The Daily Grind: Which game made the biggest contribution to killing the MMORPG genre in 2017?

Last year, Massively OP commenter deekay_zero proposed this topic as a joke award, but when we ran it as a Daily Grind, it prompted really great responses (in spite of the obvious trolls). As we observed at the time, how you answer depends on what you think actually ails MMORPGs (assuming you think the MMO genre is in trouble to begin with) – whether it’s business model shenanigans or bad design pushing people and companies away, or other genres pulling MMO players out, or something else entirely.

So we wanted to pull the topic out again to see whether the answer has changed. 2017 was a big year for gaming, after all, as we saw the (re)birth of an entire spinoff genre. Did that influence our home genre in a good way or bad? Which game, MMO or otherwise, made the biggest contribution toward killing the MMORPG genre specifically in 2017?

Every morning, the Massively Overpowered writers team up with mascot Mo to ask MMORPG players pointed questions about the massively multiplayer online roleplaying genre. Grab a mug of your preferred beverage and take a stab at answering the question posed in today’s Daily Grind!
SHARE THIS ARTICLE
Code of Conduct | Edit Your Profile | Commenting FAQ | Badge Reclamation | Badge Key

LEAVE A COMMENT

111 Comments on "The Daily Grind: Which game made the biggest contribution to killing the MMORPG genre in 2017?"

Subscribe to:
Sort by:   newest | oldest | most liked
Reader
fanggwj

I’d have to say that Diablo 3 despite being left in development limbo land is still taking a chunk of interest/player base in MMO’s. They have refined and honed key essences of the draw of MMO’s into better and easily digestible bites:
-gear grind, content scaling, dungeon runs, crafting,
-seamless co-op, dungeon difficulty system
My other pick is the Division. It’s adventuring (side quests and hunts for cel phones, drones and intelligence briefings) and the credible world they built that justifies the draw. The world is the most credible and interesting world I have seen in a video game that still remains playable. the weathering and the clutter makes all other video game cities seem cartoonish, facades or set pieces.

Reader
Alex Malone

My vote goes to Destiny 2.

It is yet another game that proves that a lot of players don’t give a shit about being massively-multiplayer. Destiny 2 shares a lot of features with standard MMORPGs, yet it isn’t an MMO. So, not only is it taking players away from actual MMOs, it is showing other developers / publishers that they don’t need to build a proper MMO in order to attract players from the genre.

My backup vote would be for Albion Online.

It’s one of the first indie MMOs to release and it didn’t do too well. All we saw was stories about unstable servers, think there might have been a character wipe in there somewhere, complaints about endless ganking and a general lack of content. Given that all the AAA developers have given up on the genre, we’re now reliant on crowd-funded indie MMOs so we really need a big win on that front to increase consumer confidence and re-attract AAA devs.

Reader
connor_jones

What you said about Destiny 2 makes a lot of sense. If anyone doubts this trend, they need look no further than Secret world going from mmo to shared world, the small number of players per instance in Star Citizen, to say nothing of the increased number of RPG’s covered by Massively with (actual or proposed) multiplayer elements like Anthem, No Man’s Sky, Cyberpunk, Conan Exiles, Andromeda, etc.

Reader
bobfish

MMORPG genre is still growing year on year.

Just because the AAA western MMO is a thing of the past, it doesn’t mean the genre is getting smaller. I actually think it’s the healthiest it has ever been, with more innovation, variation and diversity within the genre than ever before.

Reader
Danny Smith

Still WoW. MMO’s still exist but by and large the mmorpg died with world of warcraft. Ain’t gonna see another big rpg focussed one for a long time if ever.

veldara
Reader
veldara

I hope you’ll forgive me when I say I take umbrage towards this question. Nothing is killing the MMORPG genre, I firmly believe that it’s just evolving and changing from what we were used to for so long. We can argue that the “RPG” part of MMORPG is being diminished for most recent titles, and there’s certainly an argument to be made there, but MMOs as a whole is still going strong.

Sure, they might not have the persistent worlds, and the days of going out into the plains and seeing many players is giving way to lobbies, but the sense of community is still there.

Reader
Robert Mann

MMOs that haven’t changed beyond glitter and a few odd systems to ensure there’s no need for anyone other than NPCs in the world for… a decade or more.

