EVE Online expands its community info website

Want the latest information on EVE Online in one easy-to-navigate space? Now there’s a website for that.

EVE’s new and improved community website got a little larger this week as it brought four key departments under one roof. Now players can head over to the site to easily find the latest game news, lore, dev blogs, and patch notes without a lot of hunting around. Other MMO sites, take note!

CCP said that all sections of the old website haven’t been moved over to the new community site just yet. These sections include the in-character world news, the CMS Portal, and the Alliance Tournament Portal. The studio said that those should be moved over the “next few months.”

Source: EVE Online
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Nosy Gamer

I found the opening paragraph of the newest dev blog listed on the new site pretty sweet:

“A MESSAGE FROM FRANÇOIS BOUCHY, MAXIME MARMIER AND OLIVER TURNER – MEMBERS OF MICHEL MAYOR’S TEAM IN SWITZERLAND.

In July 2017, all 176,802 light curves obtained by the CoRoT space mission were injected into EVE Online with the aim of detecting new transiting exoplanets. At the astronomy department of the Geneva University, a first analysis of the 44.4 million classifications provided by 77,709 players in 190 days is underway. This is a staggering number of classifications; for comparison, the Zooniverse Galaxy Zoo Project received 50 million classifications during its first year. Hundreds of light curves, previously thought to have no transits, have been identified by the pilots of EVE Online as new transit candidates with a very high consensus. It is important to note that a high consensus does not mean the events are new planets. So, these new events are presently being analyzed in more detail by the astronomers of Geneva University and cross-checked with other astronomical databases.”