broadsword online

Spun out of EA as one of the last remnants of Mythic Entertainment, Broadsword now runs Ultima Online and Dark Age of Camelot.

Leaderboard: What do you expect out of live MMORPG events in 2017?

Earlier this month, Black Desert GMs ran a live in-game event. I was super excited to hear about something like that in a newer MMORPG until I saw some of the complaints. Apparently, the event amounted to a “mysterious stranger” played by what I assume is a GM, who arrived on Valencia 6 and started “gathering souls,” i.e., murdering everyone in sight with a scythe, until players took him down.

To me, that’s not really a live event. That’s the sort of obnoxious thing GMs used to do in classic EverQuest, inhabit sand giants and just start massacring newbs (less funny back when deaths cost you experience).

I’m jaded; I’ve seen live events in Ultima Online for so long that my bar is way higher than just powertripping GMs on a god character. I expect a long-running storyline, discussion, choices, a purpose to the interaction that elevates it above, well, a world boss. What do you expect out of live MMORPG events in 2017?

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The Daily Grind: How old should an MMO be to consider classic servers?

Last week, Justin and I were chit-chatting about legacy servers in MMORPGs when he said that Trion should really get moving on classic servers for RIFT. My first reaction was what, really, that game is way too young to need vanilla servers! But then I remembered playing on Ultima Online emulators within a year or two of launch. RIFT, which came out in 2011, isn’t exactly old, but it’s not brand-new either. It’s old enough to have weathered a lot of changes, some of which were probably wide-ranging and contentious enough to have created plenty of players who’d rather see them undone and the game returned to a more primordial state.

What’s the cut-off – or is there one? How old should an MMO be to consider classic servers? And if age isn’t the determining factor, what exactly is?

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Ultima Online suspends ‘advisor’ program ahead of F2P conversion

Back in 2014, Ultima Online revived its classic “counselor” program as a new “advisor” program — essentially, it roped in community-minded, expert players to serve as official guides for new players and intermediaries between the support team and the playerbase, sporting very light GM powers (like being able to help people get unstuck). But in the game’s latest newsletter, Broadsword says it’s suspending that program – at least temporarily.

“I am looking into revising how the Advisor program operates and I am also looking for dedicated people that want to help others, so when we publish Endless Journey we can also restart the Advisor program,” Producer Bonnie “Mesanna” Armstrong told players today. “This is not meant to be anything negative to the current Advisors and most of them will return if they would like to.”

Endless Journey, of course, is the upcoming free-to-play conversion for the game slated for publish 99 next spring. And one of the game systems due for revamp is the in-game town crier system.

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EA has put the kibosh on a player-run Battlefield emulator – are MMOs next?

We don’t cover the Battlefield games much on Massively OP, but this particular story caught my attention anyway because of the company and subject involved. According to a piece on Gamasutra, EA has effectively stymied a player-run effort to resurrect several Battlefield games, including Battlefield Heroes, as de facto emulators with online services, which have attracted significant fan support.

Revive Network says it was issued a polite request – not a formal cease-and-desist demand – by EA’s legal team, casually asking the site-runners to put an end to distrbuting the clients that make the resurrection possible.

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Massively Overthinking: Is open-world housing really a ‘failed’ MMORPG experiment?

Massively OP’s Justin Olivetti has a provocative article on his personal gaming blog, Bio Break, this week on MMORPG housing.

“I once again wonder why open world housing is this holy grail that some players and developers seem hellbent on chasing,” he writes. “It’s an ideal, a beautiful mirage couched in the notion of players inhabiting the very world they play, allowing them to stroll through neighborhoods of fellow adventurer’s homes and basking in the connectivity of it all. Yet it’s a failed experiment, one that is proven time and again to have far more drawbacks than benefits.” After listing off his complaints with the mechanic, he ultimately concludes that “we simply don’t need fixed open world housing, even in sandboxes.”

But being Justin, he also asked for feedback on why the joys are worth the drawbacks – and how to fix the system so it works instead of running off the rails. That’s just what we’ll do in this week’s Overthinking. Is he right about not needing this type of housing? And if not, how would you fix open world housing?

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Crowfall demos more action harvesting, starts taking guild name reservations

Crowfall isn’t content to make gathering as dull and repetitive as in other MMOs, which is why the team is putting great stock in its so-called “action harvesting.” This system has come under further refinement following its introduction a few weeks back, and the devs were on hand this week to demonstrate why you’ll need to be on your toes when you’re cutting down that tree or scrounging through that bush.

One of these refinements is the addition of “energetic harvesting,” a skill that uses the new action pips to trigger buffs during the process. Players were also shown several of the optional disciplines that a character can equip, such as Logger, Quarryman, Lookout, Hoarder, and Survivalist.

ArtCraft informed the community yesterday that it has started to send out instructions for guilds to reserve their names. “Hey, Crowfall Kickstarter backers: Watch your inbox for guild name reservation info. Newer backers can reserve guild names in November,” the studio posted.

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Ultima Online patches in Halloween, 20-year vet rewards, and Christmas

Publish 98.2 is live in Ultima Online this week with… Christmas?

Yep! Halloween is already live in the game, but the latest patch set up the Christmas rewards, though they won’t actually begin triggering until December. There are some pretty nice trinkets in the bundle, including a jewelry box that will essentially cut down piles of 500 jewels unto a single lockdown.

