The Daily Grind: What MMO has the brightest future looking into 2018?

One of the most popular annual roundups we do is on the healthiest MMORPGs in the genre, both because it reminds us that the genre really does boast a pretty deep bench and because it brings no end of commenters pointing out the games that didn’t make the top 10 – which actually means the bench is even deeper than that.

And now here we are at the beginning of another year, wondering which one is the absolutely healthiest – and whether that prognosis has changed since last year. What do you think: Which MMORPG is most likely to keep on landing on the “healthiest” list for years and years to come? Is it the obvious answer or have the tides finally turned? Which MMORPG has the brightest future looking into 2018?

Every morning, the Massively Overpowered writers team up with mascot Mo to ask MMORPG players pointed questions about the massively multiplayer online roleplaying genre. Grab a mug of your preferred beverage and take a stab at answering the question posed in today’s Daily Grind!
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69 Comments on "The Daily Grind: What MMO has the brightest future looking into 2018?"

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Chronic Enigma

I think Star Citizen could be a break away hit. So many naysayers everywhere, but what I’m playing I’m enjoying, and I’m excited for these quarterly patches. Honestly though Star Citizen is most likely a Summer 2019 release.

I think a lot of the Free to Play games that are already doing well will do even better this year. There will be some trimming of the fat on the ones that are barely staying afloat. I do think that there will be quite a bit of closures and pay models changed. FFXIV I think will continue to stay strong, I’m actually going to re sub and buy Storm Blood and check the content from 3.0 to 4.0

2018 will be interesting.

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Alex Malone

WoW and ESO will probably remain the “brightest” MMOs of 2018, i.e. they’ll both have significant content updates, retain lots of players and make the news.

I feel FFXIV is now on it’s downwards curve. It did well compared to most modern releases and seems to still be a good game, but it seems to be passed the point where it can reliably attract new players.

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Knight Porter

FFXIV is at record subscriber numbers with Stormblood, and isn’t it only second to the ever-reigning juggernaut WoW in terms of active paid subscribers?

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Tithian

I jumped into ESO recently, and the starting zones are packed. Yes, I know that the content scales, but most people I meet are generally on the lower end of the levelling process, and you bump into players even in the most remote public dungeons.

That’s the hallmark of a healthy online game, right there.

Estranged
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Estranged

The only answer is WoW. They have the customers and the money. Simple.

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jay

Just talking community activity and health, I would say GW2, BDO, ESO, WoW, and FFXIV would be top of anyone’s list. Aion, LotRO, Rift, etc all have somewhat healthy communities going forward, but nothing even close to what the big 5 have.

This simple metric kind of gives a good indication of the overall outlook for a game in the coming year. The more people playing, and the healthier the community, the more money that is taken in for the studio. ie. more funding for the game’s future.

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Veldan

It depends so much on where you are though. For example, Aion is probably a lot more active in Asia, and RIFT’s US community has definitely aged better than it’s EU counterpart.

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Dug From The Earth

The things that led the pack last year, I believe will continue to lead for at least a good part of 2018. Things like PUBG.

Id like to see more mmoRPGS on this list, but the offerings for that genre just havent been on par with many players expectations.

hamblepants
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hamblepants

(EDITED for shortness) This isn’t a direct answer, but:

Aren’t there more people playing MMO’s* than ever before?

I understand that for people looking for rich virtual worlds with more mechanics-based/rule-bound content and less scripted content (sandbox-y?), there maybe aren’t as many options.

Or for people looking to have a particular itch scratched (I’m one of these, myself), there aren’t MMO’s out there currently that scratch it.

But if there are more people playing MMO’s these days than ever before, how can people think that the *entire genre* (i.e. not just their preferred type of game) is at anything other than a high point?

*English speaking ones, that aren’t MOBAs or lobby shooters – actual MMO’s.

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Alex Malone

It really depends on what definition of MMO you use and what metrics you use to assess the health. Assuming you are using the proper definition of an MMO (a game that supports a massive number of players within the same virtual environment):

Total number of MMOs? Sure, we’re at an all time high.

