culture

Terry Crews just didn’t fit as Doomfist according to Blizzard’s team

Fans had an image in their heads about what Overwatch’s Doomfist would sound like. It included Terry Crews, and it probably included him hollering about Old Spice while punching people despite the litany of trademark issues that would cause. But Crews is not Doomfist, and thus Gamespot even asked Blizzard why the actor wasn’t cast as the punch-happy Talon leader.

The short version is that while Blizzard’s team loves Crews and the voice he would have brought to the role, it just wasn’t quite right for the character they had envisioned for Doomfist. Sahr Ngaujah, who does voice Doomfist, brought the right sort of subtlety and character to the role. This doesn’t preclude working with Crews for a different character, nor does it prevent you from screaming about body wash while you play the character, but we suppose when your character is named “Doomfist” and punches everything, you have to take the few opportunities that present themselves for restraint.

Source: Gamespot via VG24/7

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Neverwinter launches Tomb of Annihilation today

Dinosaurs, jungles, and tombs, oh my! All of these can be found in the latest major update to Neverwinter. The Tomb of Annihilation update goes live today for PC players, bringing players to Chult in order to explore new ruins, enjoy a new social hub, and dive deep into fighting all sorts of monstrous foes to get that sweet, sweet loot. It’s the journey and the destination.

To be a bit more specific, this addition includes the new adventure zone of Chult Jungle, the Port Nyanzaru social hub, and the Tomb of the Nine Gods dungeon. It also features the new monster hunts with Volo and the continuing campaign storyline for players to enjoy. Check out the launch trailer just below, and log in and start patching if you can’t wait to be welcomed to the jungle. (And, quite possibly, welcomed to the internal digestive tract of a tyrannosaur shortly thereafter.)

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Check out a trailer for ArcheAge’s upcoming naval arena

Battle on the high seas! Cannons firing, seas foaming, decks wet, local slang dialect nearly incomprehensible! If that all sounds like fun times to you, then you’ll want to get in on the naval arenas coming to ArcheAge in the near future; the trailer for that update is available now just below, and it features everything you’d want from such a trailer. (So, boats shooting at one another, in other words.)

Teams of four will take on the battle, fighting not just the opposing team but the raging waters and neutral sea monsters. There’s no word on when this is coming out to the localized version of the game, but you can take a look at the trailer and get hyped for when it does arrive. You can even experience it in VR, if you have a friend nearby ready to spray your face with water repeatedly.

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Skyforge takes a first look at regional invasion

There are regions in Skyforge that are largely irrelevant to higher-level players. There are a lot of invasions in Skyforge. The two things have largely remained separate from one another, but someone finally looked at these two elements and asked a reasonable question. “Why don’t the invasions hit these underused regions?” that bright soul asked.

Wine bottles were opened. Cheering was heard. It was the moment that changed everything.

This may be a slight dramatization, of course, but the point is that the need to breathe new life into these regions is coupled nicely with new fronts in the existing invasions. So players can look forward to regional invasions in the not-so-distant future, pitting player forces against invading armies in new settings that scale for a variety of levels. So now you have a reason to go back to areas you left behind and the invading armies don’t seem like they can only invade spots with the proper invasion paperwork. Everybody wins! Except the residents of the regions being invaded, presumably.

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PSA: Today is your last chance to buy a Kritika Online founder’s pack

Been on the fence about buying in to Kritika Online? It’s time to make a decision now, because the game’s founder’s packs are going away very soon. Tomorrow, even. So you have today (and no longer) to buy in the founder’s pack and get things like exclusive costumes and pets.

Of course, it’s also worth noting that the costumes in question that serve as headliners are only available in the most expensive founder’s pack, which clocks in at $99.99. The cheaper versions offer no costumes but a variety of other benefits. You can decide for yourself if it’s worth the price up front or not; you’ll just have to make that decision soon before the last pack is sold and they’re gone forever. So no pressure. (You can take a look at our stream of the game to catch a glimpse of what it looks like in play, too.)

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Wisdom of Nym: What happens next in Final Fantasy XIV?

It’s pretty clear that the Final Fantasy XIV team (and the localization team specifically) are pretty huge fans of Hamilton, to the point that I’m surprised that the Emperor didn’t specifically burst into a song from the musical in the ending sequence. Especially because it’s… kind of a relevant question at this point, once you’ve seen the end of the MSQ.

So what does come next?

Obviously, this column will feature spoilers, so consider yourself fairly tagged. But I think this is a relevant question to ask because this expansion is, in its own way, a very different animal from its two predecessors right out of the gate. The relaunch ended its story in a place so open that it could really go wherever without a problem, while Heavensward ended the 3.0 MSQ with obvious points for continuation. (It helped that the obvious thrust of the expansion took a sharp left turn around level 55.) In the case of Stormblood, though…

Yes, I’m avoiding saying more before the cut. Spoilers down below, people.

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The Daily Grind: How do you feel your first MMO influences your current playstyle?

I can tell you what my observations have been about how people act based on their first MMO, but I can only guess at the ways having Final Fantasy XI as my first game have influenced my subsequent play choices. I know that after that game I’m far more leery of any game requiring me to group up with others just to level up, often times eschewing the “fastest” methods of grouping and grinding just out of a deep-seated distaste for that. I’m also eager to dive into lore and world details, sometimes to the point of seeing depths in hints and suggestion that turn out to not be there on closer inspection.