I’m fine with that being part of the genre. But AAA hasn’t moved past that, and that’s the source of the stagnant layer of algae on the MMO pool. We haven’t even gotten NPCs as cool as those in games from the late 90s, the writing stinks, and the entire focus remains on the cheap combat system with carrots to pull people along.

It’s sourced out of the success of WoW, and the greed of those seeing the numbers there… but I don’t really blame WoW for it. Having games like WoW is a good thing, the problem is the ‘success chase mentality’ of business, which has not really worked out well for gaming anywhere.

Reader
steve

World of Warcraft, maybe. WoW players are a massive demographic, and odds are if they’re still into MMOs they’re still playing WoW for at least a few months out of the year. Rather hard to make inroads against an institution like that.

Anyone looking for ‘something new’ is drifting into different sorts of virtual worlds. PUBG isn’t my thing, but I can see why it’s popular, and I can’t miss the obvious fusion of elements from the survival/voxel games like Minecraft. So our worlds, if less MMORPG, are yet becoming more interactive and larger in scale.

Pretty soon we’re going to have maps the size of small planets. We just might be able to revisit the idea of ecosystems and strong AI in our mobs. We may not be seeing better MMORPGs lately, but I do see the tools and technology that will let us revisit the MMORPG without some of the limitations we had previously.

Reader
Robert Mann

Sadly, MMOs are about 15-20 years behind many of the single player systems out there, just the graphics are kept closer. I’d love to see that change, but I’m wary because it hasn’t.

Reader
Kickstarter Donor
NeoWolf

Lockbox heavy games any and all

Reader
Crowe

My answer isn’t really a specific game… it’s just the asian imports with poor localization. They look interesting but after a few hours of play, you find yourself deluged with shallow gameplay, a multitude of confusing/pointless game systems, and poor localization. I’d like fewer of those for the next few years and we’ll see if games seem to be improving.

Reader
Alex Hyer

WoW killed the genre. There is no greater example of a game that did.

Reader
Bruno Brito

Why blame WoW for being successful? Blame the copies.

Reader
Alex Hyer

Because it started it.

You blame the person who started the fire who burned the building down. Thats how blaming works.

Reader
McGuffn

Star Wars BF2

Reader
Melissa McDonald

I’ve actually been enjoying that game. yes, it runs kind of clunky, but it looks incredible, and it’s very star wars-y.

Reader
connor_jones

I would be curious to try it despite the controversy and bad press, as it does indeed look very beautiful and ‘star warsy’ as you say. That said, the lack of a free demo and no player character customization are definite turn offs for me.

Reader
rafael12104

Lol. This made me laugh. Thank you. :)

Reader
Jeffery Witman

The genre used to be much broader in scope before Wow narrowed the perceived profitability window. Once that delusion was realized by the studios and developers the f2p/cash shop phase began in earnest to make up for all the disappointing returns on big IP titles (even though most still made plenty of money). In search of even bigger profits the lockbox era began shortly afterward and is in full bloom right now.

The push back against lock boxes has resulted in the newest form of economic elitism to infect the genre: crowdfunding. Monthly sub fees may have cost a little bit, but the f2p cash shops pulled in a lot more, especially when games made it so that QoL was terrible without sub and/or cash shop money flowing in regularly. The lockbox era has made many games impossible to enjoy without heavy call investment. However, we’ve progressed to the point that in order for the game to even be started you have to put up money. I’m afraid to even think of the next steps, but they seem obvious: custom games for those who can fund it, never released to outsiders, sustained by a private club of those who can afford it, maybe those who own stock in it, similar to how some private pools work in the real world.

No big studios are willing to take a financial risk anymore, and I think it’s fair to say that more and more of the players are unwilling to pay for the same old stuff. It’s an impasse.

MMORPGs are being killed by the people who produce them.

Reader
Kickstarter Donor
Greaterdivinity

Honestly, I’m struggling to think of any MMORPG‘s that had a strong impact one way or the other last year. I feel like the genre is going through a bit of a lull, we had some solid updates for a lot of existing games and a few semi-relevant MMO releases mixed in alongside closures/missteps, so it kinda balanced out overall.

The MMO missteps were honestly in other MMO genre’s rather than RPG’s.

semugh
Reader
semugh

yeah, the header image. PU:BG.

