The Daily Grind: Would you play a PvE game with full item decay?

One of the most insightful comments I ever saw about Darkfall (yes, Darkfall) was that, realistically, in a game with open PvP and full looting, it was inevitable that you’d lose all of the good gear you had on. That would always be a real risk, and it would always happen sooner or later. The real question was how long it would take you to rebuild to full power after such an event and how tedious it was to do so.

I’m not fond of that style of gameplay as it stands, but I still think about it, because it doesn’t need to be “full loot and free-for-all PvP” for that core principle to stand. A game with nothing but PvE could still have you lose gear as soon as you die, or it could ensure that your gear would eventually break and be unusable forever no matter how much you repair it.

On the one hand, this would kind of damage the very environment of a game like World of Warcraft with its emphasis on perpetual improvement; at the same time, it could also be seen as a way to break away from the game’s ever-upward treadmill, and it would mean that continued gear drops from world quests would still provide meaningful gear even if you have something better right now. So what do you think. Would you be interested in playing a PvE game where your gear decayed to nothing and you had to rebuild? Where you replaced a piece not because you got a stronger one, but simply because it was always time-limited?

Every morning, the Massively Overpowered writers team up with mascot Mo to ask MMORPG players pointed questions about the massively multiplayer online roleplaying genre. Grab a mug of your preferred beverage and take a stab at answering the question posed in today’s Daily Grind!
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114 Comments on "The Daily Grind: Would you play a PvE game with full item decay?"

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Karma_Mule
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Karma_Mule

Absolutely. Part of what makes Zelda Breath of the Wild fun for me is how constant weapon and shield decay creates an interesting dynamic. Going into each fight I had to gauge what equipment was most appropriate: use your best stuff too often and it wouldn’t be available when you really needed it.

Unlike traditional systems, it makes gear that is slightly less than your best still VERY useful, because it let you effectively fight powerful enemies while still saving your top gear for only the most urgent situations. That, plus the chance equipment could shatter in the middle of a battle adds a layer of strategy to even relatively mundane encounters that made them more interesting.

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RandomizedKirbyTree47

One game I used to play a lot is Realm of the Mad God, which is a hybrid between an MMORPG and a rogue-like game. One of the key features is that when you die, you die: death means that you start back at level 1 and lose everything that was in your inventory. Even at max level, dying can happen very quickly if you are fighting a hard boss. There is a “safe storage” where you can store a limited number of items that stay after you die (you can purchase more storage slots with real money), but you can’t actually use an item while it is in safe storage. The main reason to use safe storage is if you find a very rare item that can only be used by a specific class, you can store it until the next time you die and make your next character the class you need to use the item (RotMG does not feature a way to change classes except by starting a new character, which you can only do after your old character dies).

The game doesn’t have a lot of grinding–I have gotten to max level in a few hours on a new character. Getting the best items does take longer, although it takes as much skill as time, since you have to take part in fights against the most dangerous event bosses (and if you ever die, you have to start all over) and contribute a sufficient amount to get a rare item drop.

I guess the short answer is: Yes. i would and did play a game in which you can lose any and all of your items, and the game was entirely PvE (there is not PvP in RotMG).

Woetoo
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Woetoo

Would you be interested in playing a PvE game where your gear decayed to nothing […]

Maybe.

It would really depend on how the game dealt with the decay. Or perhaps, more realistically, how the developer/publisher dealt with monetising the process of maintenance/replacement.

I’ve often thought that lateral progression is something PvE games need.
I think you’d also need player ability decay alongside item decay.

The idea one day you’ve got the biggest badass weapons and armour necessary to defeat an old god who’s manifested on your plane of existence and the next day it might as well be worthless greens you can just about defeat a river crocodile with has never sat right with me. But if the next level of progression isn’t upwards, it has to be sidewards. And let’s be honest, if it were easy and something players would embrace… we’d already have it.

I think the decay (or player skill ability decline) would need to be logical. I don’t train/use my sword regularly – I get worse at it’s use. I hit something hard with something soft – it’s damaged. I have something made of metal – I need to perform some sort of regular maintenance to keep it in tip-top form.