So today, we turn the question over to you. How do you feel your first MMO influences your current playstyle? Part of it depends on what your first MMO is, of course, but the analysis from there is all you. Does having World of Warcraft as your first MMO make you gravitate toward raiding or specifically avoid it? Does listing Anarchy Online as your first MMO lead you to be more social or less social? Share your self-analysis with us! We’re curious.

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Valiance Online works with the community to develop and show off powersets

Do you like pets, powersets, and behind-the-scenes development glances? Then you’ll enjoy the nearly four hours of Valiance Online stream footage now available just below, which features a discussion of the enhancement system, spreadsheet development, the start of a community-developed powerset (Bubble Projection, starts at around the two-hour mark), a look at one of the pet powersets available, and plenty of in-jokes and laughs among the developers. The video is long, but you can safely skip to around 24:00 and not miss any of the important moments.

If you don’t have time to watch all of that or would prefer more direct information, you can check out the game’s latest lore article about the Starborn, a gang of fashion-obsessed custom-tailored psionic troublemakers jockeying for power more due to boredom than anything else. They’re chasing the latest psionic technology and the latest fashion, and they’re willing to make an absolute mess of the world in the process. So that’s going to be fun.

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Lord of the Rings Online explains the Allegiance system in Mordor

We’re probably not going to blow your mind by saying this, but here it is anyway: Mordor in Lord of the Rings Online is not a friendly place. You’re shocked, obviously. But the point is that you’ll need to have some allies to deal with the problems of that land, and those allies need to know you’re their ally. Hence, the upcoming Allegiances system, a chance for players to improve reputation and standing with one of four factions for cosmetic rewards and unique storylines.

It’s important to note that the four factions (the Hobbits of the Company, Durin’s Folk, the Court of Lothlorien, and the Kingdom of Gondor) will not affect your access to endgame gear, even though the Allegiance system will be tied into the endgame. But your choice is mostly between the four stories you wish to follow and which cosmetic gear you want to access first. Still, much like Merry and Pippin’s oaths of service (which formed the initial concept for this system), it’s going to be important from a narrative standpoint to consider whom your character will bend a knee for.

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The Daily Grind: What simple tasks does your favorite MMO make unnecessarily difficult?

For the longest time, logging out of Final Fantasy XI was something of a nightmare. First, you had to get to a mog room, or else you had to wait for an extended period of time to log off (unlike other games such as World of Warcraft, you can’t just force an immediate logoff while your character stays in place longer). Then, you had to exit out of the PlayOnline Viewer, a program with the sole purpose of making you angry that you were playing the game. It was just a matter of logging on and logging off, but imagine adding two extra minutes or so to every single time you want to get offline.

Of course, I figure every game has some issues along those lines. It was always such a pain to just get your fellow players onto the bridge of your ship in Star Trek Online, and I found map waypoints in Lord of the Rings Online to be irritating to see. None of these things are complex for the player, but their simplicity makes it almost more annoying when these things are inconvenient or difficult. So what would you say? What simple tasks does your favorite MMO make unnecessarily difficult?

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Neverwinter reveals gear sets found in Tomb of Annihilation

When you dive into Chult for Neverwinter’s next expansion, you’re going to be facing new threats. And what goes well with new challenges? New equipment, obviously. The latest development update discusses the gear you’ll be getting, starting with the fact that Chult’s gear doesn’t involve set bonuses; instead, each individual piece has a bonus, freeing you to play around a little more with mixing and matching.

Characters fresh off of the boat can pick up a new set with bonuses devoted to fighting harder when you’re at lower health, and there’s also a slightly better set available for players who earn the trust of the locals that’s all about strength in numbers. Hunt marks drop still more powerful gear, and players can also pick up the best gear available by diving deep into the Tomb of the Nine Gods. Check out the full preview if you’re eager to see what new fashions you can wear as you head into the jungle.

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Even mainstream sites are starting to notice Final Fantasy XIV’s housing problems

Did you know that Final Fantasy XIV has a housing system that’s particularly restrictive and makes it unnecessarily difficult to own a house? Probably, seeing as how we’ve been talking about it here on MOP for years. This is not new information. But with the new server transfers in place and people noting that two players have taken up an entire district of the game’s limited housing on the basis of “we really like decorating and we need thirty houses of varying sizes to do that,” even mainstream sites are noticing that maybe this system is not a great one.

Of course, if you already know that the game’s housing system is unnecessarily difficult to work with and makes it difficult for players to get any housing plot, there’s little to be said here that you won’t already be intimately familiar with. It’s been a refrain for quite some time. And if you haven’t already seen that elsewhere… well, welcome to here.

Source: Gamasutra

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The Daily Grind: Have you ever fallen for an MMO after giving it a second chance?

It’s no secret that there are a lot of games out there I fell for on my first try (Final Fantasy XI, World of Warcraft, Final Fantasy XIV, Star Trek Online), but you know what game I couldn’t stand when I first played it? City of Heroes. I played, thought it totally missed what would have made a superhero MMO fun, and left it behind with a sense of bitter disappointment. It was several months before I gave it another shot; when I did, it was lover at second sight.

This is not entirely foreign to me; my first impression of The Elder Scrolls Online was definitely negative, but going back to it produced much warmer feelings. Then again, there are games which I don’t care for much on my first try that later do nothing to change my mind. What about you, dear readers? Have you ever fallen for an MMO after giving it a second chance? And if so, have you found it has more to do with changes to the game or with yourself?

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