Monster Hunter World’s first patch is all about balance adjustments for weaponry

The first major patch for Monster Hunter World is arriving on March 16th, and thankfully it will include a new monster to fight in the form of Deviljho. That’s the only real content addition, though; the big feature is the laundry list of changes coming to every weapon in the game. Great Sword users will see increased damage from Charged Slash maneuvers, Long Sword users get big buffs to Foresight Slash, and Sword & Shield can toss beetles more effectively with a weapon drawn.

In fact, pretty much every weapon has seen some significant balance changes, except for bowguns; those are unadjusted. Lances in particular have been upgraded to be easier to use in general, which should be a boon to veteran players and Lance enthusiasts alike. There are also new quality of life features and a free ticket to adjust your character’s appearance, so even if you’ve only got one new monster to hunt, you should find plenty of other things to enjoy in the patch.

Source: Kotaku


Monster Hunter World previews a crossover with Devil May Cry

The Monster Hunter series is a set of video games in which you fight giant monsters and then harvest their corpses to make more powerful equipment. The Devil May Cry series is a set of video games in which you fight giant monsters while making flippant bon mots at the monster’s expense, then look really cool while letting them explode or sink into lava or whatever. Clearly, these are two great tastes that taste great together, which is why we’re getting a Devil May Cry crossover event in Monster Hunter World.

We don’t yet have a date for when this is going live, but players will be able to pick up gear based on DMC’s protagonist Dante through an event quest. It does not appear that you’ll also get the ability to deliver armor-piercing lines with a smirk, so you’ll have to provide that for yourself until your teammates beg you to be quiet. Check out the collaboration trailer just past the break.

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One-month impressions of Monster Hunter World

It’s been just over a month now since Monster Hunter World launched on PlayStation 4 and Xbox One, heralding a brand-new generation of Capcom’s acclaimed action-RPG franchise. As the first entry in the series developed for current-gen, non-handheld consoles since 2009’s Monster Hunter Tri, World marks a major transition for the series, one that brings with it sweeping changes to the time-honored formula upon which the series was built. There’s been, of course, some anxiety among the game’s community about what these changes might mean for the game’s future, with some fearing that the game would be watered down to attract a wider audience.

However, after putting a frankly embarrassing number of hours into the game, I’m happy to be able to say that there’s no need to panic. New features have been added, mechanics have been streamlined, and the world – fittingly enough – is more expansive and engrossing than ever. That’s not to say that the jump to a new generation has come without its costs, but make no mistake: For all its sweeping changes, World is still Monster Hunter through and through. And if you ask me, it’s the best one yet.

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Perfect Ten: The top 10 sexiest monsters of Monster Hunter World

I remember my first time. Unlike many hunters, I didn’t stalk her. In fact, she bumped into me. I was just strolling down the beach, collecting some bugs and BAM! There she was. Larger than life. I was a little scared, and I admit I tried to hide in a bush. She saw right through it. She chased me a bit since, well, I was hiding in a bush, but admittedly, she was also a predator. She wanted me, badly, and I kind of wanted her. We moved from the beach to the forest and even went on a bit of a mountain hike where I was finally able to mount her. I gave a few quick stabs before pulling out my big sword, deeply penetrating her and finally cutting off her tail. Tail cutting is kind of what I’m into…

…eh? I’m talking about my experience in Monster Hunter World, of course. Although, come to think of it, some of the monsters are kind of sexy if you really think about it. You do want to thank about it? Well, considering the season, I guess I can we can try a top ten of the sexiest monsters of Monster Hunter World. I’ve already consulted with one of our sexperts and veteran hunters, Matt Daniel. We had some deep(ly uncomfortable) conversations about criteria and decided to rely on our… um, “gut” instinct. I’ll be going beyond looks and dip into monster personality plus kink factors. There won’t be any discrimination between newcomers or old veterans, and all genders are welcome here. Just, um, no rotting flesh, no matter how great your personality is. Sorry, Odogaron.