It would be so easy for item decay to become a grind (which, let’s be honest, each new tier of gear is anyway). Oh my “great sword of badassery” is 50% damaged, time to go farm another one – isn’t a compelling game play loop.

As long as the core game play is the FUN bit, then I don’t see a problem. Especially if the decay process has obvious real world parallels. If it can be understood and be perfectly logical in the game world.

Give a shepherd boy the most powerful wand in the whole wide world and he’s NOT the greatest champion the world has. Figure out how to game-a-fy that and decay shouldn’t be too difficult to implement on top it it.

k2apa
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k2apa

Similar of this already happen in most F2P games.

In the form of “Cash Shop” where players can purchase certain skin/costume/items.

Most skin/ costumes are time limited, where perm ones are extremely rare in Loot Boxes.

Most F2P games these days add stat/bonuses on their skin/costumes, some even sell time-limited or level-limited equipment (which this is very P2W, however most game community now accept this and doesn’t seem to be arguing against P2W anymore) In fact, look at the most recent EA Star War… people are still buying into the game, being P2W doesn’t stop anyone from continuing buying into it, as such Game Companies will just keep on releasing P2W games as it makes them a lot more profit.

Personally I don’t want this as part of regular gameplay… it sucks a lot.

Only place this should be in is an alternative “hardcore” mode that’s on a separate server from normal game.

Estranged
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Estranged

Sounds interesting in theory, but I just see inventory issues being an issue.

Gotta save everything.

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draugris

It all depends on what it takes to get new gear. In PvP games with full loot, gear is not hard to get, most of the times it is crafted gear so you always have a spare set, in general not so much of a big deal but it can be somewhat annoying.

What i like about item decay is that it can make crafting valuable. In most mmo´s crafting is something, well, valuable to some degree during the level phase and then the best gear comes from raids or other instanced content. My hope is that MMO´s like CU will make crafting great again so crafters are able to produce something that people need and that will not last forever.

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Jeromai _

Can other people, directly or indirectly, cause me to lose items unexpectedly and non- consensually? No. Not playing that game. Not seriously, anyhow, or aiming to progress in any manner beyond a basic newbie tour/vacation just to see the sights. I do not play games to entertain or enable other peoples’ schadenfreude.

If the item loss is decay over time or a “rental” cost, or if the loss is fully my own fault versus insufficient preparation for the PvE environment I chose to wander into, then I might bite, as long as the time/effort cost of preparing for/replacing lost stuff isn’t too onerous or crippling.

Yocraig
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Yocraig

Not interested. Seems to me you’re switching from one treadmill to another one.

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Shannon Giblett

Well it could be a good way to keep in game currency levels down, but it could also be used in the same evil way Entropia Universe uses by charging real money for armour and making in game drops rare.

Xijit
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Xijit

yes

Xijit
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Xijit

yes

Xijit
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Xijit

yes, I know that this is a duplicate comment.

Xijit
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Xijit

one “yes” is not enough

Xijit
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Xijit

yes

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Cosmic Cleric

‘yes’ a bunch of times

So, if I understand you correctly, you are expressing a positive remark towards, the question at hand, yes?

Xijit
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Xijit

stop telling me I am posting comments to quickly: I know what I am doing!

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Utakata

That would work better if you had socks. o.O

That Guy
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That Guy

No thnx.

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Oleg Chebeneev

Sure. I actually installed mod for Skyrim that did exactly that. Ofc high grade items shouldnt decay fast. At minimum it should be a month of active usage

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Rees Racer

Right.

I get it that we play these PvE games with fantasy/sci-fi/steampunk et al settings…but my suspension of disbelief has some limits. If (in real life) I can go out with my father and fire his authentic Colt 1851 Navy Revolver (this sort of collectible firearm is not banned in my country) or have on display a fully functional longsword from the 16th century…it makes no sense whatsoever to have permanent item decay in a game.