Reader
Dug From The Earth

come on people….

mmoRPG

not MMO

MMO’s are thriving….. mmoRPGs however, arent.

hurbster
Reader
hurbster

I didn’t realize it was dead.

Reader
Dug From The Earth

The MMO genre is alive and well

the mmoRPG genre has been stale and clinging to the edge of oblivion for a couple years now.

It would be like if there were only 5 starbucks left in the world, and a handfull of small privately owned coffee shops.

The thing that is killing it off isnt a specific game. Its the complete lack of trying from any big studio to make a mmorpg these days.

Reader
Melissa McDonald

“it is to VR that we must place our hopes.” (Gandalf voice)
“VR. VR is dead. I was there, Gandalf, when the Virtual Boy was released.” (Elrond voice)
“There is one who might reclaim the immersion.” (Gandalf voice)
“Not until they raise the resolution.” (Elrond voice)
“There are more forces at work than just the will of Facebook. And that is an encouraging thought.” (Gandalf voice)

Reader
Robert Mann

ROFL

Reader
Kickstarter Donor
Dividion

HTC released some new Vive product announcements at CES today. Vive Pro w/ 2880×1600 screens (per eye), wireless adapter for existing devices (releasing this summer). Might be switching from the Rift if it meets expectations, and if Oculus doesn’t come up with something comparable. Still plenty of time though. The Rift is still working great.

Reader
Bryan Correll

It’ll be stone dead in a moment.

Reader
Melissa McDonald

it’s not fooling anyone, you know!

Reader
Kickstarter Donor
Alex Willis

Going to echo those who have brought up “classic” servers. I don’t actually begrudge people the desire to want to play these — we all have our “favourite” moments in MMORPG time — but these seem like dangerous demands to make of a studio’s time. I am generally very suspicious of nostalgia, and while fans of classic servers deny that it is nostalgia that drives them, it’s difficult to see how a genre can evolve to suit the changing needs of its audience by catering to successes of the past. (We all have that friend who insists that music never got better after the Beatles, right? Well, he’s fun to hang out with once or twice a year but his “arguments” in favor of musical orthodoxy get pretty tiresome. )

Reader
Chosenxeno .

Thank You for this. I’ve been saying it forever. Falling back Archaic Design Philosophies will not save the genre. Especially when the games are more concerned with being the “Anti-WoW” without analyzing why Blizzard was able to KILL THOSE PHILOSOPHIES ON IT’S 1ST TRY. Innovation will improve the genre. Not designs from an age where the systems only existed due to technical limitations or a desire to keep people playing as long as possible.

Reader
rafael12104

Hmm. Well, if you are really going to tackle this, then you need to deal with the sticky wicket that is defining what an MMORPG is now.

Oh, I know old vets like me have some ideas, but the fact is the genre has evolved and lines have become blurred.

So, rather than open that can of worms, mostly because I’m lazy but also because it is useless, I’ll name one of many dev-publihsers who is a threat to all forms of MMOs. Activision.

You see, this past year Activision patented monetization methods which insidiously use loot drops and grouping to “shape” demand. So, for example, you will see that swanky weapon you don’t have used with great success by others in your group and ammo drops for that said weapon rain down while you don’t get shit for yours.

That type of manipulation will further erode consumer confidence because, as we have also seen this year, gamers aren’t stupid. We might be sheep, but we make damn good use of Reddit and Youtube.

Reader
starbuck1771

No single game is killing the MMO genre. The issue is over saturation. We live in a time when MMO has lost it’s meaning because people keep adding to the definition. These days the market is flooded with new MMO’s most of which are low budget crap. Then you have people making pixel art style games trying to play off nostalgia. The real issue is nobody has brought anything really new to the table and that’s hurting the genre. You can only flood the genre with so many copy & paste hack and slash games before people start to lose interest.

Reader
Oleg Chebeneev

Agreed 100%. Its why my most anticipated MMO is the one that moves the genre forward, instead of playing on nostalgia or copying what was before it.

Dab
Reader
Kickstarter Donor
Dab

Not a game per se, but IMO the biggest cause is articles saying that the genre is being “killed” in the first place. Sure the battle royale thing is hurting online social participation, but not “killing” the MMORPG genre. Lockboxes also hurt, but there is always a market correction for these issues eventually. Having said that, I personally miss the subscription-only model of my MMORPG gaming heydays.

