mythic entertainment

Originally known for Dark Age of Camelot, Mythic was snapped up by EA and put to work on several other MMOs new and old, including Warhammer Online and Origin’s Ultima Online, which predated it. It was closed down in 2014, but not before spinning out DAOC and UO to newly formed company Broadsword Online.

The MOP Up: SMITE’s bad news bears (August 6, 2017)

The MMO industry moves along at the speed of information, and sometimes we’re deluged with so much news here at Massively Overpowered that some of it gets backlogged. That’s why there’s The MOP Up: a weekly compilation of smaller MMO stories and videos that you won’t want to miss. Seen any good MMO news? Hit us up through our tips line!

Maybe you’ll discover a new game in this space — or be reminded of an old favorite! This week we have stories and videos from Villagers and HeroesAionDark and LightPokemon GoGuild Wars 2DefianceWurm OnlineDC Universe OnlineChampions OnlineDark Age of CamelotElder Scrolls OnlineSMITE, and Dota 2, all waiting for you after the break!

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Hacker claims to have made a living cheating in MMOs for two decades

Motherboard has a fun-slash-depressing piece out this week on an unnamed hacker who claims he’s been cheating at MMORPGs to make a living for almost two decades.

Prior to his recent Def Con hacking conference talk, the hacker dubbed “Manfred” seemingly demoed via video a hack performed in WildStar, one he used to help him accrue nearly 400 trillion gold, which he then allegedly sold to players through various black markets. He argues he wasn’t hacking — he was providing a service by “finding unintended features in the protocol.”

At least some of his claims don’t even seem particularly outlandish, especially if you’ve been around in MMORPGs for a long time and have an understanding of how rampant duping and RMT markets have been over the last 20 years. Manfred claims he got his start in Ultima Online illegally deleting other players’ houses and selling his own on Ebay, funding his days in college. Since then, Motherboard says, he cheated and duped his way through the “wild west” of Lineage 2, Shadowbane, Final Fantasy XI, Dark Age of Camelot, Lord of The Rings Online, RIFT, Age of Conan, Star Wars: The Old Republic, and Guild Wars 2.

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Ultima Online starts testing its fall update while Dark Age of Camelot continues its Dragon’s Curse campaign

Let’s check in with the Broadsword MMOs to see what’s happening in its part of the online world, shall we?

Ultima Online has kicked off testing on Publich 98, a meaty fall patch that includes 20th anniversary rewards, the return of the Halloween event, new beasts for the Huntmaster’s Challenge, and pet adjustments. The team also teased 20th anniversary content: “A multi-part arc will be active on production shards during the months of August and September, 2017.”

Over at Dark Age of Camelot, the fifth chapter of the Dragon’s Curse campaign is underway. This time players will take up arms to defeat the leaders of the Cursed uprising. The current campaign is scheduled to roll out over the rest of 2017, concluding in December.

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Perfect Ten: MMO zones I love to hate

Let’s be frank: Not every MMO zone can be a masterpiece of art, design, quest flow, and navigability. I mean, they totally should be, but that’s not how it shakes out in actual games. Sometimes regions get rushed, or the developers get a little too crazy with level design, or someone with a doomsday device in the office threatens to set it off unless an area made up of nothing but jumping puzzles is included.

The end result? “Those” zones we love to hate. We all have them. They’re the ones we seem to relish whining and complaining about to anyone who will listen, often instigating an echo chamber of like-minded grudges. We’ve been there, done that, and felt that our psyche took a hit as a result.

Today I want to look back at 10 MMOs I’ve played over the years to pick out a zone from each that, honestly, I really, really disliked. Perhaps the fact that I still remember them so vividly means that they were more important memories than the well-done zones that escape me at the moment, but I’m not going to think on that too much. Let the gripe session begin!

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The MOP Up: Gamescom’s big opening by Angela Merkel (June 25, 2017)

The MMO industry moves along at the speed of information, and sometimes we’re deluged with so much news here at Massively Overpowered that some of it gets backlogged. That’s why there’s The MOP Up: a weekly compilation of smaller MMO stories and videos that you won’t want to miss. Seen any good MMO news? Hit us up through our tips line!

This week we have stories and videos from MechWarrior OnlineMu OriginDark Age of CamelotAstellia OnlineMarvel End Time ArenaRagnarok Online, and Guild Wars 2, all waiting for you after the break!

