linden lab

Known primarily for Second Life.

Five MMOs you’ve never heard of: Metin2, Orake, Crusaders of Light, Legends of Equestria, and Sansar

We’re willing to bet that some of you visit Massively OP because you are keeping an eye out for new conquests: games you have never heard of, hidden titles that beg to be brought to your attention. Well, today is that day because we have a list of five MMOs for you to check out and see if they warrant your attention and devotion.

The list begins with Metin2, an Asian martial arts MMO chock-full of wicked fighting moves, demon lords, and Chinese aesthetics. Another free Steam game to check out might be Orake, a 2-D MMO that looks like it would be at home in 1997.

The creators of Second Life have made a sequel of sorts with Sansar. This virtual world is a build-anything, do-anything sandbox, and Kotaku has a hands-on with the closed beta. It should be available in open beta testing later this summer.

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The MOP Up: EVE Valkyrie lowers its price point (June 11, 2017)

The MMO industry moves along at the speed of information, and sometimes we’re deluged with so much news here at Massively Overpowered that some of it gets backlogged. That’s why there’s The MOP Up: a weekly compilation of smaller MMO stories and videos that you won’t want to miss. Seen any good MMO news? Hit us up through our tips line!

This week we have stories and videos from MechWarrior OnlineGuild Wars 2EverQuest IICabal OnlineEVE ValkyrieParagonSecond LifeLuna OnlineAtelier OnlineFinal Fantasy XILegend of Ancient Sword OnlineNo Man’s SkyHeroes of the StormArt of ConquestDreadnoughtOverwatchSINoALICEBlade and SoulPokemon Go, and Eternal Crusade, all waiting for you after the break!

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Second Life bunnies doomed to death

If Second Life had a mascot, other than a pile of soiled sex toys, it might just be Ozimals. These are adorable little bunnies that can be bred to produce all kinds of rare and interesting patterns and could interact with AI scripts. There’s apparently been a thriving industry and subculture raging around these fluffy hareballs that’s involved marketplaces and real-world money.

Well all of that activity — and many of the Ozimals themselves — is coming to a sad end today. Earlier this week, the operator of Ozimals received a cease-and-desist letter ordering the market to be shut down. It turns out that the bunnies were cobbled together using intellectual property from different owners, leaving the critters vulnerable to such legal maneuvering.

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Second Life as a modern refuge for the disabled

I’m certain I’m not alone in having been ill and injured several times over my life, once when I couldn’t walk without considerable effort and crutches for many months thanks to a busted ankle — and online games were a window to the world for me during each of those times, even more so than they are now.

Now imagine that you’re permanently disabled — or maybe you already are. That’s the topic of a Backchannel article published last week on 2003 virtual world Second Life. Author Kristen French dug into the apparently large — estimates begin at 20% of the game’s 800,000 monthly active users — disabled community in the “hugely profitable” Second Life world, where activists run social groups and events for people with everything from mobility issues to speech and hearing disorders and even autism.

Of note, one of the players profiled in the piece is getting more than comfort.

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We’re gonna have gorgeous hair in City of Titans

A few weeks ago, the Massively OP writers were hanging in the news room on a tear about mohawks. We’re not against mohawks. Mohawks are cool. But when we open up a character creator and see 50 different types of mohawks and little else? Not cool — just lazy.

So it’s with excitement that I pass along this City of Titans forum piece that profiles Hunter Robins, the 3D developer working on the indie superhero game’s hairstyles, who says he got into game design after catching the team’s eye with his self-taught Sims modding, which he eventually turned into a revenue stream in Second Life, and then into ARK: Survival Evolved modding.

“My job is to deliver a set of quality hairstyles to give the player a variety to choose from, hoping to guarantee at least one they will really enjoy,” he writes.

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The Daily Grind: Have you ever participated in a protest in an MMORPG?

Protests in the real world dominated this past weekend’s news, and while I surfed around for an in-game equivalent to cover, I couldn’t find much of one (though I found people selling themed accessories in Second Life!). That said, protests in MMORPGs aren’t unheard of, and I mean actual protests, not memorials and vigils. World of Warcraft players will remember multiple protests throughout that game’s history, mostly against the design of the game, but sometimes against Blizzard’s policies. How about the Million Gnome March, for example, which caused game outages and threats from the studio claiming protests were “griefing”? Or the 2006 protests against Blizzard’s stance on LGBT guilds — which the studio reversed? How about the multiple Occupy SAB protests in Guild Wars 2, which ArenaNet allowed to transpire without much fuss?

I’ve never been to an in-game protest that I recall [Edit: I’m wrong. I have! See comments!], but I did stage my own one-woman protest in Star Wars Galaxies, where following the pronouncement that “no one wanted to play Uncle Owen” because moisture farmers were boring, I promptly rolled a character whose primary role was moisture farming on her permanently installed moisture farm. I made a lot of credits and had a lot of fun selling water on that character, right up until the day the servers were sunsetted. Silly? Maybe, but it gave me some life to prove that the suits were full of shit and didn’t really understand the first thing about their own playerbase.

Have you ever participated in a protest in an MMORPG?

