across – no mounts till 40, no flying mounts full stop, no portals – and you’ll spend much longer questing in them than you do now.

Which is the single reason I won’t bother with Classic. I remember perfectly well how boring travel was; back then I used a bot addon to travel for me (before Blizzard blocked addons from moving the character)

Heck, Cataclysm removing the town portals from Shattrath and Dalaran is part of the reason I’m not playing WoW anymore.

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Dreema

If you have to use addons to play the game for you, Classic probably isn’t for you anyway.

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Schmidt.Capela

Given that I develop and modify addons for my own use, in that regard Vanilla was actually better. It took some time for Blizzard to notice just how much of their API was open to modders and close the loopholes.

Heck, for a while I played WoW with a gamepad thanks to how addons in Vanilla allowed me to make a “do my rotation for me” button; I could then cram every control I needed in the few buttons available. I didn’t even need third party software to do that (the gamepad’s driver already had options to control the mouse and to map buttons to keypresses).

And that level of automation wasn’t even uncommon. Ever heard of the Decursive addon? Back then it would automatically select your target for you and use the appropriate spell to either remove whichever debuff was present or top the target’s health without wasting mana. People joked that with the correct set of addons a chicken could heal a raid, as it only required constantly pecking at a button.

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Ssiard

Yeah because of all that, I expect all of the modern UI to be there in the classic server.

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Dug From The Earth

1. Slow combat is much better. These days, all I seem to do is madly spam buttons until the enemy drops dead. Combat in vanilla actually gives you time to breathe.

Forget breathing…

I was actually able to get up and go make a sandwich on multiple occasions while fighting with my Paladin.

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Ssiard

I loved going to the crossroads and picking up 15 quests and then wandering around the barrens doing them all before heading back to town to turn them in!

Minimalistway
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Minimalistway

Slow combat is a good thing for me, at least some games should have it.

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MesaSage

Thanks for the heads up. No matter what it’s like I want to check it out. I might play for 5 minutes or 5 months or 5 years. Doesn’t matter, I’m just happy to be able to try it out.

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Bhagpuss Bhagpuss

That’s an interesting “Vanilla” Perfect Ten. I was very late to the WoW party: I missed the first five years. When I rolled my first character we were somewhere in the middle of the WotLK era.

A lot of the listed conditions still existed then.

Leveling was definitely slower. I can’t remember if the global cooldown was in effect but i do know I gave up playing a Priest after about 19 levels because just about all I did was auto-attack with a wand. Travel was definitely as described. I didn’t get a mount until I hit 40 or that’s how I remember it. My Hunter carried arrows and my Warlock carried shards. Inventory was very restrictive but I imagine it was worse before.

There were plenty of quests, though, and two more expansions-worth of zones. Still, I remember a LOT of farming for quest items and a LOT of repetitive questing. I preferred that to the current over-written version, actually.

The really surprising thing, though, is that I had finished my six-month run in WoW before the Dungeon Finder arrived. The whole time I was playing I had to go to the dungeon to get a group. I stayed on for a week longer than I had intended just to try this new-fangled Dungeon Finder thing and see how it went. I didn’t like it much – it certainly didn’t encourage me to hang around.

As someone who missed Vanilla completely I’m hoping they bring it back as close to possible exactly as it was on launch day. I suspect they will end up fudging it, though, and it won’t be sufficiently different to the current version to make it worthwhile hanging around for long.

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Loopy

Can confirm – all these will happen. For better or worse. As much as i am a “champion” of bringing classic WoW back, there have been many times where i yelled in frustration “are you f-ing serious right now?” when…:

1. … i accidentally aggro a mob that is 37 km away
2. … i get attacked by non-leashed mob that aggroed me 12 zones ago
3. … i repeatedly die after spending 30 mins fighting fast-spawning mobs in a cave, just to hit that one spot that makes the cave “explored”
4. … the graveyard is on the opposite side of the zone

etc. etc. And yet i loved every minute of it, and thoroughly enjoyed my time on private servers for the last couple of years. Again, not everything is rosy about vanilla WoW, and there are elements of it that are clearly old school by today’s standards. As much as you should be forewarned, i also advise going into it with an open mind because it’s a rewarding experience.

