Camelot Unchained ‘just barely’ on track for Beta 1

The Camelot Unchained team is racing against its self-imposed deadline to get the MMO’s first beta test out the door on July 4th — and by the sound of it, it’s going to be a close thing. “We are still on track, but just barely,” the team reported. “We had to spend a lot of time on our compliance with the GDPR policies as well as some other game studio stuff (all good!).”

This push means that a lot got done this past week, including the reinstatement of the forums, updates to the Beta 1 refining process, work on the beta’s progression testing, and installation of debugging tools.

Of course, if you’re a visual creature, you’d be far more interested in seeing one of the new boat concepts, possible town art assets, and a couple of character model renders of the male Viking Mjölnir and female Arthurian Black Knight.

“I’m particularly looking forward to the next several weeks, as we get players moving between islands and scenarios, testing out all our hard work,” the devs said.

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14 Comments on "Camelot Unchained ‘just barely’ on track for Beta 1"

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Schlag Sweetleaf

Keep on keeping on CSE;)

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Mark Jacobs

Great work, as usual.

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Armsbend

GDRP’s unintended consequences in real time. I’ve personally enjoyed watching just how inadequate governments have become against a smarter and more agile corporation in the past half decade. They still wield a great amount of power but the fact that the giants almost seem to be playing them into their own hands will lead to an interesting turn of events in the near term.

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Mark Jacobs

The sad part is that the big targets of the GDPR are the ones who can most afford the lawyers, time, and well, carrots (jobs in EU) to deal with the fallout of the GDPR, including lawsuits. Small companies like ours would have to spend time/money that we don’t really have to truly defend an action against us. That’s why we have spent all the time and money we have to date, in order to put us in a situation where not only are we GDPR-compliant but if something really bad happened, the really sensitive data is on a non-networked machine that is not connected to the Internet.

I do think that some of what the EU is doing is good and true. OTOH, the regulations were way too vague on certain things so companies like ours had to make some decisions based on the recitals. A lot of companies are doing things that are not consistent with the recitals and only might be consistent with how the GDPR is applied. We didn’t take any chances so we just went with the more conservative and protective stance whenever possible.

I’m hoping I’m wrong about this but I’m really worried for our European gaming brethren if the GDPR is seen as a way to tax the Internet, and not just to protect Data Subjects (GDPR terminology for humans on the Internet). As always, time will tell.

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Armsbend

Yup that is what I was referring to. Companies like FB, Alphabet, etc are having their competition beaten away for them. I get why they did it but at the same time I believe they rushed it out without thinking for once the long term, or short term for that matter, consequences.

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Dean Greenhoe

My guess is GDPR took a big bite of the studios buffer development time. This included a re-factor [my words] of the games forums. No small feat for a small studio where everyone already has plenty of work to do.

As a “true” beta I hope people understand that what they will be testing may not be what they are expecting based on experiences from other games 90% complete games’s beta. There is a long way still to go.

What is NOT “Just Barely” is the amount of rvr fun people will have testing the beta. :)

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Mark Jacobs

400+ hours and counting. A lot of those are mine and some key engineers including Andrew. Not what we wanted to do but it was what we had to do.

As to people understanding, some will, some won’t but it won’t be because we haven’t warned them, again and again. That’s also why we are still offering refunds, so nobody can say that they were mislead/misinformed and lost money because of it.

It’s been an interesting year, that’s for sure.

Alyn
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Alyn

Thanks Mark.
I am a big fan of what you are attempting here. I am beginning to feel that the gamers out there are being patient and are pulling for the City State team!

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Mark Jacobs

The vast majority of our Backers are certainly being patient and I think other RvR-interested gamers are hoping we succeed. As I always say, we haven’t proved anything yet other than we can make a great tech demo. The true test is coming, the progression from Beta 1 to Beta 2. By then, the game has to be fun, be stable, and have a clear path to LIVE. We won’t go into Beta 2 until then.

