keepstar

EVE Online political betrayal results in record-breaking theft

The EVE Online twitterverse exploded late last night with the news of a political twist so enormous that it’s become the largest recorded theft of in-game assets in the game’s history. In the middle of the night and without warning, major EVE military alliance Circle of Two (or CO2 for short) was betrayed by its diplomatic officer, a player with the ominous name of The Judge. In addition to cleaning out the alliance war funds and assets to the tune of over a trillion ISK, The Judge also transferred ownership of CO2’s 300 billion ISK keepstar citadel in its capital star system of 68FT-6 to a holding corporation, effectively stealing the alliance’s home space station.

News of The Judge’s betrayal trickled out of EVE all through the night, and it wasn’t long before the full extent of the incident was known. The 68FT-6 keepstar was sold to enemy alliance Goonswarm Federation, while CO2’s smaller citadels throughout Impass are now in the hands of TEST Alliance. The theft combined with the value of the citadels is estimated at over 1.5 trillion ISK, easily beating the 2011 trillion ISK Phaser Inc scam to become the highest-value theft in EVE‘s history. The actual damage done is even more extensive, injecting a huge dose of chaos into CO2 alliance and throwing fuel on the fire of the southern war.

Read on for a detailed breakdown of last night’s record-breaking theft, the reasons behind the betrayal, and the political situation that led us here.

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EVE Evolved: The strategy and narrative of EVE’s revenge war

At the start of this month, we reported on a massive new war that was kicking off in the north of EVE Online. The words “The Imperium Strikes Back!” rang across the game as one of the game’s largest military coalitions moved thousands of capital ships north in preparation for what it called a “dirty war.” The group planned to dump hordes of capital ships on the enemy aggressively and with little regard of the financial cost, using its vast economic wealth to spread pain and misery. This was going to be The Imperium’s great return to nullsec warfare after a year of farming ISK and building up resources, and that narrative was used to get thousands of players on board.

The reality hasn’t been quite so dramatic, but it’s been very interesting on a strategic level. We’ve seen the narrative of this war change substantially over the past few weeks and watched as every victory or loss is quickly spun into propaganda. The Imperium has lost several key battles and appears totally outmatched by the combined supercapital forces of the north, but has also destroyed a few enemy citadels and is already claiming victory over its primary strategic objective. TEST Alliance has seen its own share of victories and defeats in the region against Northern Coalition and Pandemic Legion too, but is now in the process of packing up to go home.

In this edition of EVE Evolved, I examine the major strategic goals during this war, the apparent change in The Imperium’s narrative, and the effect on the average alliance line member.

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EVE Online’s massive Battle at the M-O Keepstar has cost gamers over $7000 so far

Another massive battle has taken over EVE Online, this one likely to go down in EVE history as the Battle at the M-O Keepstar, what one player dubbed “the first real Keepstar fight since Citadels came out.” (The one earlier this year was plagued with exploiting, presumably keeping it out of the running.)

Those of you who follow EVE know that reporting on it can be difficult given the extreme trolling and deliberate disinformation campaigns that take place across social media and Reddit. But here’s what does appear to be true: Yesterday, a reported record 4400 players clustered ships in the system to take down and defend the Keepstar, which belongs to Circle of Two and is located in M-OEE8. Another tally so far puts the count at 1636 players from Circle of TEST’s alliance, 2242 players from PanFam’s alliance, and 339 randoms, with a grand total to date of 266 billion ISK in losses. Keepstars themselves are worth about 350 billion, making the possible losses worth over $7000 in real money (using 1.2B ISK), a very conservative number that will surely only continue to rise as the last third of the Keepstar still remains. Of course, it wouldn’t be EVE without conflicting reports of industrial sabotage and a literal second Death Star defense fake-out.

The battle rages on in chunks thanks to EVE’s staggered vulnerability timers, so stay tuned for the conclusion on Saturday. We’ve included some Reddit images of the scene. “Thanks for sharing,” said one gamer, with a jab at time dilation. “I missed this slide during the live presentation.”

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EVE Evolved: Controversy over gambling bans and charities

It’s been a crazy, drama-filled week in EVE Online, starting with a controversial change to the EULA that will ban all gambling sites using in-game currency or assets when the Ascension expansion arrives on November 8th. The move comes alongside the banning of high-profile gambling kingpins Lenny Kravitz2 and IronBank, the two players who famously funded World War Bee using the trillion-ISK profit fountains of a casino empire.

The gambling ban is expected to be a serious blow to player-run events, charitable organisations, and even some blogs, all of which have been funded in part by gambling sites for several years. With its main benefactor now banned, charitable organisation Care 4 Kids has come under renewed pressure from players questioning its profit-making activities and political motives. Over the past year, the group has erected a massive citadel structure, gained territory in nullsec, and even hired farming corps.

In this in-depth edition of EVE Evolved, I look at why the gambling ban was necessary, the impact that ISK from gambling has had on EVE, and the recent drama that’s bubbled up around the Care 4 Kids charity.

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EVE Fanfest 2016: Andie Nordgren on EVE Online’s Citadel expansion launch and beyond

EVE Online‘s highly anticipated Citadel expansion has now launched, adding a whole new class of player-built structures to the game for corporations to build and smash to bits. The new citadels can be built anywhere in space, allowing players to plant their virtual flag and base of operations near stargates, NPC stations, asteroid belts, and other points of interest. Industrialists are currently scrambling to manufacture those first few citadels to sell on the open market for a massive profit, but when the dust settles the prices are expected to low enough that even small corporations will be able to afford their own citadels.

To put EVE’s largest alliances to the test, CCP has also added the Palatine Keepstar, a beefy x-large citadel with the interesting twist that only one can be built in EVE at a time. The Palatine Keepstar costs around 200 trillion ISK (15% of EVE’s total economic wealth) to build, which is around $3,000,000 to $4,000,000 worth of PLEX. We still have no idea whether the Palatine Keepstar will ever be built or what players will ultimately end up doing with standard citadels. This expansion is the first huge step toward Executive Producer Andie Nordgren’s future vision of deep space colonisation accessible to all players. The next step comes in the fall when players will get access to industrial structures and in winter when we get automated drilling platforms.

Read on for our interview from EVE Fanfest 2016 with EVE‘s Executive Producer Andie Nordgren on what comes next after the Citadel expansion.

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EVE Evolved: Citadel stats revealed, theorycrafting begins

EVE Online‘s Citadel expansion is due to launch this spring, transforming the way many of us play the game through the introduction of player-owned citadels. Building and running your own space stations seems like a no-brainer for a space sandbox MMO, but until now it’s been a very complicated and costly affair that usually appealed to only the most hardcore of players and corporations. Citadels promise to open that gameplay to everyone and make it a hell of a lot more compelling, with easy-to-use stations that can be built almost anywhere in space for as little as a few hundred million ISK.

This expansion will be the biggest step yet toward CCP’s grand sandbox vision for accessible space colonisation revealed at Fanfest 2013, with future steps including things like industrial structures and player-built stargates. Developers have now released the preliminary stats for the new structures and all of the modules and rigs that can be fitted to them, in addition to the proposed component lists and fuel costs. This information has sparked fresh speculation on how each of the three sizes of citadel will be used when the expansion goes live in just a few months, and many are already buying up materials and making plans.

In this edition of EVE Evolved, I summarise all of the recently released information on player-owned citadels and draw some conclusions on how each of the three citadels will be used.

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