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Dug From The Earth

for me, those elements were more of a “I loved it the first time, but ill be damned if i ever want to go through that again” thing

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Theodrax

I remember running my starting human character from Ironforge to Menethil Harbor so I could take the boat across and join my wife’s Night Elf character. Must sneak carefully, because nearly everything could kill.

I don’t know if I want a full “classic” server. A happy medium. Something that slows down the leveling a bit, and de-emphasizes repeating the same instances over and over, but perhaps not the full pain of vanilla. I’m not sure where the line is though. It’s probably different for everybody.

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Annoyed badger

urrgh the harbor run……Oh shit, aggroed a fucking croc again….dead.

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zoward

Yeah, the damn druid aquatic form quest suicide run *shivers*. Can’t wait to do it again though.

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Dug From The Earth

It was fun when I didnt know any better.

Now the only thing i miss from classic is the world feeling populated.

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Video Game Professor

Ok, fair enough, and an honest list of what to expect that’s different, but I feel like I’m reading what would be the antecedent to a forthcoming “I told you so,” tone, in the negative. Outside of maybe the talent tree and the original zone comment, anyone mildly interested might just be turned off without some positive things to expect.

I dont actually think its talked about enough as to what makes classic appealing. Usually it’s something about nostalgia…

Progression will be slow. Each level is an achievement.

Playing everquest and wow, everytime somone leveled they yell “Ding!” In gchat, and the Congo Rats would be released. Can you imagine doing that 1-110 today? You’d get reported for spam. Now it happens only, maybe, when you finally hit 110 (you know, 10 hours later). What does that say about the actual purpose of leveling?

It feels like less of a world…and more of one.

Inventory pain is definitely a thing for some classess, but in other genres, like survival games, it’s a *feature* of the immersion. The travel times, the lack of quests, slower combat -almost turn based!- no group finder, is definitely a bummer today as the demographic aged out or currently exists as the instant gratification crowd, but it made the game feel like a more traditional RPG.

It was slower, but that forced you to do something else. Like chat with your party, guild, look around the world, admire your character, etc. We use voice chat almost exclusively in my group, warning those that want in to get in our group to hoin VOIP because we don’t always read gchat. By moving so quickly, with nearly no downtime, we’re racing. As a Pandaren once said, slow down!

All in all, the article is truthful, if not a little slanted. Ten Things You Need To Know If You Forgot Sylvanas Wore A Long Skirt or Ten Things To Darken Your Rosy Lenses might be a title in better direction.

Im suprised you didnt mention skilling up weapons. Have fun with that, non casters…

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MeltWithYou

No LFG/ Meeting Stone –

I still miss the days when you’d be out kill/collecting when a huge guild would be trotting down the path to whatever raid they were going to do…the shear fact you had to ride to some place to participate in whatever event really did make the world feel more alive, even if it took longer to do and was a pain to coordinate.

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Stiqman

So in other words, almost everything will be better.

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Nathan Aldana

perople who think that stuff is fun literally boggle my mind.

Its like the guy at work that brags about how much better a person he is because he enjoys hard labor.

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Michael18

It’s not about hard labor. See my comment above for an example of the benefits of the more slow-paced style of MMO.

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Wilhelm Arcturus

So no downside is what you’re saying?

I think you forgot grinding gold for hella expensive fast mounts at level 60… or, if you’re a warlock or paladin, having to quest for their special mounts… and still having to grind for the gold. Also, an extensive number of things you cannot do while mounted that won’t dismount you but will just pop the “you are mounted” error.

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Carebear

there is an addon for auto-dismount to fix this

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Geo Kavu

On the upside:
No flying mounts will mean that zones will not feel empty anymore.
World-pvp is a thing.
Blue gear is respectable and classes are specialized and have clear strengths/weaknesses (not everyone can stun, not everyone can escape, not everyone can heal).
Quests are hard and grouping up for leveling is a thing (which comes hand-in-hand with meeting new people)
Max-level characters are rare and epic-wearing characters are be known by name.

Vanilla is more about the journey to the max level. Not the end-game.
When was the last time you entered a 20-100 battleground and enjoyed it?
Or felt a true sense of achievement when finishing a normal dungeon?