Thanks for your support as well as everybody who wants us to succeed, whether they are Backers (or now, CSECitizens) or not!

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Tandor

I’m glad that Mark Jacobs is taking the time to get things right before launching the Beta, it’s difficult to overstate the importance of quality over timing where new releases are concerned, especially as there are plenty of decent MMORPGs out there, which is a limiting factor where creating new ones is concerned. The market is arguably already saturated and players simply aren’t willing to pay a viable rate to play new titles that are incredibly expensive to develop (see the recent article here on that) unless they are absolutely top notch, and then it’s debatable! There’s an additional risk therefore in nailing one’s flag so firmly to the subscription pole!

The main issue these days seems to be with PvP-centric MMOs where there are always conflicting views because by their very definition every time people log in 50% of them will die, and that will always be seen as being down to the quality of the game rather than the player’s own skill level!

One subject I’d be interested to see form the basis of a MOP article relates to whether MMORPGs are an appropriate, let alone the best, type of game for PvP. I know a lot of PvPers reserve their PvP for FPS titles, and with only a few exceptions those MMORPGs that are PvP-centric tend to be very niche titles while those MMORPGs that combine PvP with PvE tend to be very toxic and prone to massive criticism from the PvPers who often feel they’re getting short-changed compared with PvEers when it comes to new content, while the PvEers blame every skill and balancing change on the PvPers.

So is it realistic any more to look to MMORPGs for PvP? If so, is it best to opt for niche titles like CU that are PvP-centric, and in the absence of meaningful PvE content can they fairly be called MMORPGs?

As always, I wish CU well, but I can’t help wondering whether it really can beat the jinx that befell every previous “This is going to be DAoC2” new title? One of those was developed by Mark Jacobs so his involvement this time doesn’t guarantee anything, and I seriously wonder whether without knowing it the old DAoC crowd have now moved on and can never really capture the old feeling again, no matter how good a game CU turns out to be.

As a PvEer who misses Warhammer Online very much, not least because that was one game that was able to tempt me into PvP through its PvE, I’ll be interested to see what the PvPers make of the CU Beta when they finally get their hands on it – good luck as always!

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Mark Jacobs

Thanks, it’s going to be an interesting few months, that’s for sure!

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rafael12104

Hang in there, CU!

I’m not concerned about CU’s schedule because they are focused on making the game as great as it can possibly be. So, meh. Kudos if the schedule remains intact. Kudos if you need a few days more to get everything ready for Beta.

Either way, I’m just happy to see the game is being realized.

Because, let’s be honest, MMORPGs this year are off to a bad start.

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Mark Jacobs

Thanks. Our investors are behind me in the right way (not with daggers in hand) so if we’re late with Beta 1, nobody will panic nor be upset. We’ve kept them apprised of everything going on in the studio, just as we do with our CSECitizens, so it’s all good.

Do I want to launch Beta July 4th, yep. Will I allow CU to launch July 4th if it’s not ready? Nope, we won’t launch, I’ll deal with the fallout and we’ll just move forward. The good news is that we still haven’t hit any big problem like we did the last time we were working towards Beta 1. If we’re late this time, it shouldn’t be by much. We were running around the multiple placeholder island late Friday so that’s a very good sign. I also saw a video of Andrew’s new building changes in action and it was pretty damn impressive. We’re still sending too much info down the pipe, but it’s smaller than it was by a huge amount, and things were operating quite smoothly even with something like 500K blocks laid out in the worst possible way for our renderer/network code. That was a very, very good sign.

So, we still have a little less than a month to go but as of Friday, still on track.

Thanks as always Rafael!

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yoh_sl

Agreed. With the current fallout of games like Bless, you begin to realize that there is a world of difference between being done quick, and being done right.
Good things take time. (although that is a position I’ve always held tbh)
So please take as long as it takes. Once beta comes around, and I can begin testing regularly in earnest, I throw some more money your way.