Sometimes, we can be our own worst enemies’. Still love you MOP, so not pinning this on you folks. ;)

Reader
Melissa McDonald

coming soon

killing.jpg
Reader
rafael12104

Schlag? Is that you? LOL

Reader
Melissa McDonald

He was AWOL. I’m the B team.

Reader
Bryan Correll

That’s great. It just needs a foreword by David Von Dorman.

deekay_plus
Reader
Patreon Donor
deekay_plus

i loled

Reader
Melissa McDonald

for the last 10 years the answer would be WoW. Because imitation of that title ruined the genre and stagnated it. WoW sucked all the air out of the room.

Now? it’s the “PvP Survival Sandbox”. People are all building those in lieu of MMOs, yet calling them MMOs, or at least pitching them in that space.

Reader
Robert Mann

I do think the PvP problem is a noted one, and developers are starting to pay attention to that. Rumors of cooperative focused sandboxes have started popping up, and I’m going to bet the first one with deep systems that can pull off large numbers will be a hit.

Because nothing is more fun for many people than building something cool over the long term with friends and sharing that… and nothing is less fun for those people than having it kicked down.

Reader
steve

I would argue that if the survival sandbox is killing the MMORPG genre, it’s because those games are providing innovation outside of the themepark. Those sandboxes are turning into the next generation of MMO. All of those custom maps can be bridged one to another just like the early MMORPG zones. There’s nothing at all stopping someone from building an MMORPG with that canvas, and I think it would be more popular as a platform if we nixed things like having to eat every 10 minutes.

borghive
Reader
borghive

Now? it’s the “PvP Survival Sandbox”.

These games have way more social interaction and have been more fun than any MMO I ever played. Sure there can be a lot of heartache in these games, but there are tons of PVE servers as well that let you play in peace.

These survival games for me are what MMOs should be, having tons of choices and freedom to do what you want, not just playing through single player, on rails, boring quest grinders ,then jumping on the raid loot treadmill at the end. I actually get immersed in the world and my actions have a real impact on the server I am playing on and I need friends and social interaction to succeed.

Sure these serves don’t have thousands of players, but I can assure you server caps of 100 can really offer a great social experience. I’ve made more friends playing Ark the last 3 years than I have combined playing MMOs since 2001.

Reader
Robert Mann

Well, LiFMMO does have several thousand on servers at this point, with optimizations yet to be worked in many cases.

That said, depending on where you are will make or break the game for people. If you want to be alone, then you really have to take the effort to run off somewhere nobody wants to be. If you are willing to talk to other people, at least, and work out a deal, some places will be friendly. If you just don’t talk to people, any group will kick you out of their area.

Which is just logical with spying and sabotage in a PvP game… which is half of why people are frustrated. The PvP aspects of any MMO, ever, have always had an influence on PvE whether in group or solo. It’s a daunting problem where some of the population demands both, and everyone else suffers.

Reader
Crowe

I’ve had completely the opposite experience. I’d like to try and build something but the guy who spawned next door would *really* like whatever I was trying to build… enough to take a spear to me. But I’m glad someone had a good experience with these things! Nowadays, I just stay away from that unholy trinity of PvP, survival, and sandboxes.

Reader
starbuck1771

And I would disagree. You can’t really blame WoW because of idiots trying to outperform them. Blizzard didn’t say hey we are better then you we dare you to do better then WoW. That decision was made by the other developers.

On a side note it didn’t help when idiots were going around proclaiming all the new games being made would be the WoW killer. Fourteen years later WoW is still on top of the pile meanwhile how many of those WoW killers have sunset?

Reader
Robert Mann

Sadly, big corporate culture means that the chase was bound to happen, and where I don’t blame WoW or Blizzard for that… I do think the root of the problem lies therein.

I blame Blizzard for their customer relations, but that’s not this. You are 100% correct that WoW is not to blame for the moves others made. I just also do think that discussing the actual problem requires noting that success as a catalyst behind the stagnation.