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Monster Hunter World topples PlayerUnknown’s Battlegrounds on Xbox One

You cannot play Monster Hunter World on your desktop computer (for a while, anyhow). You cannot play PlayerUnknown’s Battlegrounds on your PlayStation 4. But you can play both titles on Xbox One, and when you put them head-to-head it turns out that MHW comes out on top. Yes, it’s toppled the free-for-all battle royale game from the top spot on the Xbox One for the first time in a while, which you could take to mean that it won the battle or that it successfully slew the beast.

You know, depending on your preferred game for the metaphor. It fits both.

The game is only winning out on the US sales charts at the moment, as UK charts show PUBG still on top, but it’s still a notable sales bump that speaks to the new title’s popularity. This is especially notable considering that Xbox One wasn’t involved in the game’s beta testing, indicating that it had a big popularity surge even without pre-launch pushing. Let’s see how long it can hold on to the top spot.

Source: VG24/7


Monster Hunter World offers $70K for proof of real-world monsters

Not too shabby there, Capcom: Monster Hunter World has already sold five million copies of the console edition of the game. (The PC version, you’ll recall, won’t launch until later this year.)

In conjunction with the launch, Capcom has apparently partnered with a “real-life monster hunter and Cryptozoologist,” which for some reason merits capitalization, to offer a £50,000 reward (about $70K US) to anyone who can submit “clear new evidence” of specific “monsters.” Sorry, you can’t just submit a particularly monstrous politician; your choices are Bigfoot, the Loch Ness Monster, Mongolian death worms, mermaids, the flying snake of Namibia, chupacabras, yeti, earth hounds, Yowie, and the Cornish owlman.

The good news for Capcom is that at least it won’t have to pay out that chunk of change. Let this serve as another reminder of the sort of cognitive deficiencies with which gaming studios believe gamers are saddled.

We delivered a guide to the game as well as our first impressions last week, so don’t miss those if you’re still considering trying the game on console!

Source: Press release, GIbiz


Monster Hunter World hands-on: Our first impressions of the PS4 launch

Hey fellow hunter! Did you also enjoy the Monster Hunter World weekend betas as I did? Wondering if the full version is the same? Well here’s the short answer: Nope! Article finished, time to go back to hunting.

Just kidding! While the release version of the game isn’t the same as what you played, it’s still recognizably a Monster Hunter game. We’ll talk more about the online experience once the game’s been released to the masses for awhile, but a few hours in with a review copy of the launch product have answered some questions and concerns that came up during my beta experience.

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The greenhorn hunter’s primer: Getting started in Monster Hunter World

As the end of January draws ever closer, so too does the official console release of Monster Hunter: World, the latest entry into Capcom’s venerable series of action-RPGs that began nearly 15 years ago with the release of the original Monster Hunter on the PlayStation 2 in 2004. It’s a momentous occasion for fans of the series, as it marks the first time since 2013’s Monster Hunter 3 Ultimate – itself an enhanced remake of 2010’s Monster Hunter Tri – that a main-series title will get a Western release on a non-handheld console. Although the series has long enjoyed popular success in Japan, where handheld consoles have a much stronger core playerbase, it has remained a largely niche title in the West, where home consoles and PCs reign supreme.

So I don’t think it’s too much of a stretch to say that the imminent release of Monster Hunter: World on PlayStation 4 and Xbox One (and the PC release slated for this Autumn) marks the start of a new generation of Monster Hunter. With this new generation of the series, there’s bound to come a new generation of would-be Hunters eager to experience the franchise’s unique brand of skill-based combat and addictive “kill-carve-craft” gameplay cycle. While the Monster Hunter community, in my experience, is far and away one of the friendliest, most helpful communities I’ve ever had the pleasure to be a part of, and there are already dozens of wonderful resources to help fledgling players find their footing, I thought I’d do my part to put together a quick primer for any greenhorns who may be taking their first steps into the expansive, sometimes-overwhelming realm of Monster Hunter when MHW drops on the 26th.

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Monster Hunter World schedules another PS4 beta, talks post-launch plans

Capcom is keeping those Monster Hunter World deets coming! The studio says it’s planning on a third beta round for North American PlayStation 4 players ahead of its official release. It’ll run January 18th to 22nd, with the PS4 launch still planned for January 26th. Of special note, players should expect “regular content updates as well as major title updates for free.”