Total Revenue? We don’t have the data, but I expect this is also an all time high.

Revenue per MMO? Again, we don’t have the data, but I suspect this is slipping slightly.

Total Number of Players? We don’t have the data. My expectation is that this pretty much peaked 2010ish and has plateaued or slightly risen since then.

Retention? This is at an all time low, based on the small amount of data released by developers.

Quality? Totally subjective. We know players aren’t enjoying MMOs for very long which indicates a drop in quality, and we know players aren’t willing to spend money on many MMOs which also indicates a drop in quality.

Upcoming MMOs? This is at an all time low. AAA developers have pretty much stopped making new MMOs, indicating their lack of faith in the genre. There is very little to look forwards to outside of the indie market, a market that is very fickle and usually produces garbage. This is probably the biggest indication that the genre is in serious trouble.

The hardest thing is that the only company that publishes their research data is SuperData, and they don’t know what an MMO is and they only collect data on less than 1% of the games industry. It is developer engagement that is the most telling indication of the health of the genre. AAA companies have massive research and marketing teams available to them and spend tons of money researching the industry before committing to new projects. They have pretty much unanimously declared that the genre is not worth investing in, so have switched to other genres entirely. The only AAA dev in the west making an MMO (that we know about) is Amazon and I highly doubt that it’ll be an actual MMO.

Polyanna
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Polyanna

This is a fair point, and one people tend to forget. By any reliable estimate there are more active actual MMORPGs on the market today, and more players playing them, probably by a couple orders of magnitude, than there ever were in the supposed golden age of the genre.

The mere existence of this website, which is able to operate as a going concern solely by covering this niche of a niche in the current consumer electronic marketplace, is testament to your hunch that the genre is, if anything, at an historical high point, not an all time low.

What I think people mean when they speak of a low point is a drought of ambitious, exciting, big budget titles that follow the classic big tent or “virtual world” model of MMORPG design, where developers tried to create a game that all sorts of players could do all sorts of things in (i.e., PLAY at many different ROLES within), all together, all the time, online.

I’m not sure even that brand of pessimism is well-founded though, because I think a lot of it is based on worry (or jealousy) when people see new types of games like battle royale shooters or survival sandbox sims sucking up so much player base so fast that it seems like they’re the only thing anyone is playing any more. But I’m not convinced that any significant part of the players who are into PUBG (Fortnite, H1Z1, ARK, etc.) right now would be playing a classic MMORPG if those games didn’t exist.

They probably would be playing something else, and probably were before PUBG came along. But it’s much more likely that something else would be (or was) COD or CS:GO . . . maybe Borderlands. Those games scratch an itch for a lot of people, but it’s not an itch that can be scratched, or should be, by MMORPGs as we know them. And MMORPGs aren’t “losing” players to those games; many of these are players who just don’t play MMORPGs, and probably never will (or never did).

And yet, even with so much attention and money going to these games that aren’t MMORPGs at all, we still have three real, actual, true “AAA” MMORPGs in the top several tiers of Steam’s 2017 list of best sellers by gross revenue; with ESO leading the pack in the “gold” tier.

Besides those live games that are doing quite well (along with the majors that aren’t on Steam like WoW and GW2), there also are a number of games in development right now, some with fantastically high budget commitments, that are striving quite conspicuously to get back to the basics of building real live virtual worlds that are massively multiplayer, with rich, open-ended, player-driven story line content.

Not all those games will succeed. Some will stumble. Some may fail. But there are games out there, and coming “soon” that do those things people say they want so much, or at least try to. And even if you can’t find a game right now, today, that does everything you want, you can’t deny that there are far more choices out there that may do some of what you want, and some of them do it really, really well.

semugh
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semugh

there won’t be another WOW which by definition means the MMO genre has plateaued. In other words it’s declining. Others call this dying.
MOP covers PUBG, tomorrow they will cover Don’t starve together lol…
Anyways the MMO genre had a good run, can’t wait for UO going f2p giving a closure to the genre.
WOW as an oldguard plus eastern devs who just love the term MMORPG will keep the lights on for this genre. But in the west it’s a dying breed.