Reader
wratts

If it’s “damaging” the MMO marketplace, then I have to agree that PUBG style battle royales are probably going to siphon away funds and talent that in other years would have gone to MMOs, same as MOBAs and card games did in prior years.
As for “killing”, I think that’s obviously hyperbolic. The genre as a whole is alive and doing pretty well. There are some titles out that people are really enjoying, some crowdfunded ventures that are about to pop, and some studio games like Amazon’s New World that I think will see more news this year (or an outright cancellation).
The rumors of the MMO’s demise have been greatly exagerrated

deekay_plus
Reader
Patreon Donor
deekay_plus

the hyperbole of “killing” the genre is i think part of the joke. and part of ye olde meme of w/e game killing wow or killing mmo’s or w/e of the previous 10 billion years of mmo clones XD

Reader
wratts

Figured, but y’know

Reader
Arktouros

2017 was a pretty quiet year all around. It was another year of expansions and game updates with the only really new release to my memory being Albion which is dying it’s slow PvP game death. AAA studios have stopped developing full on MMOs and instead focused on online titles with MMO elements in order to keep players playing and (hopefully) continuously paying. A lot of the Kickstarter MMOs are still in development for a few more years yet but will, if nothing else, at least try something different than just making a by-the-numbers clone of existing games. Nothing really dying, but nothing really exciting either.

If I had to pick one thing, it’d be the WOW Classic announcement as I could see other studios mistaken that they could do the same. A trip down memory lane for 5 minutes is fun and all but I don’t want to plan my future there.

Reader
Patreon Donor
Veldan

*its

Reader
Arktouros

thx for that your a stand up dude I appreciate you’re effort in pointing out my grammer its realy nice of u!

Reader
Patreon Donor
Veldan

.

eye-fire.jpg
Reader
Kickstarter Donor
Rees Racer

There is no “killing” of MMO’s. It’s all just market correction and/or response to what players want in their games.

Compare Destiny 2 and Warframe, for example. Very similar games in theme and content, yet the latter makes much more of an effort to at least appear to be an MMO of sorts. The former has so many elements that could have made it more MMO-like, but seems to have dropped the ball for what fans of the genre want and need. Warframe is 4 years old, and still gaining numbers and has become hugely successful. The Destiny franchise seem to be languishing, presently…as good a game as it actually is.

I think what we are seeing is a merging-progression of the genre, more than the killing of it. Until server technology really (REALLY) catches up to make graphic-intensive single-shard MMO experiences, then we will continue to see these hybrids continue to be popular.

Reader
Robert Mann

That’s actually something I’m hugely hopeful for out of Life is Feudal… the server tech. A full world with servers working together where you can see what is across the server line! It has issues still, but it could lead to some very cool things in the long run.

The game itself will, well, inevitably have issues between PvP and those who like the other parts. That is what it is, and I’m not about to fool myself on it. The idea of justice systems still seems good, but implementation has failed time and again. I’ll keep holding my breath on those until one has some real tooth, rather than just a hyped up bark that turns out to be more of a pained yip.

Reader
rafael12104

I hope you are right. I do believe that the genre isn’t dying. But my outlook for the evolution of MMOs is bleak at the moment. I’m afraid they will transform into P2W cash boxes.

Reader
Loyal Patron
Armsbend

I think this is tongue in cheek but I’ll say it anyway – there are still well over 10M MMORPGs players across all games. Probably many, many more. People are wasting away money at MMORPGs that don’t even exist.

It may not be going in the direction some people want it but killed? Not even close.

Reader
rafael12104

Same thought. It’s not dying it is being made and Alien from the Alien movies. Only way forward?

Nuke.jpg
deekay_plus
Reader
Patreon Donor
deekay_plus

btw the linked to TDG from ~1 year ago doesn’t have any comments. and then i remembered the death of livefyre. QQ

Reader
Sally Bowls

Losing the comments was very, very sad. But on balance it was worth it to get rid of livefyre.

Reader
Utakata

Anything with an emphasis on pay to access and/or whale pre-releases which seem to be always be in a perpetual state of pre-release. I mean gaming industry must had a stroke of genius when they figured they could monetize alpha/beta modes for their projects…as they could always string along their patrons, cut profits, while never really releasing their game. To me, this has hurt MMO industry overall, because nothing really new or interesting has been released last year…or the year before. And maybe even not this year. Therefor, stagnating the entire game genre IMO.

Of course, I should be giving examples because the today’s DG is asking for it…but I don’t want to mention the likes of Star Citizen. as that could generate too much controversy. So I won’t mention that game at all… >.>

Reader
starbuck1771

The problem with that theory is early access and crowdfunding covers the entire gaming industry not just MMO’s.

