Fortnite addresses Meltdown vulnerability, settles another cheater lawsuit

Were you thinking you’d escaped all impact from the Meltdown vulnerability afflicting Intel systems? Fortnite players should think again, even consolers, as Epic Games has posted that it’s working with providers to repair its affected backend.

“All of our cloud services are affected by updates required to mitigate the Meltdown vulnerability,” writes the studio. “We heavily rely on cloud services to run our back-end and we may experience further service issues due to ongoing updates.”

Meanwhile, there’s been movement on another of the lawsuits Epic Games lodged against various individuals it accused of disseminating cheating software in Fortnite (including a 14-year-old kid). The lawsuit against one of the defendants, Charles Vraspir, was settled last month. RPS reports that another, Artem Yakovenko, also settled his suit, with each side paying its own legal fees and Yakovenko permanently banned from even so much as helping someone else cheat at an Epic Games title.

There’s this fun tease too:

Source: RPSEpic Games via Gamasutra
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12 Comments on "Fortnite addresses Meltdown vulnerability, settles another cheater lawsuit"

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deekay_plus
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deekay_plus

i wonder why this is affecting them so hard and not other games? including ones that are heavy on database usage like mmo’s which would incur the biggest penalties with this patch. including other ue4 games…

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Serrenity

Honestly, the other games probably just aren’t talking about it. Or if they say they aren’t impacted, they are lying through their teeth. This is literally an “everyone is impacted” scenario and I have done nothing else for the last 8 days except try to mitigate this crap.

On the other side of the fence, efficiently managed memory usage, db management, kernel interactions and things like that impact the degree to which you are impacted by the bug. The more efficient your db arch and mem management are, the less impacted you will be. Those other games might be more efficient, or just opting to fling more capacity to make up for the performance hit. Where the data is housed has an impact too – mechanical harddrives will see a more dramatic impact on performance than SSDs. I’ve seen a pretty substantial drops in Disk IOPS post-patching on SSDs – the problem will be even bigger on a mechanical drive.

Now I’ll skulk back to my Meltdown-cave.

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Schmidt.Capela

Isn’t Meltdown an issue exclusively for Intel processors? Anyone that uses AMD (or ARM) shouldn’t be impacted.

Though, of course, there’s Spectre, which impacts everyone. On the other hand, the fix for Spectre is supposed to cause less impact than the one for Meltdown.

deekay_plus
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deekay_plus

the performance hit is from the kernel patch in linux osx and windows which affects everyone.

not from teh bug itself.

CPUs with PCID are less affected by the patch. so any cpu made this decade by intel.

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Schmidt.Capela

Nope. The patch will be present for everyone, but only activated on systems that need it. If you are on Windows, you can test yourself to see if your system needs it and/or has it enabled.

(At least for both Windows and Linux; from my research both those systems disable the meltdown fix for AMD processors, as they don’t need it.)

deekay_plus
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deekay_plus

the patch is already rolled out. it’s been stopped being rolled out to systems with certain AMD cpus from ~15 years ago that it breaks.

however it does affect all brands of CPUs of systems it’s deployed to at this time.

https://www.pcworld.com/article/3246189/security/microsoft-halts-meltdown-patches-windows-amd-pcs-unbootable.html

been covering this very closely in my groups this past week.

amd wants a turn off switch in windows but there hasn’t been one yet. they also suggest skipping the linux fix.

however it is being rolled out to EVERYONE on linux and windows going back to 7. and if you are using amd cpu you are affected.

however again, the observed performance impact in most cases and usage scenarios is marginal to non existant.

additionally another flaw was found in AMD CPUs but AMD denies it can be exploited without physical access to teh machine and does not intend to work towards fixing it.

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Schmidt.Capela

As I said, the patch is being rolled for everyone, but the fix is only active in systems that need it, otherwise it isn’t enabled. My own (AMD) computer has it disabled, as you can see below:

KVAShadowRequired : False
KVAShadowWindowsSupportPresent : True
KVAShadowWindowsSupportEnabled : False

That means I already have the patch (SupportPresent : True), but it’s not enabled (SupportEnabled : False)

Similarly for Linux, the KPTI patch will be enabled by default in most if not all commercial distributions, but it will only be active when the processor is a vulnerable Intel one.

deekay_plus
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deekay_plus

the point was the performance hit is nonexistant to the average user.

deekay_plus
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deekay_plus

i don’t think i’ve seen other games say they aren’t affected. this is the only game i’ve seen have problems or talked about it at all.

my friends that do cloud and server stuff have generally said that it hasn’t impacted them as much as was being expected according to early estimates as wll.

and yet epic with fortnite seem to be hitting worst case scenario where thousands of other games are not.

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Zora

Yakovenko permanently banned from even so much as helping someone else cheat at an Epic Games title.

Is that something that is even feasible to enforce on any level?

I know settlements can include crazy clauses but…

k2apa
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k2apa

Can’t really enforce,

However EpicGames are constantly keeping an eye out on any sort of cheats being circulated.

It just means if EpicGames found this guy giving other people cheats, they can then sue the guy again for even more. Unless the guy’s super rich or an idiot, I doubt he would want to keep on losing money just for giving other people cheats.

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Tanek

I imagine it would be enforceable to the extent that he signed the legal papers for the settlement.
Would it be easy to catch someone doing that? Maybe not, but if he is found involved in something like creating or distributing cheats, what is he going to do? Say “ha! I had my fingers crossed when I signed that, so you lose!”?