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Doctor Sweers

We have more options available today with gaming than we did when WOW first hit the market. For me, I once looked for only one MMO to play. SWG was my one MMO for a while. Now, I play several MMO’s each week. Either my attention span has diminished or there are just too many options (none of which seem to check off all the boxes I look for in an MMO).

I have a hard time agreeing that the genre is dying off when games such as Star Citizen, Camelot Unchained, Ashes of Creation, etc. continue to bring in large sums of money even before the masses have had an opportunity to play the game.

Rather than having 10 options to play, we now have a handful of really good MMO’s and then 50 additional MMO’s that have spread the MMO genre players thin. I think what we are really missing is that one great MMO that everyone wants to play.

One last thought: Many gamers today are looking to be the first to finish a game or hit end game content. Once they’ve hit the end game, they move on to the next game. Old school gamers such as myself stay in the slow lane and enjoy the game rather than rush through everything. By the time I get to end game content, much of the population has moved on to the next game.

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Schmidt.Capela

The effect this has caused on me is that I’m way more picky; when I have dozens of online games to switch to (and hundreds of offline games in my backlog), it becomes easy to leave MMOs over minor grievances.

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Serrenity

there won’t be another WOW

Disagree – this is really narrow thinking. A new game will come along that will explode the genre again. Will the genre look the same as it does now? Of course not, nor do we want it to. But our genre was the forerunner for … so much of what even single player games are today — and of course its changing, but it’s far from dying. I don’t think the MMO genre CAN die at this point — so much of our existence is lived online and in a massive-mutliplayer setting.

The tech that created WoW is in the terms of software development – ancient. We have networking, graphical, systems technology available today that wasn’t even dreamed of when WoW was being birthed. Just wait until chatbots work their way into games as pseudo-Turing passing NPCs with better decision making capabilities than a significant portion of the US citizenry. When things like SpatialOS allow for decentralized worlds, Lumberyard becomes the defacto way to create virtual worlds — when the cost of developing them doesn’t necessitate not eating for weeks or a AAA budget.

The moral of the story here is — there are centuries more exploration in the MMO genre still to be completed — the best is not behind us. The best is yet to come, and like I said, the genre won’t look like it does today and that’s OK.

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Jerry

Warframe was by far my favorite multi-player game of 2017. Their open world expansion really added to the game.Division was tops in the smaller co-op space. I supported Camelot Unchained and Ashes of Creation 1st for PVP and the 2nd for PVE.

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Jon Wax

doesn’t matter. gaming has gone mainstream. mainstreaming ruins anything good. ergo… whatever game has a bright future will be diminished to burnt ruins by the incompetent masses and their petulant inability to handle anything remotely challenging. at least RDR2 is out this year so the whole thing isn’t a total loss. and thank god for Media Molecule putting out Dreams.

the best you can look forward to is someone comes up with something to replace “rekt” and “kek”. that’s literally all this community is good for now. First person memeing.

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Utakata

Can’t really say any at this point. Sure there are up coming stuff I can get behind. New races for WoW, Lyn Gunners in B&S…to name a few or two. But what is exciting to me, does not equate a healthy prosperous future to any given MMO. /shrug

butterpanda888
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butterpanda888

WoW and ESO as well as a good number of new games that I pray launch this year.
New games that should have a bright future include Crowfall, Sea of Thieves, and Bless to name a few. Whenever Moonlight Blade and Project TL come out those should be good too.

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Toy Clown

ESO, WoW, FFXIV, GW2, BDO.

In the sub models, WoW and FFXIV, both are surprisingly healthy. They both deliver content and what I love about them both is neither has an in-your-face cash shop. Just sadly the graphic style isn’t to my taste on either MMO.

ESO has done well for itself, which is evident in the content it’s producing and the playerbase coming across as largely content (if that’s even possible for an MMO, but there’s less whining from this quadrant of the internet sphere for sure).

