choose my adventure

Choose My Adventure tours a new MMO every month — with you, the reader, as the co-pilot, voting for how the writer plays from week to week. Our current captain is Eliot Lefebvre. [Follow this column’s RSS feed]

Choose My Adventure: Grinding away in Black Desert

Let me talk to you, my friends, about grinding. Specifically, about how it gets a bad reputation that it doesn’t altogether deserve.

How does this connect to this week’s adventures in Black Desert? Well, because I wound up doing a fair bit of grinding. It wasn’t intentional or anything, since my designated goal this week was to just trek about and see the sights for a bit. But if you give me a camp full of goblins just sitting in my path, and you have me, a player who’s more than willing to give these things a shot on the basis that the worst possible outcome is that I die… well, I’m going to fight those goblins. I’m going to fight them a bunch.

And, I think, this was ultimately a good thing. Because while the game still has all of the problems that I’ve seen to bother me up to this point, the grinding of goblins was a notable island of things feeling fresh, crisp, and responsive. It’s almost as if I enjoy the game more when I’m away from the things of man.

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Choose My Adventure: Learning to appreciate Black Desert

First and foremost, I’d like to thank the many people who informed me about how to hide the UI in Black Desert. I shouldn’t have needed to be told that, it seems, but I did, and I really do appreciate the insight; in this case, I’d rather be thought a fool and get the answer to my questions than deny it and continue on in ignorance. So now my only real problem is my usual inattentiveness about when I should take screenshots, not failing to understand how.

This coincides nicely with starting to appreciate the game a little bit more. The first week felt rather unclear, but now that I’ve spent a bit more time with the game I’m starting to grasp what it’s trying to do. I’m still not entirely sure if I like all of it, of course, but at least I feel that I’m able to determine that based on the actual game rather than my confusion over what the game wants from me.

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Choose My Adventure: Muddling through the start of Black Desert

After my first week of playing, I don’t know if I actually like Black Desert very much. I also don’t know entirely if it’s very good at what it’s trying to do. These are not the same thing.

My first experiences with the game were not exactly what I would call positive, but little of that had to do with the game itself (it’s hardly the game’s fault that one of my credit cards did not want to properly activate, for example, and while that made purchasing the title more annoying that’s really just my own problem). Once I actually got in and started playing with the character creator, though, it… well, it still had problems. But it’s an open question whether those problems are the fault of the game itself or just the problem of who is playing. And I also wonder how many of those will change over time as I do get accustomed to the game.

But, hey, at least it can’t be accused of being generic.

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Choose My Adventure: Gearing up for Black Desert

I’m going to be honest with you, folks; the last Choose My Adventure installment left me feeling kind of depressed. It’s a shame to see a game that could have really been something else wind up as little more than a footnote, a shadow of what it could have been. So I’m actually really excited to start up Black Desert simply because that means I’m not going to have that personal connection. Heck, I didn’t expect the game to make it this long, and we gave it Game of the Year.

This is also the first game out of the prior few entries that I’ve never even tried to play before. I’m completely new to it. But I wanted to delay it until the Dark Knight was in the game, because I do tend to enjoy that playstyle. (And then making my characters anything other than grim-faced stoic bringers of death, but that’s a discussion for the roleplaying column I don’t write any longer.) So let’s talk a little bit about the game because that’s what we always do before the fireworks start.

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Choose My Adventure: Wrapping up WildStar

Writing about WildStar at this point feels weird.

Obviously, I just finished up playing the game for this feature for four weeks. It feels fresh in my mind. And in many ways, it really has changed quite a bit from launch to its credit. In many other ways, it hasn’t changed much at all. And the ways in which it has changed would make a much bigger difference if those changes affected things that initially drove me away from the game.

So in many ways, when I write about WildStar now, I’m still writing about the launch version of the game. It’s just that we’re now several years out from that launch, and its potential to really be something no longer has the time to turn into reality. It’s still just a hope for what it could be, and there’s not much more to the game beyond what we see right now. So it’s the same state of the game, but it’s gone from promising opportunities to unrealized potential.

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Choose My Adventure: A high-level venture in WildStar

First and foremost, before I start talking about my last week of adventures in WildStar, I’d like to thank the developers for giving me an opportunity I rarely have in this column. Nine times out of ten the reality of the column means I don’t get to actually see high-level play at all; I don’t know that I’d classify this week’s adventure as being indicative of the whole level cap experience, but it gives me a better picture of it than just sitting down at level 10 or whatever.

I’d also like to thank a friend for accompanying me up to the high-level portion of the game, since she was curious about it as well. Teamwork, people, that’s what MMOs are all about.

When I originally played WildStar, I had in fact reached level cap and done a fair number of the initial crop of dailies during one of the earlier patches. Thus, my friend and I decided to unlock the Primal Matrix and head out to Arcterra, which was added too recently for either of us to have seen it in the past. Yes, that meant I wasn’t going to be in an area going “oh, I remember this,” but it meant that I’d have a good idea about that part of the endgame.

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Choose My Adventure: Poisoning the well in WildStar

It’s amazing how some things stick in your mind while others don’t. I honestly had forgotten about the whole questline in WildStar that involves showing off just how awful the Dominion can be until I was knee-deep in it, but as soon as I was in there, I remembered being impressed with it. There’s a lot to like: subtle worldbuilding and careful production that really sends a message and forces you to think about what you’re doing and why. I like that and appreciate it immensely.