“In addition to the previously released Great Jagras, Anjanath and Barroth quests, players will now be able to battle against the game’s terrifying and challenging flagship monster Nergigante,” Capcom says. “The steel dragon Kushala Daora is a beast with a body covered in metal plates and has the power to keep hunters at bay by generating wind storms around itself. The flame king dragon Teostra is a brutal fiend that spits blazing fire and any hunter who faces this fierce and deadly monster is in danger of being engulfed in a hellish inferno. Another monster introduced in the trailer [below] is Dodogama, a rock-eating wyvern that possesses a unique saliva that causes rock to become explosive, a hazardous mix it will spit at its foes to warn off attackers.”

Earlier this week, the studio told players the PC version is coming in the fall. Cue long sighs all around. But hey, at least there’s a new video!

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Hands-on with Monster Hunter World’s weekend beta – and how it compares to Dauntless

I won’t lie: The Monster Hunter World beta on console last weekend isn’t going to give you the best sense of the full monster hunting experience. It won’t let you explore the world like Link in Breath of the Wild. And it won’t scratch the full MMO-experience itch.

That being said, as someone who’s played multiple iterations of the series and deeply exploring the gaming genre as a whole, I found that MHW still surprised me with its freshness.

Old dog, new tricks

When I first heard about Dauntless, MH’s closest cognate, I was impressed. Simplifying certain parts of the MH experience for a broader audience sounded like a great idea. The game’s execution experienced at E3 and on my own made me feel like it has a potential audience. However, post-E3 MHW leaks had me geeking out hard. While Dauntless has its own weapon combos, art style, and direction, a lot of the more palatable and streamlined design is going into MHW instead – and it’s launching sooner.

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Monster Hunter World’s community will be bolstered with multiguilding

It’s interesting how Monster Hunter World, a game that is supposedly being made to specifically target western players, is adopting functionality that I’d imagine all gamers everywhere would appreciate. While portability, one of the series’ main draws, is being sidelined again, social structure is actually being enhanced with the release of squads or “circles,” MHW’s answer to guilds and clans.

Both of the above articles I’ve just linked to you focus on general social play, like the 16-person social areas, ability to arm wrestle for fun, and the chance to pick up various kinds of quests, but in-game support for long-term social groups is quite new to the series and is probably of more interest to MMO fans. Past MH games have had friends lists, but communities have largely been left to themselves to create clans, similar to how old-school online gamers (and some modern ones) built websites and created clan tags before developers gave them in-game tools to manage and label themselves.

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Monster Hunter World isn’t doing lockboxes or lootboxes either

Add Monster Hunter World to the pile of games that are standing against the exploitation of lockboxes and lootboxes. Multiple Monster Hunter devs told Gamespot this week that the game won’t have them and won’t need them. Granted, part of the reasoning is that the game itself already uses actual random in-game loot as a “core gameplay aspect,” something the Capcom team doesn’t want people to skip via microtransactions, gambling or not.

“I think the games that successfully do loot box systems are designed around them completely from the outside and they’re a core part of the gameplay loot, whereas as our loop, it’s more based on the gameplay action itself, then gathering items, then using that to create better gear, and then using that to go and do more action gameplay,” Game director Kaname Fujioka explained. “We would have to fundamentally rethink our gameplay loop. When you’re including loot boxes you have to make them desirable to players and make them want to have them by introducing them in basic gameplay. And then that leads to further opportunities for purchasing to save time or get cooler items. And with our gameplay, we can’t just put them in there and have it work. We’d have to have a substantial re-think, which is not something we’re particularly planning to do at this time.”

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Check out the central player hub for Monster Hunter World

If you haven’t guessed this from the title, Monster Hunter World is about hunting monsters. On a world. Exactly what it says on the tin, in brief. But you will have times when you are not hunting monsters for a given minute, and at that time what will you do? You’ll head back to the game’s hub of Astera, and you can check out some footage of exactly that hub from the recent Tokyo Game Show.

Obviously, all of the game’s interface elements are in Japanese, but the narrator is familiar enough with the language to make it clear what you’re watching unfold on the screen. And there’s plenty to check out, to boot, from the smithy to your ongoing research into the various monsters you’re hunting. Watch the full video just below if you can’t wait to learn more about what you’ll be doing during your non-hunting moments.

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