GW2 has also done well for itself. It’s really driven the content out there. (I just really dislike how in-your-face their cash shop stuff has gotten.)

BDO has also been on top of the content heap, delivering content for 3 regional areas and is constantly updating the game, polishing and bug-fixing. The future looks bright, IMO, as they’re moving toward grouping content with the release of the upcoming dragon lands.

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Dug From The Earth

Would be nice to have some newer additions to that list at this point. Not that those other games are bad (they arent)… Im just tired of having to go back to older games, because the selection of newer games is slim to awful.

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life_isnt_just_dank_memes

I think those are really the standard bearers right now in the west. Runescape always gets forgotten but they ain’t going anywhere.

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Arktouros

BDO recently had a celebration in KR for having a new record of concurrent users. It’s consistently been in the top steam sales numbers for a long time which other MMOs also released on Steam haven’t come close. It’s pretty much just crushing it despite the usual gloom and doom predictions of dead after a month after it’s steam release.

There’s already a lot of new content planned coming not only locally here in NA/EU but also in KR. In KR we’ll see the release of the Lahn awakening (new class released for free) as well as the new Dreagan expansion (for free) which will feature more group content (to address the complaints we had about the game being solo all the time) with dragon hunting and the like. There will like be more content and updates coming in the later half of the year for them. In NA/EU we’ll see the above content later in 2018 but coming up soon we’ll likely see the “JIN” or “Absolute” skill versions for base classes which will add a new avenue for character progression.

All around a strong year of content updates coming up and continuing with BDO as it’s been since the launch of the game nearly two years ago.

Polyanna
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Polyanna

WoW. Legion has proven that Blizzard knows how to do expansions right, when they put their minds to it. We reasonably can expect BFA to deliver more of the same, and a little bit better, as Blizzard is the undisputed king of finding a formula and iterating on it.

Also, regardless of how it works out in the end, WoW Classic is going to be a big deal for the entire industry. It will be the biggest experiment in legacy servers to date, just because it’s an experiment by the industry’s biggest player. It’s also going to be the most dramatic, being a 100% rewind to an incarnation of a hugely played and dearly loved game that millions of people played and thought they would never get to play again.

Whether it lands with a thud or turns into a ringing success, Classic will be a closely watched lesson on the meaning and impact of words like “progression” and “challenge” and “community,” and the inherent value they hold for every game in this segment, old or new.

Blizzard always had the means to do WoW Classic well, and now they have the will. What they do with it will affect how games are made in this market for the next decade, the same as WoW in all its other forms has affected games for the last decade. It will be interesting to watch the industry watch what happens with it, and see what they learn from it.

Whether or not WoW has the “brightest” future, it certainly has the biggest; it is, after all, by any reasonable estimation, still the biggest MMO around, and will remain so for some time to come. It will be even bigger with the new expansion this year, and maybe bigger than any of us can guess right now with Classic coming after that.

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starbuck1771

World of Warcraft! It will remain at the head of the pack and many will return for the vanilla servers and expansion. To bad MOP will not have the guts to stream it. :P

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David Goodman

Well, everything that was doing financially well in 2017 will continue to do so in 2018. WoW, ESO, FFIV, etc.

I’m not going to list just a single MMO because, honestly, I don’t keep up with them in enough detail. I don’t have the time to play all the games I want, let alone rate them with any kind of accuracy.

I figure if a game is still releasing content at all, it’s doing well enough / bright enough (both from a business-financial POV and from a player-content one)

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Melissa McDonald

BDO/FF/ESO seem to be the healthiest from what I can see.

pepperzine
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pepperzine

As for the genre as a whole, I’m not really sure and don’t think I have enough information to make accurate predictions besides that I’m certain WoW will do just fine. I do also think ESO is going to port to PS VR like was done with Skyrim, and if that occurs, I predict they’ll have an extremely bright future in 2018 as well as the first MMORPG (or in line to be) on console VR.