As the game’s just turned 20 years old, it’s also released a new set of veteran rewards, including several new statuettes, an enchanted writing desk, a koi pond, new titles, and for accounts that have been active the full 20 years, a ridable ethy serpentine dragon.

In addition to the return of the game’s artisan festival and tweaks to the taming mechanics, UO’s also recently seen a round of anniversary gifts for every subber and a ton of Halloween events, including the a special dungeon mechanic, the trick-or-treating event, in-game pumpkin carving, and extra-haunted graveyards. The one by my house better not spawn crap on my lawn!

Of course, this is all just the appetizer for next year’s main course: the free-to-play switchover.

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MMO Halloween: Dark Age of Camelot, Hearthstone, and Heroes of the Storm

Trick or treat, smell my feet, give me something good to… play?

Halloween 2017 continues unabated in online games, so let’s see what goodies and surprises are in store for players today. First off, there’s the return of Dark Age of Camelot and its haunted festival. There’s pumpkin patches, encounters with the Mournful King, and a ghostly harvest quest to complete.

MOBA’s more your speed? Drag your corpse over to Heroes of the Storm and its Hallow’s End holiday. You can earn some special rewards, such as a headless horseman spray, simply by playing a handful of games during the event’s duration.

Hallow’s End extends to Blizzard’s Hearthstone as well. Every week there’s a free gift for logging in, and players can participate in a “tricky” tavern brawl and dual class arenas.

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Massively OP Podcast Episode 140: Dubious drops in LOTRO, FFXIV, and SWTOR

On this week’s show, Justin and Bree navigate the dubious updates that dropped in several major MMOs (as well as a few other ones that seem to have gone off OK). It’s practically an all-patch, all-the-time show with the addition of a couple of interesting listener emails regarding accessibility and crafting!

It’s the Massively OP Podcast, an action-packed hour of news, tales, opinions, and gamer emails! And remember, if you’d like to send in your own letter to the show, use the “Tips” button in the top-right corner of the site to do so.

Listen to the show right now:

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Halloween events in Path of Exile, Master X Master, RIFT, EverQuest, Ultima Online, and AQ3D

It’s almost a full-time job to stay on top of all of the MMO and MOBA Halloween events popping up all over the place! Here’s another batch of deliciously frightful festivities that are going on right now in games all around you:

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Massively Overthinking: Three-way RvR and ‘fair’ PvP in modern MMOs

MOP reader Sally Bowls is on a roll with the good questions lately! She lobbed us one this past weekend that seems a good follow-up to a comment thread discussion about the problems inherent in unregulated three-way factional PvP/RvR (and how a game like Camelot Unchained will regulate it). By way of example, she noted that a certain MMO griefer famously argued in favor of strategy that basically made the opponent not want to log in, using tactics like creating timesinks and hassles in a sandbox. “Should the dominant faction on a RvRvR server ‘camp’ the smallest to try to drive them off?” she wondered.

“If it’s about fair PvP, then that is anathema. But if you see the game as being about your faction being at war with other factions, then not doing your utmost to win that war is incompetence. Neither is bad design per se, just a conflict in understanding of the goals. And will Camelot Unchained really be RvR, doing everything legal for your realm to win? Or will it be about PvP battles, with the RvR rhetoric being more marketing fluff than von Clausewitz and Machiavelli? If camping a mine hurts your kill/death ratio but makes the opponent weaker due to hassles or crafting, is that winning or losing? Is an RvR game really about realms vs. realms or is it just another BG?”

I’ve pitched Sally’s comments to the team for consideration in this week’s Massively Overthinking. Is RvR just a more carebear-friendly way to market FFA PvP? Do you play RvR or factional PvP to win or to have fun, and how does that differ from a more open FFA sandbox? How would you design three-way factional PvP to keep people from quitting and stop griefing before it starts?

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Massively OP Podcast Episode 139: Catching up with Legends of Aria

On this week’s show, Legends of Aria’s Derek Brinkmann returns for another interview about how the indie MMORPG is shaping up as it goes through its “final” alpha and heads toward beta and launch. We also dig deep into the mailbag to gripe about gambling!

It’s the Massively OP Podcast, an action-packed hour of news, tales, opinions, and gamer emails! And remember, if you’d like to send in your own letter to the show, use the “Tips” button in the top-right corner of the site to do so.

Listen to the show right now:

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The Daily Grind: Why does EVE survive where other PvP sandboxes stumble?

MOP reader Tobasco da Gama pointed us to a recent Reddit thread about why EVE Online persists, even in a weakened state, where other hardcore PvP sandboxes fail. The thread OP posits that in spite of what he calls “CCP’s criminal level of mismanagement and incompetence,” EVE has outlasted other games of its ilk, from Darkfall and Mortal Online to Albion Online and pre-Trammel Ultima Online. The reason? He argues it’s because the vast majority of players who don’t quit outright never leave high-sec and aren’t actually playing the “hardcore” PvP game that New Eden is known for at all. In other words? Most people playing EVE are carebears.

Fightin’ words, right? It makes a lot of sense to me, frankly, and since my husband still plays EVE, I’ve seen the phenomenon in action, that the toxic part of the playerbase perpetually eclipses the majority of normal folks just happily space mining and killing pirates and watching their skill bars go up.

Why do you think EVE survives where other PvP sandboxes stumble?

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