Repairs and upkeep in the game are completely fine and proper, though…

1851_navy_lg.jpg
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Nate Woodard

I think I agree with the general consensus that pve game with full item decay wouldn’t be bad as long as gear is reasonably easy to replace. I think it’s what attracts me to games like Minecraft, Ark, etc. While you lose everything when you die, it’s not too hard to get geared back up again. And it’s also something to work for in a type of game where there’s not much else to work for.

hurbster
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hurbster

No, I would not.

Fnights
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Fnights

Is odd that you use Darkfall as an example, since DF is not a gear based game. I mean, in these open world rpg with full loot and item decay, gear is easily replaceable, you can craft it or buy from other players in seconds (there is an auction house to speed up the process), this is necessary for a player driven economy to work, very different from themeparks like WoW where you grind months to acquire the best gear and you never lose it.
This is the main difference from a themepark and a full sandbox, the first gear based, the second skill based with completely player driven economy, and the reason why i never play wow and its millions of clones.

Cadaver
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Cadaver

Yes, definitely.

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Alex Malone

Short Answer: Yes

Item decay, in my opinion, is only worth having when it is paired up with a full player economy. I use my items, they get worn, I replace them from a crafter. Its a great circle of interdependence, but also a great “balancer”. With a full player economy, you don’t need to grind out a raid for months to get the best gear, you can just buy it. You then have loads of options for buying stuff (crafters) and also for how you earn money (craft yourself, grind mobs, sell rare loot etc).

If it was item decay in a game with a loot-based economy, fuck that.

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Rolan Storm

Thanks for reminding what I did not like about SWG beside grind. And yes, I would – it’s just have to be good implementation. Still would consider that a hindrance, though.

I do not really see why such mechanic should exist. Most games make gear obsolete: either with new content addition, new set written into code or something like that. You throw old gear away anyway. And games that allow pieces to be indefinitely useful does not come to mind, actually.

Also please no item decay in BDO! I do not know about now, but back when I played it decay mechanic on top of BDO upgrade system would be overkill.

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I thought I was going to hate weapon decay in Breath of the Wild but I ended up kind of enjoying using new and different weapons all the time.

In an MMO released these days though? Hell no. It would just get cash shopped with “50% less item decay booster” and all that crap.

It could easily be done in a game like WoW, you get new weapon drops all the time the only problem would be the ilvl scaling which is just an issue of tweaking numbers and drop rates. I could have save my best weapon for raid bosses, and use a lesser weapon on trash.

I just wouldn’t trust any developer to not make it like BDOs upgrade system or some other similarly abused P2W item system. Even if a new MMO launched with it and it looked all perfect you can grantee that some day they would add cash shop “convenience” consumables.

Karma_Mule
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Karma_Mule

Like n I thought I’d find weapon decay really annoying, but I actually grew to like it. IMO the game would quickly become too easy and boring without it. You had to strategize when and where it was appropriate to use your stronger weapons instead of your weaker ones. Picking what to use became an important part of any fight rather than just always having your latest and greatest equipped.

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Alex Malone

weapon decay in Breath of the Wild was one of the main things that turned me off. I bought it on release day and put maybe 20 hours into during that first week, but haven’t been back. Having my weapon break every 5 minutes just sucked. The other thing that really turned me off was crafting all the food.

Rest of the game seemed great, but these two things massively detracted from the experience.

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Schmidt.Capela

It’s why I ignore that food exists and use cheats to remove gear decay.

Thanks God for video game hackers ;-)

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kgptzac

There seems to be an allergy regarding item decay in pve mmo: I point you to a (successful, I dare say) example on how this system works: check out Mabinogi.

In Mabinogi, equipment, largely, is completely separate from character progression. There is no such notion as something is “too precious to use” over there. If something is too expensive to repair, and you don’t want to take chances on losing maximum durability through repairing, then use a less expensive gear; problem solved.

Full item decay isn’t an outlandish concept (not as much as permadeath anyway). It has been done before, and it has been done well before, and I welcome more mmo that try it out (and do it well) in the future.

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Ket Viliano

It’s the old “gear attachment syndrome” left over from PnP D&D. You got used to getting most of your power from your gear, and then that gear rapidly came to define the character. Strip the gear, and the character becomes a hollow shell of his former self, a cripple. This then carried over to Diablo and WoW, and now here we are, stuck in a crowd of gear addicts.