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Dug From The Earth

Quests were never hard. Quests were simply “unknown”. There was no “wowhead” telling you where to go or how to do things. You had to figure it out yourself.

Im willing to bet that the majority of people who will be playing classic, will be WoW vets.. which means they will remember all the quests, and have zero issues or challenge getting through that content.

Dungeons wont be harder. Sure, they might take longer, but again, players know all the mechanics already. Those players who are begging for classic servers, are the same players who know how to Sheep/CC mobs in a dungeon properly already. The same players who understand LoS pulling, and how to assist on the tank.

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Ssiard

No wowhead but thottbot was there on release with all the info you need for quests. wowhead simply replaced it.

I remember very little from quests or the dungeons from 13 years ago.

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Dug From The Earth

I remember very little from quests or the dungeons from 13 years ago.

here is a refresher

Quest Giver Goofy Farmer,

“These bears have been eating all my sheep. Go kill 10 of them for me and bring me their bare asses as proof. Get it? Now get going!”
——–
Rewards:
Sheep Skin Cloak
+8 Spirit
+5 cold resist

——–
Thotbot comments:

1. Why do some of these bears not have asses? Ive killed like 50 of them and I still dont have the 10 I need

2. I think if you hunt the ones near the river, the drop rate is higher, but I cant be sure

3. Ive just been camping the same 3 bears near the mage tower, they seem to have the highest drop rate. Ive got 7 of the 10 i need so far, will be back tomorrow to get the rest.

5. You might need skinning to get the asses. Gonna take me a few days to get my skill high enough to skin the bears, since they are level 15. Ill let you know what I find out.

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Ukrutor

Murloc brains… murloc brains…. they still haunt me in my dreams.

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Ssiard

Right but they also had the loc of Mankirks wife!

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Schmidt.Capela

Quests were never hard. Quests were simply “unknown”. There was no “wowhead” telling you where to go or how to do things. You had to figure it out yourself.

Depends on whether you are talking about just-after-release Vanilla or a-year-after-release Vanilla. The game was released in late 2004; by the end of 2005 there were already quite extensive resources pointing players to every single quest, and providing the solutions to every one that wasn’t obvious, as well as multiple guides, both free and paid, for how to most effectively level up.

BTW, Thottbot became a searchable WoW database back when WoW was still in Beta, and was already an useful (if spotty) resource when WoW launched.

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Dug From The Earth

For those that knew of of it. The concept of using an external source to do in game activities, was still a pretty obscure concept for many gamers.

I remember how against using a website my fiancee was, she preferred there be a prima guide, which was pretty awful at the time.

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Schmidt.Capela

The external resources were nevertheless out there and were useful, even if a much smaller number of players made use of them. By the time WoW was first released popular games already had all their secrets exposed online by a legion of fans in a matter of days or weeks, and WoW was no exception, so WoW players were never required to go in blind and figure everything out themselves. Or at least not for long.

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Schmidt.Capela

Quests are hard and grouping up for leveling is a thing (which comes hand-in-hand with meeting new people)

All non-dungeon quests were soloable at the recommended level, even the Elite ones (though those required more time, skill, and perhaps a proper soloing build). I should know, I did most of them solo. And from launch the most effective way to level was by playing solo, unless you had a fixed group that could be assembled for the group content without any time wasted to travel, waiting people to log in, or people going AFK due to the real world; leveling by doing dungeons only became feasible for most players after LFD was added in WotLK.

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Ashfyn Ninegold

I beg to differ. It highly depended on your class. Some quests in the Wetlands were very difficult to solo, unless there were a lot of other people killing mobs as well.

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Geo Kavu

Did you happen to be playing hunter or warlock?
Roll a rogue, a priest or a druid. See how soloable the quests are.
Priests literally level by putting a shield on themselves, one dot on the enemy mob and auto-hitting with the wand.
Melee classes could have their auto-attacks AND their skills dodged/parried/blocked/missed/glanced.
Escape skills like Sprint or Evasion had 10 mins cooldown instead of the 3 they have now.
And about evading mobs when travelling.. Good luck with them running faster than you, having about triple the aggro range of what you see today and a 100% daze when hitting from behind.

