Crowfall delays soft launch until 2018

A lot of things have changed for Crowfall over the past year, several of them being pretty darn significant. Decoupling races and classes alone was a pretty big deal. So it probably comes as no huge surprise that the game is officially not going to be ready for a soft launch by the end of the year. Instead, the game is setting its sights on a soft launch at some point in 2018, with no hard dates provided beyond that.

The letter announcing the delay notes that this puts the game a year out from its originally intended launch date, noting that the target dates were optimistic and hoping that fans are mollified by the progress that has been made. It also promises that the team is going to be hard at work finishing up the features needed to reach a soft launch state, as the goal is for as early in 2018 as possible. Time will tell how early that turns out to be.

SHARE THIS ARTICLE
Code of Conduct | Edit Your Profile | Commenting FAQ | Badge Reclamation | Badge Key

LEAVE A COMMENT

15 Comments on "Crowfall delays soft launch until 2018"

Subscribe to:
Sort by:   newest | oldest | most liked
Reader
Alex Malone

Uggh, what the fuck do they mean by “soft launch”? Such an irritating term!

You either launch it, or you don’t. If you haven’t launched your game, then it’s still in testing. If you want to charge people to test your game, crack on, just be fucking honest about it!

Celestia
Reader
Loyal Patron
Kickstarter Donor
Celestia

MMORPG posters angry at game’s release delay.
MMORPG posters angry at game’s buggy release.

Crowfall devs can’t win. Glad they’re delaying if it means having a play ready game.

cryinglightning39
Reader
cryinglightning39

I m ready to roll my guinea pig as soon as hard launch is ready. I don’t like soft things, besides Guineas.

Reader
Arktouros

This is 50% of the reason I haven’t bought into Crowfall or any other title like this yet. All these crowd funded, early access MMOs are like this now where they just endlessly push back betas and launch “for the sake of the game” with zero consideration on the sake of the player.

The other reason is simply I have no context of what I’m buying or it’s value in it’s cash shop. Everything seems ala carte but I have no frame of reference for value. Like I can buy a “parcel” of land for $15 or $25 etc but what does that represent? I mean I know what I can do with it, but how long does that take me in game to make if I were to make my own $25 parcel via in game means? 1 hour of grinding materials? 25 hours of grinding materials? More importantly however if they don’t know that answer, or if that answer is still changing because it’s early alpha, then how did they derive the $25 number? Whole thing seems fucky to me which is a shame cause I could use a new game right about now.

Reader
Loyal Patron
Armsbend

What’s the other 50%?

edit: woops I saw “the other reason” just now. I assume that is the other 50%.

I really wish the ‘edit’ feature here had the ability to delete a post.

Reader
Kickstarter Donor
Patreon Donor
Loyal Patron
Ashfyn Ninegold

Anyone who’s kickstarted a game that’s a year passed its original schedule has a right to be concerned. On the other hand, how many games launched not ready for primetime and sunk into irrelevance? Gamers today are rarely forgiving. If the game is worth playing, kickstarters should want it to launch as close to perfect as it can reasonably get to improve its chances of success. Otherwise, oblivion.

Reader
Arktouros

Fundamentally I agree, however at the same time jerking players around with elongated alpha/betas is equally damaging to the product long term. I played Albion Online for hundreds of hours by the time it launched to the point it was just too boring by the time it actually released. Consider a content oriented game like ESO and the ability for players to just consume all that content before launch comes out would you even need to play if you had already experienced the full game?

Alfredo Garcia
Reader
Loyal Patron
Patreon Donor
Kickstarter Donor
Alfredo Garcia

It doesn’t help that what launched as Albion Online ended up pretty different, and perhaps fundamentally boring, compared to much of what was in the previous development stages.

*The word for today must be “fundamentally”.

tinnis_
Reader
tinnis_

Yea, contexualising the store offerings is difficult due to limited information about the loop between the Eternal Kingdoms [player housing/trading areas – where store items can be used] and the Campaign worlds – where fighting etc happens and buildings are reclaimed from ruins or built from scratch only using in game resources. You can also build ‘store’ items in an EK using in game resources too: but not really presented how much effort and time such things would take to do.

They have made some statements about how there pricing is determined anyway

e.g. FOUNDERS UPDATE: GUILD STRONGHOLDS

[link]

or dev statemetns on the forum [link]

“A few people will buy them, but not many. A handful of guilds, maybe.

Mostly, they’ll be crafted, which makes the numbers theoretical. When an eve battle results in “$150,000 worth of ships destroyed!” that is technically true, but most of it is virtual money. Do some people spend that kind of money? yes, but it’s exceedingly rare.

These are the biggest, most impressive strongholds in the game. If we want it to take a long time to build one (even for a large guild) then the resource cost has to be extreme. Multiply that out into theoretical dollars, and it’s big numbers. “

Reader
Arktouros

Well I know from what they said you can craft everything you see in the cash shop (even parcels) for the most part (not mount cosmetics for example). So selling you a Fort is selling you the materials, crafting skill, etc which basically just amounts to the universal currency of Time. But what they don’t seem to indicate is how much time that actually represents which starts getting very questionable.

The part where they’ve talked about their pricing structure is more of a justification of high pricing. So a parcel(s) of land that supports 1000 people being $5000 isn’t bad because it’s $5 per person. HOWEVER that fundamentally doesn’t answer the question how they came about the $5 number and what time that $5 number represents in game. It addresses the sticker-shock of their high priced items but it doesn’t address the core level issue of what it’s worth. If 1000 people all contributed an equal amount of items to that Parcel would it take them 5 hours of grinding materials? 10 hours? 100 hours?

And with them tweaking the items and systems so much, for example they just recently overhauled their harvesting system, the truth is it’s unlikely they even know that answer. That goes back to questioning how they arrived at $$$ in the first place and whether or not the game system will be designed to make that $$$ value better for the player (IE: Harsher system requiring more manual effort) or an actually balanced system?

Again, just kinda fucky.

borghive
Reader
borghive

I wonder if any of these kickstarter MMOs will ever see an actual release?

Reader
Peter Couse

I wonder that to, but I certainly hope so. These guys at least seem to be doing it the right way as far as seeming honest about their intent to put out a good game.

Otherwise we are stuck with AAA psychological ‘hold on to your wallet’ games or one, maybe two in the future, mega kickstarters who are just barely less iffy than the little guys.

Besides, generally speaking, innovation usually is inspired by the little guys who don’t have the time to follow trends, so I’m rooting for them.

Reader
Sally Bowls

mega kickstarters who are just barely less iffy than the little guys.

I originally misread this as you making the point that as KS get larger and larger, our skepticism of their monetization approaches AAA.

Reader
mttgamer

Yeahhh…. I booted the game up this week and it’s no where near ready for prime time….

Reader
socontrariwise

What is missing or buggy?

wpDiscuz