IMHO, the need is to rehabituate an audience to the idea that gear can come and go, but the abilities stay with the character. I like ARK for this, if I die, and my gear is just too remote to recover, I just make new gear, or grab a backup set that I had already prepared.

Line
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Line

Yes.
I love rogue-likes, I do enjoy permadeath.

BUT.
That’s also a completely different perspective than what we get in MMOs: losing my raid gear, my legendary crafted gear, the griffin plushy given by my guild master?
Hell no, I don’t want item decay on those.

Item decay and permanent loss can work, but it would need to be similar to rogue-likes: you use gear/skills/whatever for a short period of time, 20-30mins, then you’re done and you trash it, do something else (or repeat if you want).

The important point being that it would completely separate gear and similar items from any form of progression, which would be permanent unlocks rather than linear “upgrades” lost in a sea of everything else getting upgraded into irrelevancy.

Could be a good way to escape the hamster wheel while also making play sessions in line with what is available to the masses, too.
Do your morning dungeon, unlock the new flooded version for later, dump your gear in the trash and tick one more box on your dungeon card to get your new miner’s hat, I dunno.
Something more relevant than +0.37% damage against newly updated +0.37% HP monsters.

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Toy Clown

It depends on its implementation. As Starbuck1771 stated below, SWG had it and it worked well for that MMO because of interdependence between crafters and adventurers, making all classes viable, social and fun. SWG had a robust, player-driven economy where players could become well-known and sought after for crafting. I loved it and would absolutely play a game that featured it in that way. (RIP the best kind of social interaction.)

Now if gear took a lot of time and effort to obtain, putting me in situations where I have to deal with player elitism and toxicity? No thank you. It then feels punishing and wasteful of my time.

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rafael12104

No. Nien. HeT, 没有, いいえ, קיין, Hapana, Ø

Yeah, the flavor of the game wouldn’t even matter.

You can keep that quicksand and throw corpse looting in there too.

Item wear and tear visually or otherwise? No problem. Repairs as part of a game mechanic? Cool. Full item decay as in, used up for ever, start over? Get out of here.

Lol. Makes me angry just thinking about it. I would be angry all the time playing such a PvE game.

comment image

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Hirku

Offtopic, but that GIF is so awesome I had to look it up and the full show is even more awesome:

Lots of other tribute shows from OSU marching band there, too.

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rafael12104

Awesome. Thanks for the link! I can’t imagine the hours involved in something like this.

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Hirku

Heh, seriously! The reason I researched was because I didn’t believe it was real.

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kgptzac

Mabinogi is a basically pve-only game. Its item decay system is well impleneted where weapons/armors can be repaired by npc, there’s a chance repair to fail and decreases max durability, hence they will wear out sooner or later, depend on how much it is used. Obviously this model will run into trouble on stuff like GW2’s legendary weapons where they take a ridiculous amount of grind to acquire, and luckily there’s nothing like that in Mabinogi (or at least when I played it).

I believe treating equipment as consumables is essential in a pve mmo that wants a decent crafting economy. Too bad not enough new MMOs are willing to take on a different path and have to stick to the norm.

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rafael12104

Cool. I’m glad you like it. But IMO it removes one grind and replaces with another.

You can have a great crafting economy without it. Repairs can be a part of that if you want more granularity.

But complete decay? Nah, it’s just another grind. Not for me.

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Croquantes

In a game like Star Wars Galaxies, if you had the money and you knew where to go, you could get great gear. Not only was crafting a viable full-time profession you could even make a living as a merchant, buying good gear from across the universe and reselling it.

Xijit
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Xijit

unless you get into crafting as your primary character occupation & then that “grind” becomes job security and the central focus of your gameplay.

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starbuck1771

Eliot did you never play Star Wars Galaxies? It started out with the same system. You could insure your items but they decayed. You could repair weapons and armor but they would lose durability in the process however when that durability hit a point it was useless gear. Item decay has been around for a very long time and I am fine with it.