That makes it a good companion piece to dungeon queues just not happening. And it also lines up nicely with the fact that this week’s CMA provides us with a heretofore unprecedented opportunity, one that I am very curious to see about the response to. It wasn’t really an option in the last installment, and it wasn’t necessary in the prior one anyhow… but now, it’s a choice. But let’s not get ahead of ourselves.

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Choose My Adventure: The overwhelming opening of WildStar

Playing WildStar for this week’s session was the first time I really felt old.

I had failed to account for two things when I got started last week. The first was that I had played this particular opening experience a few times before, so I was fairly familiar with the progression. (I forget, honestly, if the other starting area drops you off in a different region.) The second, however, was how the opening experience past the first zone doesn’t leave you many opportunities to… well, breathe.

Lightreach Mission in Ellevar nicely avoids the usual problem of starting towns in MMOs feeling very much like they’re just there to provide you with an immediate and largely disposable quest hub, so I appreciate that. The problem was, well… the sheer density of the place. You land, you pick up the first few quests, you start doing things and bam, welcome to in-your-face everything-is-happening land! It’s enough to make a guy feel old (even if I’m not).

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Choose My Adventure: Starting fresh in WildStar

There are times when I’ve been away from a game for a while that I’m honestly not sure if I remember something correctly. I like to think that I have a pretty good memory, and years of evidence tends to bear that out, but it is by no means a perfect memory. I forget things like anyone else. It’s always possible for me to forget one or two things as time goes by.

But then I run into something like WildStar’s starting tutorial, and there’s no ambiguity whatsoever. I definitely would have remembered this; this is downright different. This is a very new experience compared to how the starting experience on a new character used to run.

That’s not an entirely bad thing; while I liked the old starting experience, it wasn’t exactly great, and it was a lot of time spent farting about on a ship instead of actually, like, playing the game. So I think it’s worth examining on its own merits and deciding whether or not the game successfully introduces its core concepts with this version.

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Choose My Adventure: Reconsidering WildStar, from pre-launch to now

In order to talk about WildStar, we kind of have to talk about Firefly. And no, not in the obvious way where we talk about how dearly the game wants to be able to claim the heritage of Firefly for its own.

There’s a thing dubbed the Firefly Effect (I’m not linking TV Tropes here; y’all know where it is, look it up if you want to) that describes a kind of vicious cycle. You see something new and interesting previewed. However, you also see that it’s on a network that is unlikely to allow that interesting thing enough run time to really finish working itself out. So, to spare yourself any heartache when it gets cancelled, you don’t watch it. Later, it gets cancelled… because no one was watching it because everyone expected it would be cancelled.

The reason I bring that up is that WildStar is currently waist-deep in the Firefly Effect. Sure, it’s not a show, but the same operating principles are at work. People are afraid to commit for fear that it’ll be canned, and that makes any forward momentum for the game incredibly difficult.

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Choose My Adventure: LOTRO in hindsight, WildStar ahead

Writing about Lord of the Rings Online is an odd experience for me because the reality is pretty simple: I don’t like the game very much. But it’s not really the fault of the game itself.

There are, to be fair, a lot of games that I play without liking too much. That’s actually not too unusual, even. But there are also a lot of games I play that I am no longer playing but still have something I point to and say, “Yes, this right here, this makes it worth it.” The Secret World‘s ability building and setting are juxtaposed against awkward missions and lackluster combat. The Elder Scrolls Online has a mixture of open and linear elements and a greatly improved combat engine. Star Trek Online has plenty of open stuff in the endgame that almost justifies its incredibly complex opening moments. You get the idea.

But when I look at LOTRO, I see a game that more or less perfectly does what it wants to be doing with only a handful of exceptions. It just doesn’t ever make a connection with me whatsoever.

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Choose My Adventure: Wrapping up in Lord of the Rings Online

What is with me and ending this feature in slightly snowy pine-forested woodlands? That doesn’t make a whole lot of sense to happen twice in a row. Someone who isn’t me should speculate about that.

At any rate, this is my final installment for Lord of the Rings Online, and it wraps up with… a remarkably short list of choices actually made. I’ve been informed reliably by you lovely people that it was entirely possible for me to jaunt over to one of the other starting zones, and that may have ultimately made a difference, but by the time I knew that I was already invested in helping out a bunch of elves. And I did just that, right up until it was time to wave farewell.

But talking about the larger context is something for next week. For now, let’s talk a bit about moving out of the very Elf-focused areas and into more common spaces.

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Choose My Adventure: Nice things about Lord of the Rings Online

The thing about the level of Lord of the Rings Online that I’m playing at is that they are not exactly replete with choices. I am reliably informed (by you lovely readers, no less) that you can pretty easily dart between starter areas if you so desire, but that’s about it; the lower levels are a fairly linear experience. It kind of makes sense, seeing as how it’s a game with a pretty straightforward narrative and drive, but it also means that the whole process is a bit straightforward.

However, last week I feel like I did a fair bit of grousing about the game, which isn’t entirely fair. Another week of pointing out the same things wouldn’t really accomplish much of use, would it? Instead, I want to talk today about all of the stuff I’m liking about the game. I can’t promise that one or two minor complaints might work their way in there, but that’s not my focus for the day.

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