Chronicles of Elyria eschews ‘silly stat-fest’ MMO gear in favor of ‘dramatic realism’

Now that Chronicles of Elyria has got a handle on its flexible character creation system, the team has switched over to working in the area of inventory management and equipment. The developers looked at some of their favorite inventory systems as inspiration for Elyria’s model.

“We are aiming for a relatively realistic feel to equipment and inventory,” the team said. “You can only carry what you can realistically carry, so no wearing eight backpacks or putting great swords in a belt pouch. That said, the type and number of bags or containers you have are quite flexible.”

The team also said that gear won’t be a ‘silly stat-fest” but will provide protection while a player’s skill will power offense. Even changing gear will take time, considering that Elyria’s models will have multiple layers of clothing.

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33 Comments on "Chronicles of Elyria eschews ‘silly stat-fest’ MMO gear in favor of ‘dramatic realism’"

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draugris

I am sceptical, realism in mmos tends to make it boring and usually no quality of life features. Tbh i play games to escape for a time the reality of life and i have no interest to have it inside a game.

OverdriveActive
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OverdriveActive

I worry about stuff like this because it usually means playing melee is horrible. Realism means the guy with the fireball fries the guy wearing the metal pressure cooker. To address the realism in inventory management, if that means that every outing you can carry at max one potion then things will get tedious quick.

My enjoyment of MMOs thrives on being able to hit a stride and sense of ‘flow’ while out in the world. If every outing becomes a massively dangerous undertaking where you kill one guy – back out – restock wherever your base is – lose wanted status or whatever and then go back in I can’t see myself playing this long. I’m all for having more consequences but realism is not a shape I’d want that in. Of course, that’s speculation from a small seed of what they’re communicating but using realism as a design driver conjures up those concerns.

Then again, maybe this game isn’t aimed at me and some people want to play an MMO that’s Thief-like. Suppose this’ll go on my “keep a cautious eye on it” bucket.

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Syran

It’s all just a matter of game design. You can easily make a game with “realistic” inventory systems and combat without making them tedious or imbalanced. For example by distributing less loot, requiring fewer items in general, having longer cast times for magic, et cetera. Whether or not that’s something the mainstream wants is a different question altogether. ;)

OverdriveActive
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OverdriveActive

Absolutely, they may find a way to do it without getting tedious. I have yet to see an implementation that fits both the “realistic” and “convenient” categories. It’s concerning to see them crow about realism for a system that will be so core and often used because it’ll likely put obstacles between what I want to do (eg. stock myself up, move stuff around, carry loot as and when it drops) and how they want me to do it (eg. find a bag that fits the 2×4 square of an item or match my item’s “large” tag to a bag with the same). That’s the concern on my end really, adding fluff to a system under the banner of realism that ultimately hurts the purpose it’s supposed to fulfill. Perhaps I should just stick to things that already exist :P

Loyheta
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Kickstarter Donor
Loyheta

-Backs The Repopulation- Well that was an awful waste. Not backing anymore

-Backs Star Citizen- Well… maybe I shouldn’t have spent that much money on something I probably won’t play much, assuming it comes out. I think backing things isn’t a good idea.

-Backs Chronicles of Elyria- Man when are they going to show some gameplay… I’m not backing things anymore

-Backs Ashes of Creation- … please don’t let me down…

Loyheta
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Loyheta

Crapping on KS games aside… I really hope I can see some gameplay from this soon. I felt really nervous after they dropped spatialOS and the sheer lack of gameplay footage is nerve-racking. I do like more RP friendly game elements to an extent so this should be interesting.

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2Ton Gamer

It’s almost hypocritical to act as though you have these morals about your game, but then have no problem fleecing your backers for more money (ie; the monthly sales of digital items for a game that does yet exist) because you have not exactly been nailing it in the “do what you said you would do with the money from your original KS” department. I would love for this game to materialize and be what it has promised, but for now I’m ready for more action and less talk.

You can also stop sending me emails about paying off my layaway because I will not sink another dime into this game until I know for sure this game will really happen. Your no refunds policy prevents me from fully trusting you guys at Soulbound.

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Toy Clown

The development team seem to be forward-thinking. On top of that, they embrace roleplay and immersion at this stage. I’ve watched lots of games promise to keep the integrity of the game vision, but give into whiny players that demand … whatever … after release. For example, BDO devs stated there would never be immersion-breaking outfits and neon colors introduced into their world back in the alpha days, and look what they did: Outfits that make absolutely no sense to a gritty and harsh world combined with colors that also don’t fit the landscape. It was truly one of the biggest letdowns I’ve experienced from a game’s devs, right behind the promise of housing after GW2’s release.

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Life_Isnt_Just_Dank_Memes

this game is a sub so as long as players cant buy their way to unrealistic inventory etc and it’s 100% earnable in game i am cool with it. i am done with cash shop+subbed games unless they are doing things leaps and bounds above and beyond what f2p or b2p games with cash shops are doing and i have yet to see one that is.

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Brown Jenkin

I love the concept, we’ll see how it works out in practice. Anything is a good alternative to the now traditional MMO vertical progression leveling and gear treadmill though.

styopa
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styopa

I love the concept, first because it’s breaking one of those antiquated “nobody even questions it” paradigms in MMOs: you get your stats from your gear.
Second, I like it because it’s logical – a master swords person with a mediocre/crappy sword is still going to crush a newb with excalibur.

Going to be interesting to see how it’s implemented. Talk is cheap.

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Brother Maynard

a master swords person with a mediocre/crappy sword is still going to crush a newb with excalibur.

Ah, but the newb has come to his possesion thanks to one of the strange women lying in ponds and distributing swords and thus, thanks to this watery tart, will have a whole army at his disposal, galloping faster than an African swallow and prepared to do the king Newb’s bidding.