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McGuffn

no

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zuldar

Probably not, unless there was some system in place to prevent the “too awesome to use” trope from taking affect. Getting better gear or crafting materials wouldn’t feel like that much of an accomplishment if I have to just put them in the bank in the event I really need them later.

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Greaterdivinity

Given my madbad casual nature and my proclivity for exploiting death runs to bypass time consuming areas packed with mobs/engage in unnecessarily risky encounters for the lulz…probably not. I’d try it, but I doubt my playstyle would be conducive to an enjoyable experience knowing that I’d probably need to spend most of my time rebuilding gear that I constantly wreck.

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Space Captain Zor

I sure would, and did, when I played SWG!

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Cosmic Cleric

To make decay work in modern MMOs you’d have to have a system where, in dungeons/raids, a armor/weapon (empty) “shell” would drop, and then the player would go to a craftsperson to make the empty shell a real, ready to use, armor/weapon item.

Then, over time, the armor/weapon would decay, but instead of it being destroyed when fully decayed, it can be “re-energized” by a substance that also drops from mobs, semi-rarely. You then have the craftsperson do the re-energizing of the armor/weapon item for the player.

Allow the craftsperson to apply skills and techniques to both making the item ready for use, as well as re-energizing the item, so that they have their own economy and demand.

Keep the system simple (ex.: just one kind of re-energizing substance), so that it’s not too much gear management for the players.

EDIT: By craftsperson, I really mean another player, but it could in theory also be a NPC.

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A Dad Supreme

THE DAILY GRIND: WOULD YOU PLAY A PVE GAME WITH FULL ITEM DECAY?

All day long and twice on Sunday before I’d play a PvP game with full corpse looting.

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Sally Bowls

No!

I want some semblance of permanence and progression in my MMO. If I want just a play and replay game, then I think there are games that do it better than MMOs: e.g., WoWs. Or OW, LoL, …

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Thomas Zervogiannis

The permanence/progression can always come in the form of character skills, or achievements, or many other ways.

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Kayweg

Nevermind the item decay, but did you just say PvE game ?
Yes please !

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Ashfyn Ninegold

Only if crafting were the main source of gear improvements and repair. If the gear system was tied to dungeons and raids, then no, not interested. If you can craft good gear or gear close-enough-for-government-work to group/raid drops than, yes.

Would never happen, of course. Devs are wedded to group content and as such will always rely on dungeons and raids as the primary content. Take away dungeon/raid gear progression and few players would do that content, ripping the bottom out of the development cycle. Raid gear progression is the Holy Grail of MMOs.

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nobleeinherjar

Such a system would work (and has worked) in MMOs like Ultima Online where community was a central focus of the game, where weapons and armor (for the most part) were mundane even if they were exceptionally crafted. At least, that’s how it used to work. I know it’s a bit different these days. I was going to say EVE is another example, but I don’t think it has item/ship decay. Although that actually could be a fun feature, maybe, depending. (“Don’t worry! She’ll hold together. .. You hear me, baby? Hold together.”)

In MMOs with a gear treadmill, I think such a system would make the end-game grind that much more tedious. It could even add in a bit of item-management anxiety as players might feel the need to keep extra sets of weaker gear around because they wouldn’t necessarily want to run lower-level content in their best gear and risk some permanent durability loss. That anxiety is a necessary evil in games like UO and EVE (“never fly anything you can’t afford to lose”), but I don’t see it having a place in themeparks and guided tours.

The question itself highlights a few flaws baked into most modern MMOs. Like the fact that there is such a thing as a gear treadmill and the current definition of “end-game” in a lot of MMOs. In general, at least. Some MMOs, despite my personal dislike of both of those things, use them very well.

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Ket Viliano

In EvE, when ships are destroyed, they are lost permanently, along with about half of all the stuff that was on or in them. It serves to make sure there will always be a market for newly crafted gear.

There is item decay in EvE, but like many features, it is trivial or deprecated. Getting blown up or blowing the other guys ship up is where it’s at.

Richard de Leon III
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Richard de Leon III

Only if the gear had no effect on your power level aside from base weapon damage.