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A Dad Supreme

Given what passes for an “MMO” these days and what’s covered here and elsewhere in the space-
PUBG.

I don’t believe it has even officially launched yet and is already competing (and winning?) against Overwatch. Anytime a game can do that and at the same time slap “Game is unfinished and is only and is a work in progress” on national prime time television spots while selling it has a bright future.

I don’t think any of the games I considered a traditional MMO has a ‘bright future’. There isn’t an upside to those types of games anymore.

They almost always start out with a selectively smaller base to begin with that ends up shrinking and growing ever smaller and some other weak variant of itself after just a few short years, before the inevitable decline to F2P/full cash shop status.

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Serrenity

re: PUBG – I haven’t decided if it’s legit or just the gaming-locusts game du jour. Something about it reminds me of Rovie / Angry Birds – was a HUGE deal for a while and then … everyone stopped caring.

I have no desire to play it honestly and I don’t care if its exists or not, it just strikes me as the flavor of the week as opposed to legitimate staying power.

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Robert Mann

No clue. I do know, however, that there isn’t much future in derivative and bland games with no innovation to them, or minimal excuses for innovation, and especially not if they go full stupid nickel and dime!

I feel like the bubble is finally dying, and we can get back to having some visionary work done toward virtual worlds that feel like worlds, rather than just a background to have some version of combat on.

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Schmidt.Capela

Is WoW still the main money-earner for Blizzard?

Because if it isn’t, then it might make more sense for Blizzard to direct resources that would usually go to improving WoW somewhere else, where they could bring a larger return on the investment. Not that Blizzard would close down WoW; it’s still too important. But the days of WoW having the first pick for Blizzard resources and the lion’s share of the development budget might be ending, if they aren’t already over.

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starbuck1771

WoW is still their big earner. It brings in billions yearly.

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Sally Bowls

IIRC, back when we were getting numbers, it was the largest but no longer the majority of Blizzard revenue. Perhaps OW is larger now.

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starbuck1771

Sally WoW is still their big earner. It has a steady stream of funds while Overwatch doesn’t. WoW brings in st least a billion yearly just from subscriptions. Then there are shop sales, expansions, licensing, and services. Overwatch does have a subscription , a little licensing, and not much of a shop so it doesn’t bring in as much.

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Armsbend

They all make so much money it would make more sense to simply hire more guys to work on different projects. No reason to kill the golden goose – even if it isn’t you biggest earner.

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Schmidt.Capela

Company resources, and in particular truly talented developers, are a limited resource; it’s hard to find and hire real talent. If WoW doesn’t hold the best growth prospects anymore for Blizzard, it makes sense to move the company’s best and brightest to other projects with better growth potential.

Besides, if WoW, in the eyes of Blizzard, has already transitioned into a cash cow with little to no growth potential, the conventional business approach in dealing with it would be to invest in it just enough resources to slow down its decline while milking it for all its worth.

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Armsbend

That is true – but Blizzard probably has less trouble recruiting than 99.99% of other developers. And if you don’t bring in new blood and freshness you stagnate and die – in any industry.

I think that’s why Blizzard so eagerly allows their guys to rotate into new positions. Keep it fresh.

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Knox Harrington

Depends on what you mean by “bright”. I don’t see the genre ever again hitting the high-water mark set by WoW at its peak. Even WoW can’t come close to its own numbers from years past. There is no MMORPG with a “bright” future in that sense. The genre has to devolve into the niche that it once was in order to survive. MMO developers and their financial backers have to stop looking at past metrics for measuring success. More realistic expectations need to be in place. That’s why I think a game like Camelot Unchained has the “brightest” future because it is a niche game catering to a very specific audience and its developers are not expecting to mirror WoW’s success. That’s the future.

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Ken from Chicago

STAR TREK ONLINE because it’s not the flashiest, doesn’t grab all the headlines (since often the news is about something going wrong or something controversial).