Reader
Robert Mann

And it is a problem across the industry, sadly. However, the $10,000 tier stuff seems to strongly be aimed at MMOs just yet. Maybe I haven’t looked enough though.

Reader
Utakata

Yes it does. A long with lockboxing. That said, it still leaves me with a sour taste in my mouth as far as MMO’s are concerned. As well as inspiring the industry away from more traditional releases to something far more dubious instead.

Estranged
Reader
Kickstarter Donor
Estranged

You have done it now!

Joe is beaming in!

Reader
Oleg Chebeneev

I always laughed at all those talks about MMORPG genre being killed. Kids, MMORPG genre is barely born and still making its first steps.

borghive
Reader
borghive

Stagnation is killing MMOs. Studios that are either making MMOs and ones that are currently released have had very little innovation the last 10 years.

Reader
Loyal Patron
Patreon Donor
Dobablo

I nominate Lineage 2 Revolution.
For years we’ve had people complaining that MMOs have moved from challenging games of skill to timesinks that throw out rewards just require turning up. With L2R, idle games enter the MMO-scene and now we don’t even need to play to progress!
I am exaggerating. L2R is a good game that does idle-gaming well, where it is useful for casual grinding but much less so for endgame. It’s contribution to killing the MMORPG genre is from all the clones that will copy the idle-gaming model and apply it to the full game.

Reader
Robert Mann

Aye, the trend toward games that play themselves is an issue… I don’t mind the idea of simulations and all, but when the only interaction is click the rewards you want? Meh.

Reader
Loyal Patron
Patreon Donor
Dobablo

Don’t make me go online to check which reward is best. I want a game that automatically chooses the best reward for me!

Reader
Robert Mann

LOL, I’m sure it’s coming soon.

deekay_plus
Reader
Patreon Donor
deekay_plus

what l2r sounds like is a neat little l2 “clone” i used to play about 10 years ago called sword of the new world (aka granada espada or sword 2) in which you control a party of 3 avatars that pretty much automatically grind a spawn camp with some caveats and limitations.

as someone who played with botting in l2 at the end of my time playing to kind of confirm/deny my suspicians about who and when people were botting in the ~2 years i played i found it quite interesting in various ways.

Reader
Ken from Chicago

WORLD OF WARCRAFT. Its massive commercial success influenced TPTB to chase after its success by mimicking it, as a theme park, as a (Western) Fantasy mmo, even the mmo trinity of tank / healer / DPS. Good mmos were cancelled early because TPTB had higher expectations of commercial success. Good mmos were never made because it was too different from WoW. Even now, despite superheroes and science fiction dominating movies and tv, still the overwhelming majority of mmos and new mmos is Western Fantasy (with a few Eastern ones even discounting straight up imports).

deekay_plus
Reader
Patreon Donor
deekay_plus

this post feels about 3 or more years out of date >>

Reader
starbuck1771

Try over a decade. Even MJ has been drinking this Kool-Aid. The fact is WoW is to blame for none of it. The fact is Warcraft was an existing IP and Blizz made the game their way with the right combination of features. Meanwhile all the other developers were worried about graphics and the such which even today they still are because of the graphics fanboys.

WoW is an MMO just like any other the difference is WoW was accessible to people with older computers and graphics cards which game them a larger group to market to.

Reader
Ken from Chicago

I’m not blaming WoW. I’m saying publishers keep mimicking it (its genre, gameplay and still stuck on $15/mo sub vs other $ amounts) in hopes of mimicking its once-commercial success.

Ashes of Creation, Crowfall, Shard Of the Avatar, ArcheAge, Rift, etc. Fantasy still dominates mmos. Sure, they “branch out” to have Eastern fantasy, Age of Wushu, Blade & Soul, etc.

Reader
Robert Mann

Agreed that it is not to blame, but the fallout from it’s success is very much real… and very much the place to put blame. AAA chases success, not just in MMOs, and that’s where we all have a problem.

Reader
Patreon Donor
Kickstarter Donor
agemyth 😩

Star Citizen.

Something like Destiny 2, assuming it continues to be popular, gives most of the experience people associate with modern MMOs in a game with much smaller scope but much friendlier to most players.