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Kevin Smith

I would have to say nope I wouldn’t play it. Not because it isn’t a good system for some game types. I wouldn’t play it because then the game is basically a gear management sim. You would spend most of your time just replacing your gear. I play games to quest and get away from the real world, to just have fun. Do not need to feel like playing a game is a job were I need to constantly looking at my gear every other fight because it might break. I do not worry about having the bis gear now even in games like WoW. Overall I want to relax in games and not have systems that force me to constantly have to rethink my entire build.

Alyn
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Alyn

This would work if an mmo valued true craftsmanship as a driver for the economy. Thus, yes, we’d need crafting to exist in a pve environment where total decay happens. However, repair can be an integral part of the crafting system, or item revitalization, in some way.

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silverlock

If it was a sand box where the gear is crafted then sure. If it was a theme park where you had a 1% chance of the gear dropping off a specific dungeon boss then no.

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Bryan Correll

Agreed. Too much luck involved in getting good gear couldn’t work with permanent decay. But as part of ensuring the ‘demand’ part of an in-game economy it absolutely works.

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AtticLion

If it was done well, done in service of the feel of the game play, instead of being some bullshit attempt at economy balancing/lootbox selling. Then sure. Why not?

Though it would require some super bloody drastic changes in how these games are made. Items could no longer be the end all reward for doing stuff, for instance. Because losing stuff that players had puts loads and loads of effort into would just create a huge fun vacuum the moment they lost said stuff.

But then, isn’t a swift kick in the pants what the industry needs? Since so many of us are sick to our back teeth with WoW-templated bollocks?

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Zora

Short answer: no

Long answer: nope, not even if you pay me

If there’s one thing I like about mmorpgs, it’s the very unique feature of permanence. Not simply persistence but actual permanence. Gear resets among expansions is the only thing I tolerate, an even then, barely so.

Please respect my time invested, I really really value it. Thank yoooou <3

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Dwarf-Orc

Why not, if it’s fun. Wouldn’t be fun to shoehorn it into a WoW-like game, but if you design your game around it, why not. You can make a good game out of anything. But attachment to items is really good for monetization, so a game like this is probably not going to happen.

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Rumm

It would have to be decay through player action, not just arbitrary decay because reasons. Even then I’m not sure if I’m a huge fan of the idea. I generally think of items as rewards for completion of content, and in PVE games, there’s usually limited loot to disperse amongst multiple players. To be randomly stripped of your gains whilst other people are still trying to get their first piece would just feel punishing. Maybe crafting could alleviate that, but resources in guilds are still usually funneled to players who make the most impact, so meh, I don’t know about this one.

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IronSalamander8 .

Not a fan of the idea. There are too many treadmills in MMOs as it is now, I wouldn’t want more. Some games pull off something similar that works, such as Minecraft’s tools, but that game has a different focus than most MMOs and you’re generally just remaking the same quality tool (i.e. stone pick to replace a broken stone pick) for busy work and saving the really good stuff for when it’s needed.

Not saying it can’t work at all, just not something I’d enjoy.

plasmajohn
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plasmajohn

One of the (few) things I liked about EVE was that gear (ships) really weren’t all that important. Yes, they defined your capabilities but they didn’t define your potential and they were readily available. Best of all it made crafting relevant at all tiers. Even better it meant all ship classes were relevant depending on what you liked to do.

IMO the gear progression curve is fundamentally flawed. IMO it would be much better to upgrade the avatar and let gear define basic capability. Another side benefit is that it takes a lot of pain out of cosmetics.

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CapnLan

Sure I would. In a way I already do. Item loss is a basically a staple in many space games. Don’t fly what you can’t afford as it’s all fire and shrapnel if you screw up. Even if I have massive, expensive ships all decked out in top gear, I still keep a hangar of cheaper disposable ships to keep my funds going. No need to bring my big guns when a cheaper alternative can get the job done.