It is the unicorn of free-2-play mmos in that it is totally free. You can go from level 1 to max level, play the whole game free. There are no paywalls blocking game content. It’s not pay-2-win. It has a good business model of selling cosmetic items or convenience items but the free items look really good (as opposed to the old trick of making them hideous and only paid costume looks awesome).

It’s not perfect. It has lockboxes, but the lockbox notifications can be turned off. It has a fantastic story that BUILDS on the IP and even gets stars from the tv series and movies to do voice work i the game.

— Ken from Chicago

P.S. The new movies and tv series potentially add more lore to the game.

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connor_jones

Agree completely with you about their business model. I’ve made it all the way to end game with a T5 Mirror Universe ship on advanced difficulty, so obviously paying real cash for a T6 ship is a nice-to-have but not a necessity. Further, I love how you can change your player avatar appearance and uniform colors completely free, whereas other mmo’s sock it to you on that.

Concerning the Abrams movies and Discovery, I’m sorry to say that for me they represent the dumbing down of Trek for mass consumption. Star Trek used to be known as the brainier cousin of Star Wars, but not so much these days. How I miss the heady days of DS9 and the final season of Enterprise. Sighs.

Not to end on a negative, I am definitely jazzed about the long rumored and awaited Gamma Quadrant/Dominion/DS9 expansion due out this summer or fall I think.

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Cosmic Cleric

Concerning the Abrams movies and Discovery, I’m sorry to say that for me they represent the dumbing down of Trek for mass consumption. Star Trek used to be known as the brainier cousin of Star Wars, but not so much these days. How I miss the heady days of DS9 and the final season of Enterprise. Sighs.

+1, you’re not alone.

I really hate it when the things that I care about get co-opted. :/

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BalsBigBrother

No idea my crystal ball broke a long long time ago.

If I am being honest I always find these questions a bit pointless. It is essentially guess which you think is going to do the well from a skewed perspective. We have no real control over any games future nor enough relevant information to even make any informed guesses.

I mean how many times have folks (inc. me) said Wildstar is going onto the chopping block almost since launch yet its still here somehow nearly four years later.

For me personally I have come to the conclusion that its best for me to just enjoy what I have in front of me and to just let the future take care of itself when it comes to games / mmos.

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Sally Bowls

Whereas for me, while I also think these sort of questions are pointless for SPG, they feature heavily into my decisions for MMOs. It is the reason I dismiss most Kickstarters without significant analysis of gameplay. It is a reason I would be hesitant to restart Wildstar. It is the reason I will automatically preorder WoW expansions.

I find the forecast, including financial, far more relevant for a genre that is selling ongoing, episodic content than one-off games.

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BalsBigBrother

If that sort of analysis works for you then its all good have at it but its not something that would work for me.

Also given some of the really perceptive comments / podcast questions you have made in the past I suspect you have access to slightly more relevant information than the average person who posts here. Which I imagine would help with that approach.

I don’t do kickstarters (for games) either but I suspect our reasons for that will be different. ;-)

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Isey

I agree with you. I just started playing Everquest 2. I bought it at launch and didn’t like. I spent the holidays exploring the four different streamlined starting zones with four characters now at mid 20s, and I haven;t even hit a drop in the bucket of content that is there. Don’t even need new games, there are so many old ones that really are great in their own way. Heck, thanks for reminding me about WildStar! I always wanted to finish the main story campaign….

oldandgrumpy
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oldandgrumpy

Make sure you get to max level in EQ2 and see everything you want to see there as it’s future looks very rocky.

Triona Falconer
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Triona Falconer

Just dreaming here… but I would love to see Daybreak sell the title back to Sony. I feel it is dying a not-so-slow death in DB’s hands. Or perhaps another company that’s realizes the potential of the titles.

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Sylkesh

TESO and FF XIV seem promised to a bright future in 2018. BDO also had a very good 2017 year and should continue on its rising path in 2018. I’m not informed enough to assess the 2018 potential of GW2, I’ll let the experts deal with this one.
And let’s not forget WoW and FF XI, the elders but very healthy MMOs, with a very bright 2018 future.

