Massively OP Podcast Episode 145: Farewell Marvel Heroes and Master X Master

On this week’s show, Justin and Bree bid a sad farewell to Marvel Heroes (and Master X Master while we’re at it). It’s not all depressing news; Secret World Legends is killing it, there’s a new Path of Exile expansion, and Guild Wars 2’s fourth living world season is on its way.

It’s the Massively OP Podcast, an action-packed hour of news, tales, opinions, and gamer emails! And remember, if you’d like to send in your own letter to the show, use the “Tips” button in the top-right corner of the site to do so.

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15 Comments on "Massively OP Podcast Episode 145: Farewell Marvel Heroes and Master X Master"

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Tanek

The entire first 20 minutes of this one should have a spoiler tag. :P

Reader
donvweel

You deserve a medal Justin for completing Proof is in the Poison. It is one of the most greuling quests in DDO. I made it through once I think, but I avoid that one like the plague. I think that one and The Pit are two of the most avoided.

Reader
sophiskiai

“Choose Your Own” is one of my all-time favourite quests in SWL, and the fact that it was written so late in TSW’s lifespan gives me hope that new SWL content will continue the fantastic writing quality of the base game.

But while I do like all the QoL changes SWL brought in this week, most of it feels like stuff which really should’ve been in at launch or soon after! And while I’m glad Funcom had good revenue from SWL’s launch, I’ll be interested to see how well that holds up a couple of quarters down the line…

Minimalistway
Reader
Minimalistway

Game design for me is so interesting, trying to understand how a game works is good part of having fun while playing it, that’s why i ask not-so-simple-question, it is a topic i wish more people talk and write about it.

Thank you for the answer, and i should say i don’t enjoy looting mobs one by one, this is tedious :-) .. so yeah, the question is how to make slowing down fun.

Xijit
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Kickstarter Donor
Xijit

for the life of me I can not understand why Marvel didn’t buy out the game and then dump the studio.

amkosh
Reader
amkosh

Disney has been steadily going away from handling games themselves. They tend to license out their stuff to publishers. Why they didn’t move the property probably had something to do with who owned the actual systems than anything else. Also Disney is very risk adverse, and it is a serious risk to keep the game when its encumbered by controversy of that nature. Now they can say, pretty much when they knew, they severed the link.

Also, Disney doesn’t really *need* games. They pretty much print money and a lot of it with every Marvel and Star Wars movie. A few hundred K of revenue from a game isn’t going to really move their numbers much.

While it sucks to be a player, it pretty much is explainable.

Reader
Duane Does not check email

The numbers were not good. In 3-5 years launch a new game with new tech.

Reader
Loyal Patron
Armsbend

For Disney the amount of money an old game that barely anyone played wouldn’t have ever registered. What would be the upside? Keeping a good brand image among 2000 people? That would have been worth finding a new studio, maintaining the servers and developing.

Xijit
Reader
Kickstarter Donor
Xijit

Seemed like more that that were playing it, on mutiple platforms, and were buying pretty freely from the cash shop … On top of which it was doing good as an internal marketing platform for Marvel to promote their new movies and comic book events.

Reader
Loyal Patron
Armsbend

I’d say the closing would scream otherwise. If it were making lots of money they would have found a way.

amkosh
Reader
amkosh

I don’t really think so. Once their CEO was accused of sexual issues with his employees, it was all done. Disney’s acting like a media company here.

Reader
Sray

Good show. Reminded me that I don’t listen often enough.

I noticed that at the end of the podcast Justin corrected himself a few times when referring to older games as “harder”, as opposed to time consuming. I think there is an interesting conversation that could -and should- be had around what we’re talking about when we talk about difficulty in video games. Personally, when I refer to difficulty, I’m talking about difficulty of execution: both the consumption of time and/or complexity of the meta don’t factor into my assessment. Yet, I can clearly see that for many gamers -whether in MMOs or other genres- difficulty is purely a question of time consumption or of the complexity of the meta, and the “actually getting it done” does not factor into their equation. So, I think it would be great to hear some thoughts on that.

Reader
sophiskiai

I’m not sure how easy it is to draw a line between “difficulty of execution” and “time consumption”, since in many cases difficulty of execution is something that can be solved by lots of practice?

Reader
Sray

It feels like it’s pretty simple to me. Difficulty of execution does not preclude time needed to learn, but there’s a gigantic difference between it taking time to learn the exact timing to dodge an incoming attack, or how to aim your weapon for precision hits while moving; and waiting twenty minutes for a ferry, or needing three minutes to recharge your health bar after every fight. Difficulty of execution doesn’t mean that things don’t take time; but consuming time doesn’t necessarily mean anything other than making a player wait in order to keep them from doing what they want to be doing.

The execution difficulty of most MMOs has risen dramatically over the last six or seven years as they’ve become faster, and more twitch based; while at the same time we’ve seen huge reductions in time sinks, and complex meta building. We regularly see guys talking about “how easy games are today” because your character gets a mount at level 15 instead of level 30 or 40, or because of expanded inventory options; but at the same time, combat is far faster, and generally has dramatically increased the number of moving parts (group based boss fights in particular). You might not have to spend hours getting your group ready for a night’s adventuring anymore; but you are also equally more likely to be dependent on everyone in the group having precise timing and perfect positioning in order to make your night’s adventures a success.

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