This could be applied to fantasy style PvE games but would require a rework of the core gameplay to support a disposable item economy. There should be powerful gear, but nothing like a legendary uber sword that has a 0.01% drop rate from a raid. In fact I don’t think raids would be a part of this game at all. Getting that uber gear is a big draw to raiding. If you could lose all that uber gear with one mistake, I’m not so sure anyone would bother with raids. I think it would have to shift to being purely an open world game where players can band together against NPC factions to either capture land or maybe build/defend cities or villages or something like that.

This could be also lend itself to a resurgence of crafting as having crafters to pump out new gear and repair damaged gear would be in high demand. They could also take a page out of the space games book and maybe have a sort of insurance system for gear. If your sword is damaged beyond repair or lost in battle then you can recoup some of your losses as you had it insured and then use that insurance money to buy a new one from an NPC shop or a higher grade one from a crafter.

Well, that’s just a very rough concept of how it could go. It would obviously need more thought put into it than that. The bottom line is that yes, I would play a game like that but it entirely depends on how it’s implemented.

plasmajohn
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plasmajohn

In fact I don’t think raids would be a part of this game at all. Getting that uber gear is a big draw to raiding. If you could lose all that uber gear with one mistake, I’m not so sure anyone would bother with raids.

That’s a common misconception. Gear progression is only part of raiding. Learning the fights and the coordination needed to deal with the mechanics is a factor. Eventually between gear and improved skill/tactics/strategy the boss dies. It’s a puzzle to solve not to mention that there’s a big social aspect to it.

Destructible gear means it must be disposable. Nobody would or should use uber gear anymore. Gear progression would be replaced with something else. Additional skills or implants or soul sigils or whatever.

The neat thing is that makes it trivial to separate mode (raid, dungeon, pvp) power creep from open world and other modes. And soul bound items can finally go the way of the dodo.

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Tobasco da Gama

The stat checks most games use to enforce “progression” for raids are the worst thing about raid design. Throwing those treadmills in the trash would do the genre a lot of good, IMO.

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Schmidt.Capela

Devs don’t usually remove gear checks because it would allow the top raid teams, with well trained players and the resources to review the fights and rapidly iterate about them, to beat just about all new content within hours of it being released. Gear grinds and lockouts are used to make grind time more important than skill in beating the content, and thus to reduce the difference in how fast hardcore raiders and common players beat the content.

I particularly don’t see an issue in allowing pros to beat the content lightning-fast, mind, particularly if that would also reduce the amount of grind common players have to do.

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Tobasco da Gama

I mean, the top raid guilds already do beat new content within hours of release. For games with PTRs, they usually beat the new content before release.

CapnLan
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CapnLan

I suppose that’s true. Gear could be replaced with something else. I personally don’t raid and don’t see the draw to raiding at all so I can defer that point to those who do.

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Utakata

No…that does not sound like an attractive feature that would make my pigtails want go out and get it. In fact, it would most likely have the opposite effect. :(

borghive
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borghive

You never stop grinding gear though in most themeparks anyway, it is basically the same thing.

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Utakata

Err…this would add another layer if not dimension of grind to acquiring gear. So no, not really. And no thank you.

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mistressbrazen

Absolutely not. I have no problem with repairable gear, but if I have used my very limited play time to work towards achieving some high level gear, then I don’t want that accomplishment removed through game mechanics. If I’ve leveled a character up and geared her and that gear is destroyed or removed, it is extremely unlikely I would put the effort into redoing all of the work. Looking at you Funcom…..

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ogged451

Depends. DAoC used to have this and it made crafting a worthwhile occupation. On the other hand, if this would be introduced to a game like SWL where you have a massive grind before your items become usable, then “FU”(ncom).

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Ravven

I wouldn’t invest time or effort in an MMO like that – what would be the point? I would feel the same about a game that made you lose a significant amount of XP on death, because it would change the way that I played. I like taking risks and occasionally biting off more than I can chew. If I lost a level each time? I probably wouldn’t do it. Same thing with item degradation, what would be the point of running content in hopes of getting better gear, when that gear was just going to decay into uselessness? I don’t want things handed to me, I just want to hold on to what I have…which is why I’ve never been tempted to play Darkfall. :D

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