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IronSalamander8 .

Sums up my thoughts as well although I know little of FFXI.

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Sylkesh

Well, FF XI producer sent an e-mail recently to FF XI players (actual and former) explaining that they plan to go on with their monthly updates and produce more content for the game in 2018. Not bad for a MMO in maintenance mode.

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TheDonDude

I guess WoW. It’s hard to imagine it ever going under.

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Schmidt.Capela

Longevity is kinda different from having a bright future, though.

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Sally Bowls

How different though? I feel the existing games that I can play today far brighter than all those “far-superior”[sic] games that shut down years ago

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Utakata

Existing games always have a brighter future than those shut down though. Unless those games are being planned to be resurrected at some point.

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Schmidt.Capela

Every duck is a bird, but not every bird is a duck.

Or, in other words, longevity is required, but not enough, for a bright future.

WoW is almost certain to last a long time, perhaps more so than any other MMO; this doesn’t guarantee future quality, though.

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Utakata

Thought that was, “Every Poodle is a dog, but not all dogs are Poodles.” o.O

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TheDonDude

Sure, but WoW does have a bright future. Classic + a new expansion? Both of these look like they’ll do pretty gosh darn well.

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Schmidt.Capela

Your comment was kinda implying that not going under anytime soon equates a bright future. I don’t think that is true, which is what I was writing about.

Estranged
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Estranged

There is no future in being shuttered.

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Bryan Turner

I would say Zenimax and Blizzard are going to have a good year, Blizzard because it’s Blizzard and Zenimax because of their highly successful game coupled with their massive settlement from suing Facebook.

Tizmah
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Tizmah

I’m not sure, because it doesn’t seem like the MMO (RPG) genre is too healthy right now. Seems like what I enjoyed about them is slowly but surely dying to give way to more moba, battle royale, or coop experiences.

pepperzine
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pepperzine

And solo :(

Euclio
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Euclio

To me we are looking at having the same four ‘big’ games, that is WoW, ESO, FFXIV and GW2. The three first games in particular give excellent value for money with their update cadence (who thought we would be saying that about WoW!?!) and, to be blunt, offer a game experience that is more than good enough for most.

Just about every other game is conceivably either in trouble or able to quickly become so. There are a whole hose of new games on the horizon though that it would be amazing to see do well, although the recent business models for most fill me with dread!

If I was looking at a game that I would be worried for it is LOTRO. Always loved that game, but with the new Amazon show and therefore renewed interest in that world I simply can’t see the existing game not being replaced with something newer.

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Loyal Patron
Nic Hickman

I could be wrong but I seem to recall Standing Stone got their Tolkein licence renewed for a fair long while before they released the most recent Xpac? I’m pretty sure that would preclude another LOTR mmo even being developed? Unless it was Standing Stone doing it.

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Bryan Turner

I’d list GW2 at the top of the second Tier, they put out respectable content on a regular basis, they have a solid veteran population, how ever their community is significantly smaller than the big 3 which puts them at more financial risk, for example I criticize them for not having tiered raiding and quality balancing now I don’t believe they lack a will to do this I just think they are limited by their budget to truly polish what they have. Unfortunately there’s only so much Open World content I’m willing to farm as a Reaper, they seem really good at producing nice looking GEM Store items to encourage their core vets to spend way more than they should (I spent tons of money with no regrets); then look at a game like ESO whose cash shop items are frankly boring as sin how ever they have an attractive Sub model with really top notch in depth story content to encourage their concurrent 2.5 million population to either stay subbed or buy the DLCs.

Duey Bear
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Duey Bear

Overall I can agree, however I would add BDO, Runescape, Path of Exile and Blade and Soul to the list of very secure games in no danger of shutdown or obscurity before the 2020s.

Euclio
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Euclio

Totally fair, strangely Runescpae may well end up being more secure than the majority with their mobile port.

Duey Bear
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Duey Bear

Even I am hyped for the changes the mobile version may bring to the engine, and I have not done much with Runescape for a few years.

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