Estranged
Reader
Kickstarter Donor
Estranged

yeah, it really is a balance thing

many of us just don’t have time for the time sinks, any longer

we want to actually play in our 1-2 hour session

let’s face it, lots of MMO players, our lives have changed

Reader
Kickstarter Donor
Modrain

PUBG. Yup, not an MMO.

First, I believe in general that any multiplayer genre that takes the spotlight tend to attract a lot of funds that won’t go elsewhere. It’s been the case for MMOs during a period, then MOBAs, Minecraft-likes, etc. I’m afraid we’ll see more and more battle royales in the incoming months, some with guns, some with swords and board, whatever studios will think of. MMOs have been in a drought of funds for quite some time now, and it sure won’t help to bring them back.

Second, PUBG is actually close to MMORPGs in terms of gameplay structure (not actual gameplay). Looting, roaming, looking for opponents, avoiding them, multiple ways to achieve what you want to do, playing with a team, a duo, or solo… It has the same type of freeform gameplay as MMOs, you decide what to do. It’s not exactly durable, but playing PUBG tends to satiate quite well my hunger for MMO freedom. While it’s not the same for everyone, you’re never alone either, and I’m certainly curious to know more about the overlap between MMO and PUBG players, and those who left for the firsts for the second.

And third, visibility. As MMO players, most of us probably knew Bluehole for being an MMO developer, and working on Tera for years. When A:IR was announced, it was “PUBG developer announces new MMO”, not “Tera developer announces new MMO”. It’s not surprising as PUBG now evokes something to more people than Tera, but by being so known, it sorts of erase in the background the other achievements of the studio, despite Tera not being a minor MMO. The only hope I have on this point is that on the long run, it might bring more visibility to A:IR, but it’s not a certitude. On the short term, though, it makes an MMO like Tera less visible.

Reader
Loyal Patron
Armsbend

If anything the rise of Battle Royale will cannibalize MOBAs more than anything else. The next big thing will always take players away from the last big thing.

Reader
Kickstarter Donor
Modrain

In general I’d say it is true but in this case I don’t think MOBAs are at a risk.

MOBA players are mostly driven by winning/ranking while PUBG players are driven by playing/competiting. There’s 1 chance out of 2 to win in a MOBA game, when in PUBG it’s 1 out of 100/~50/~30 depending the mode. The incentives are very different, I don’t think one could replace the other.

Reader
Kickstarter Donor
squidgod2000

I’m afraid we’ll see more and more battle royales in the incoming months

And we’ll see it shoehorned into existing games. I’d bet my left nut that Trion is building a BR mode for Defiance and that’s what they were talking about a few weeks ago when they said it was going to get some love/updates.

deekay_plus
Reader
Patreon Donor
deekay_plus

i can’t think of any games within the genre that stand out this year. so maybe it’s not a single game specifically but rather a paradigm that has been around a while but more pronounced now

and that is mediocrity in teh face of heightened monetization. no particular dlc or expack this year was all that exciting imo. and it was often coupled with more pay walls more hostage holding and more MTs, and more and more lockboxes.

it seems in a genre that is so predicated on givng a player a feeling of winning on a regular basis to keep them logging in and spending, the masters of this genre can’t help but can’t suck the life and money out of the players who love it, ultimately turning them away little by little.

while other types of games have stepped in that don’t quite scratch that ye olde proper mmo itch but certainly tend to be more palatable in various ways and keep certain realities in mind in ways that mmo’s just seem to ignore to their own detriment.

Estranged
Reader
Kickstarter Donor
Estranged

DK: well, I was being all negative about this topic, until reading your post

yep, I think they have done it to themselves as a whole, as well

Reader
TheDonDude

I don’t think any one game contributed all that much to it, to be honest. Heck, no game has ever really done so.

It’s more the lack of anything big and new coming down the pipe.

Reader
Schmidt.Capela

Not a single game, but the continuing trend towards adding MMO elements to non-MMO games everywhere. This greatly increases choice for the players that want those MMO features, allowing those players to enjoy the MMO elements they like without playing an actual MMO, and thus reduces the potential player base of MMOs everywhere.

It’s akin to what happened to both open PvP and virtual world MMOs after PvE-centric themepark MMOs started appearing; players that liked MMOs, but didn’t like either forced PvP or the virtual societies that formed in actual sandbox MMOs, migrated en masse to themepark PvE MMOs, turning PvP-enabled sandboxes from the mainstay of MMOs to a mere niche.