Even Denis knows the master swordsman may well win the argument, but he’ll still get beaten up.

Blazing Coconut
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Kickstarter Donor
Blazing Coconut

This game hadn’t been on my radar, but this article makes me at least take notice. I find gear grind to be the least enjoyable aspect of a game. The fact that they’re willing to buck silly MMO traditions makes me want to at least take notice and try it out.

Whether they can pull it off remains to be seen, but this certainly caught my attention.

Here’s to hoping!

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Brown Jenkin

Yep, like I’d heard of it but just sort of blew it off, this definitely makes me reconsider. Gear grind is no doubt one of the suckiest aspects of MMOs and it unfortunately combines with several other crappy aspects to ruin what might otherwise be lots of fun. Amazingly Chronicles of Elyria just got added to my watch list :)

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Thomas Zervogiannis

Even changing gear will take time, considering that Elyria’s models will have multiple layers of clothing.

I am curious and a bit skeptical to see how they will implement it, whether the immersion and realism it offers will be justifiable compared to how much of a nuisance it will be and whether it will feel frustrating in terms of controls-UI. A simplistic approach would just result in a purely frustrating mechanic that offers nothing in return.

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Jack Kerras

I don’t believe that’s completely accurate.

People 100% definitely take advantage of everything they possibly can, and you can bet that if there isn’t some kind of restriction to equipment, they’ll have three armor sets (one for cutting, one for bashing, one for piercing) on and stance-dance their way through combat, only showing the most effective side to each given monster in a PvE fight, or other player in a PvE fight.

That is -exactly- the kind of bullshit MMO folks do. You see someone coming with an ax, you hit your ‘slashy’ macro and all your armor simultaneously leaps out of your ass before axman can close the distance.

I’m good with keeping it silghtly less simple than all that.

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Thomas Zervogiannis

See my comment below, I got that covered:

Disabling super-easy changing of gear might be there to limit one’s ability to adapt on the fly according to their opponents equipment. This can be good or bad depending on the design of the game – as a counter-example, some might argue that GW2’s change of gear and skills on the fly while in WvW adds an extra layer of depth that some find fun.

Whether this is a good limitation depends on:
(a) How it fits with the rest of the game design
(b) How they will implement it
(c) Player taste. I am with you with having gear be an impactful choice, but some players might find that on-the-fly switching interesting (I agree it always needs to be somehow limiting though, in the counter-example you need to be OOC to do that).

For example, I am worried with this “multiple layers of clothing” remark. When you are completely out-of-combat, like in a city (where gear switching should be quick and smooth), the burden is on the UI designers to make it so it is not super annoying and clicky-clicky when you want to change something in sub-layer 2 because you need to remove something in the outer layer – or to re-remove stuff and wait again a couple of progress bars because you forgot to swap a piece in a sub-layer.

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Thomas Zervogiannis

Another similar example of annoying UI choices, particularly with layering, is EVE and ships/containers: even when in a station you cannot do particular actions (like selling an item) without taking it out of the container, or your ship, and repackaging it first. This does not really add to the game play, only extra clicks and annoyances – you are already in total safety, in a “quiet” state.

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Reht

Kind of makes me glad i was able to resist the temptation to back this. While i really like some of their concepts and ideas, things like this just seem like major inconveniences that won’t enrich a game for me. Going to be interesting to see if it appeals to the average gamer who just wants lore + loot + hack’n’slash.

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Hanthos Taal

CoE is being developed for a niche audience that is kind of tired of the “average” that litters the current gaming landscape.

styopa
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styopa

I think it’s actually a commercially sensible decision to NOT to try to be the “next WoW killer!”…the question is, of course, if the target niche a) buys it, and b) is big enough to be commercially viable.

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Thomas Zervogiannis

I do not mean to say that the concept is necessarily bad. It all depends on how they will implement it. As far as I am concerned, all these mechanics are good if there is a reasoning behind them. Immersion and realism is the icing on the cake, but the game play comes first. Weight limits for example might be important in making tactical decisions on what to carry and what options to have while on the move. Disabling super-easy changing of gear might be there to limit one’s ability to adapt on the fly according to their opponents equipment. This can be good or bad depending on the design of the game – as a counter-example, some might argue that GW2’s change of gear and skills on the fly while in WvW adds an extra layer of depth that some find fun.

It all depends on whether it will be well-designed and implemented, which is why I am skeptical. If it is many annoying clicks and a progress bar that wastes time then no thanks. But it does not need to be like that.

taradyne
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taradyne

Your points are on point. There will be weight limits and players will have to make decisions about what to carry and how to prepare.

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Lethality

That type of gamer is not who this is game is for though.

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Reht

Thank you captain obvious. I have no problem with what it is and it’s direction, i just know it’s not the game for me and that’s ok. But it still begs the question: Will it be able to survive without hooking at least some of them? And that’s a relevant question for any of the niche-focused games in the development pipeline right now, not just CoE.

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Hanthos Taal

Companies that have abandoned the need to chase WoW numbers and accept that they can be successful without mass-market populations will do fine.

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Reht

Can they? We haven’t seen it happen yet. I hope we do though. Going a different direction with a game and accepting a smaller part of the pie versus being able to keep the lights on are two very different things. I just hope that these niche games can keep their identity and not have to sacrifice their tenets, whether they appeal to me or not, if they have to make changes to appeal to a wider audience to keep the doors open.

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Lethality

Do you need to be rude?

It will hook some of them, those that realize they do enjoy this kind of engagement and realism.

The rest will go back to whatever it is they do for fun. And that’s exactly how games need to be. Make it great for those that like it, do not accommodate those that won’t anyway.

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Reht

I felt like your response was snarky, i apologize.