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Bhagpuss Bhagpuss

The point of “soloability” that’s always missed is that it applies to the player’s ability to solo the content, not the character’s. Most complaints about early MMOs lacking solo content relate to that content not being soloable equally by all classes. It was always soloable equally by all players (skill notwithstanding) – you just had to roll a class the developers intended to be able to solo it.

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Bryan Correll

you just had to roll a class the developers intended to be able to solo it

Soloing was certainly faster with certain classes, but I had max-level characters in all Horde-available classes (so no Paladin) and almost all leveling was solo.

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Schmidt.Capela

As long as a good solo build was used soloing was faster for all classes. Including Paladins, of which I had first hand experience.

The only potential exception was if the player had a dedicated group that always played together, thus removing the wait for assembling the group and getting everyone to where they would level; in that case leveling in a group was better. But for the average player that had to waste time assembling a group, and then waste even more time getting everyone together, to then play for a while until someone had to leave, grouping actually slowed down leveling a fair amount.

Modern WoW is much better at allowing players to level by playing (instanced) group content, just queue for it and do solo quests until the queue pops.

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Ashfyn Ninegold

Yup. A hunter.

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Schmidt.Capela

My main was a paladin, my second most played character a druid, though I had characters of every race and class; I would be making quite a few characters anyway because I didn’t want to ever depend on other players, so I had characters covering every single profession, I just made each of those characters be of a different race and class.

@Ashfyn
Yeah, Wetlands Elites were a pain in the ass, because they often had some kind of rejuvenation power. Still doable, it just took a very long time to down each of them.

Also, I’m not arguing that all quests were easy to solo, but that they were possible, if challenging. Which is they way I prefer them; if I’m guaranteed to never lose, to never be killed, the game is boring. Part of the reason I would do Elite quests solo, doing them in a group mostly eliminated the risk of death.

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thalendor

While I would be happy to forgo #10, many of these are things I am looking forward to. Especially things that slow the game down a bit. Longer time to kill, slower level, tougher encounters? I like it. Let’s add in meaningful crowd control once again as #11 on the list. The only downside, the one thing that will keep me from playing on Classic servers for the long term is that this is all stuff I’ve done before, up to and including clearing Naxx40. About the only thing I didn’t do was getting to the highest PvP ranks but, frankly, PvP isn’t and never really was my thing.

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Rees Racer

As this was my first experience with an MMO, I will likely have a go. As tempting as it might be to go full nostalgia, I very likely will NOT roll a male Night Elf Druid as my first character.

Oh, and maybe there should be:
11. Long server queues (even if Blizzard makes them artificially).

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squidgod2000

So is WoW Classic going to be legit classic, or EQ1’s kinda-classic-but-not-really-because-servers-and-stuff?

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Wanda Clamshuckr

Adding a classic server option “is a larger endeavor than you might imagine, but we’re committed to making an authentic Blizzard-quality classic experience,” Brack says.

“We want to reproduce the game experience that we all enjoyed from the original classic WoW. Not the actual launch experience,” he jokes. “So, please bear with us. It’s going to take some time. but it will happen.”

They are still working out the particulars, so we’ll see as it rolls out.

source

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Schmidt.Capela

I’m not sure what you mean by kinda-classic, but Blizzard will have to update the server and client at least to allow them to use the current billing and login systems, as well as the current server virtualization system. This doesn’t require changing any of the experience after the login screen, though.

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squidgod2000

EQ1’s classic/progression servers aren’t true to era due to their need to share a client and backend functionality with the current game. As a result, EQ1’s classic servers are far, far easier than classic actually was (some thing can’t be changed for classic servers without affecting current servers).
I imagine that WoW Classic will use the current interface and graphics and the like, but I wonder where they’ll draw the line.

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CMDR Crow

This list makes my heart go pitter-patter.

I can’t wait.

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MrNude

I actually filled my ignore list on every horde toon I ever made because of #10. Not sure I’m commiting yet, but I would like another go. We’ll have to see what they come up with. Love to have a Dwarf Priest be a thing again.

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