Reader
Robert Mann

That forced PvP is a huge one for sure, and the avoiding other people but having them in the background is… well, not as big, but I’m thinking significant. Where I think your point is true in part, I also think the lack of anything but clones in MMOs is the bigger issue. The moment MMOs step beyond combat simulators with a background image, and separate PvP and PvE fully (because the two always seem to butt heads, honestly, even if just because something needs adjusted in one because it harms the other) there will be a rush of interest (followed, sadly, by 20,000 clones which fail for the most part.)

Reader
Iridescence

I think MMOs have always been niche. WoW was a fluke. If you take out WoW even themeparks do not have huge audiences. I should stress there is nothing wrong with being a niche game.

Estranged
Reader
Kickstarter Donor
Estranged

There are some big Asian games and WoW, but yeah…

Niche.

Reader
Schmidt.Capela

The thing is, it’s more of a niche now than it was back then. Increased choice means a lot of players that would before have chosen MMOs now go for non-MMO games with MMO elements.

I don’t think it could be fought against, mind. Nevertheless it’s still damaging the MMO market in a similar way to how better and cheaper home-theater systems harmed movie theaters everywhere.

Tizmah
Reader
Tizmah

WoW! Killing MMOs every year since 2004.

Reader
starbuck1771

So blame the innocent. WoW didn’t do it. The idiots trying to outperform WoW did it.

Reader
Dug From The Earth

you could say WoW set the standard high, and others simply failed to match or exceed that standard, causing a bunch of failed games.

Reader
Robert Mann

I don’t even think it’s that… I think it was the money involved and the business choices to chase those figures. Which isn’t an MMO issue, it’s a business issue throughout gaming and around the world.

Reader
Dug From The Earth

well yeah, the money and resources and time needed for a company to match blizzards standards is more than most companies are willing to risk, so none have yet.

Reader
Robert Mann

I don’t think it’s even that. A number of major productions did a very solid job, all in all. However, they were just copies outside of the storyline, art, and names on things. And therein is the issue… there was nothing new or novel about a polished themepark at that point, and given that none of them are wise enough to invest outside what already exists, generally speaking…

Reader
starbuck1771

Exactly.

Estranged
Reader
Kickstarter Donor
Estranged

I was waiting for this, before posting. LOL

Tizmah
Reader
Tizmah

I figured I’d go ahead and say it so we can move past that subject.

Reader
Loopy

So first off, [studio] has continued completely ignoring the community and taking [game] into a direction that is clearly designed to milk whales out of their money. To add to that, [feature] has successfully killed off any remnant of server community, and [mechanic] is turning the game into an easymode carebear haven.

[game mode] is a continuation of a slap in the face for all players who have stuck with [game] since the beginning. It’s obvious that all development is catering to [other game mode] players, which are clearly less skilled than [game mode] pros. Balancing of classes is an ongoing teeter-totter of assigning FOTM back to [class], as it’s evident that all devs only cater to their own classes. Oh, and let’s not even talk about [unreleased feature] that has been promised for years now!

Finally, even after [time period] the progression is still locked behind [game mode], completely ignoring everyone who simply don’t have time to [game mode]. And all other MMOs are jumping on the [game] bandwagon, thinking they can just earn a quick buck!

[game] is clearly driving the entire genre straight into the ground!

Reader
TotalCowage .

Yup, it’s not a specific game, it’s an industry wide attitude, mixed with a maturing of perspective that players in general aren’t as tolerant as they once were of skinner box systems.

Reader
Denice J. Cook

I’ll get this party started: PUBG!

And I’ll bet it has gone a long ways toward killing off MOBAs, too.

pepperzine
Reader
pepperzine

Well this should be fun.

tumblr_mn9n8a5dtr1sn3u6vo1_500.gif
Reader
Utakata

…the gif seems to be doing a weird trippy thing too. o.O

Estranged
Reader
Kickstarter Donor
Estranged

yeah, I can’t stop watching and have this feeling that I need to smoke

Reader
Utakata

Lol! :)

Reader
Bruno Brito

I feel…sick :c

pepperzine
Reader
pepperzine

Sorry Bruno, that wasn’t my intention. Regardless, for now, I’m going to have to cut you off from the popcorn for your own good!

wpDiscuz