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Perfect Ten: The worst-squandered IPs in online gaming

There are always going to be differences in opinion about what should be done with an IP based upon a franchise. That’s just natural. The same core universe could be used to make a sprawling sandbox with weak combat but a robust non-combat market and profession system, or it could be used to make a combat-focused experience that focuses on energetic fights, nifty story moments, and little else. In both cases, even if you don’t like the end result, you can understand exactly why the IP was used for this.

Our column today is not about those games. No, this is about games that completely failed to make use of their licenses to IPs, produced totles that did not in any way logically follow from the license that was given, or otherwise took pure gold and turned it into something… less than gold. There’s room to debate whether some of these IPs would ever make good MMOs, but boy, the uses we have were pretty bad.

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Player wanders into deserted virtual world, finds abundant creepiness

Chances are that you’re unfamiliar with Active Worlds. It was a virtual world created in 1995 with the ability for players to create their own content. Kind of a predecessor to Second Life, if you will.

So our story today begins with a YouTuber named Vinny who was checking out this largely deserted game for his video series. During his explorations, he came upon a figure named Hitomi Fujiko, who Vinny first assumes to be an NPC due to the repeated statements by the character. However, Hitomi Fujiko reveals that he’s a player (possibly roleplaying) and starts following Vinny around and saying incredibly creepy things, such as “Human… I didn’t want to tell you this… but this land it is empty” and “Please tell me I exist.”

The stranger finally says, “I can’t even feel pain” and then (seriously) transforms into a werewolf, yelling at Vinny to run. Now, this could be a total set-up between two players, but if not, it’s definitely one of the more disturbing things you’ll see all day. You can watch the edited and subtitled encounter between Vinny and Hitomi Fujiko after the break.

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The Game Archaeologist: 1988’s Monster

“You’re in the middle of a vast hall stretching out of sight to the east and west. Strange shadows play across the high vaulted ceiling. The floor is set with smooth rectangular stones. The walls feel slightly cold to the touch, and damp with condensation. A copper plaque, slightly green with age, is set into one wall.”

Old-school gamers are probably quite familiar with text adventure paragraphs such as the one above. Emerging from the ’70s, text adventure games offered computer players a way to explore detailed virtual worlds before technology advanced enough to substitute words with graphics. Searching locations, picking up items, solving puzzles, discovering mysteries, and advancing to new areas kept many adventure gamers playing long into the night.

While most adventure games were static and home to only one player at a time, one college student in 1988 decided to change the rules and make a title that would be a living, breathing beast. He called it Monster.

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One Shots: Rainbow glory

Even the grimdark world of Diablo III has a cute, rainbow-colored side… and reader Zulika is the one to take us through the wardrobe and into that magical world.

“In Diablo III there is a hidden land called Whimsydale in which you are attacked by pink & purple unicorns, flowers, and teddy bears,” he said. “Here I am battling Evil Oliver, an elite teddy bear produced by the Happy Company, so that I can get to that loot piñata hanging from the nearby tree. Smiley rainbow clouds look on as my minion splits the last unicorn into flying bits. For my efforts of clearing this eye-bleeding map, I received a dagger that looks like a hamburger. Eight out of 10, would burgle again.”

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The Daily Grind: How might VR reshape the MMOscape?

Oculus Connect 2, a VR conference hosted by the folks behind Oculus, is set for just a few weeks from now. You probably didn’t know that, and that’s because we don’t cover the VR scene heavily, and that’s because VR appears to go over like a ton of bricks with MMO die-hards unless we’re talking about the Zenimax/Oculus lawsuit (save some popcorn for me, guys).

But a few of you can’t stop dreaming about what a future of VR-enhanced MMOs might look like. Massively OP Kickstarter donor Revek is one such dreamer; for today’s Daily Grind, he asks, “How do you think virtual reality like Oculus is going to change MMOs?”

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These are the companies that are trying to build the metaverse

Did you know that Linden Lab is hard at work on a sequel to its Second Life virtual world? Yep, it is, and Recode has published a lengthy piece that not only looks at Linden’s Project Sansar but also at a handful of other companies who hope to create some sort of metaverse in the vein of Stephenson’s Snow Crash over the next decade or two.

Original Second Life creator Philip Rosedale is also in the mix thanks to his firm High Fidelity which has raised $17.5 million in venture capital to date, as is a company called Altspace VR that has $15.6 million and counts evil cable empire Comcast and Chinese MMO publisher Tencent among its investors. Those are just a couple of the companies profiled, and then of course there’s Facebook which famously acquired Oculus Rift in 2014.

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The Game Archaeologist: The Sims Online

The Sims Online was one of the odder entrants into the MMO genre, an online iteration of an immensely popular game franchise that promised deeper social interaction. With Electronic Arts at its back and the Will Wright name affixed to the front, TSO (not to be confused with Cryptic’s STO) had a solid shot at cracking the big time.

It did not. It went over as well like a fish flopping out of water to make a go for it on dry land, eventually realizing that it was both going nowhere and dying slowly. The end result? It stunk.

And yet it was an interesting failed experiment in MMO gaming, especially considering that the concept wasn’t as off-base as we once thought. With social “dress up” games like Second Life and Habbo Hotel that have proved there’s interest in such activities, The Sims Online could be seen as a prophet of the future, mistreated in its own time. Return with us to the days of pixelated 2-D isometric glory, as the I interpret the Simlish of ancient tomes to uncover a forgotten history.

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