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Dark Age of Camelot prepares new Mithril currency shop

What’s going on over in Dark Age of Camelot land? For that you’ll have to turn to the latest Q&A grab bag with the developers. Among the topics discussed, the devs gave some word about the next patch for the game — and something special that’s coming with it.

“We have a 1.123B version coming very soon to Pendragon that will have additional class changes to several classes that didn’t make it into the 1.123A notes AND tweaks to several of the changes made in 1.123A based on your feedback,” the team said. “Additionally, and the reason for the wait thus far, is that we are also introducing the new Mithril currency and shop. We were able to squeeze in an armor, cloak, and weapon ‘patterning’ system that will allow characters to copy the look of their existing items onto their other items (with some restrictions)!”

The team also fielded questions about resource crate changes, the myth physical defense stat, and scaling the UI to higher resolution monitors.

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The MOP Up: Revelation Online’s monthly challenges (June 4, 2017)

The MMO industry moves along at the speed of information, and sometimes we’re deluged with so much news here at Massively Overpowered that some of it gets backlogged. That’s why there’s The MOP Up: a weekly compilation of smaller MMO stories and videos that you won’t want to miss. Seen any good MMO news? Hit us up through our tips line!

This week we have stories and videos from Black DeathHellionAstellia OnlineOverwatchDayZPirate101Armored WarfareAionElder Scrolls OnlinePath of ExileDungeon Fighter OnlineWurm OnlineRevelation OnlineOsiris: New DawnDark Age of CamelotAge of Wushu 2, all waiting for you after the break!

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MMO Mechanics: Making healing interesting in MMORPGs

I was reading a recent Daily Grind article on the topic of unique healing classes and it prompted me to think about the variety of mechanics on offer for healing in MMOs that go beyond the World of Warcraft model. There are few MMO mechanics that run the risk of being diluted down by mods and add-ons in the way healing mechanics can be, which makes the area a fantastic area for a thought exercise in keeping healing interesting in MMORPGs.  Pair the lack of immersive interaction with the mechanics presented by the existence of click-heal and other ‘easy-heal’ overlays with many people’s general wish to be the more extroverted hero character instead of the less flashy but also very much needed party healer and it’s easy to see the need for more incentives to be presented by development teams.

In this edition of MMO Mechanics, I’ll take a look at some of the class suggestions from the Daily Grind article mentioned and will attempt to summarise what makes those classes so unique and interesting, hopefully in order to find a commonality between some that goes beyond the basic healing mechanics we know from more traditional MMOs.

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The Game Archaeologist: How Sceptre of Goth shaped the MMO industry

When it comes to text-based MMOs created in the ’80s, ’90s, and 2000s, the sheer number of them would blot out the sky. There are certainly more multi-user dungeons (MUDs) than I’ve ever been able to get a handle on when I’ve tried creating lists of the most important to know, but I will say that there are a few that seem to pop up more than others. The original MUD1, created by Richard Bartle and Roy Trubshaw, was certainly a watershed moment for online roleplaying games. Learning about DikuMUD is pretty essential, considering its impact on graphical MMORPGs that we still play today.

But there’s another title that often goes unnoticed, unless you keep an eye out for it. It’s a MUD that keeps popping up when you look into the history of the MMORPG genre, one with ties to key players and design concepts that are still active today.

It’s the MUD that shaped the MMO industry, and it was called Sceptre of Goth.

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Massively Overthinking: Disentangling MMO classes and races

Last week, a guildie of mine mentioned that he’d been interested in Crowfall until he realized he couldn’t be a gerbil (Guineacean) of the class of his choosing. It was a total coincidence that the Crowfall devs had literally that same week announced they were nuking their race/class-locked archetype system and disentangling races and classes, so I got to tell him his wish had been granted.

I think this pushes the game more solidly into MMORPG territory, so I’m happy to see it: More customization and choice and variety is what I’m all about. But I was going to play it before, too. For this week’s Massively Overthinking, I’m presenting the idea of locked vs. unlocked archetypes to our staff to mull over. How important is it to you to be able to play any race/class combo in a game? Is it something you see as critical to MMORPGs? Is archetype-locking more the domain of MOBAs and ARPGs? When do you let it slide to play a fun game?

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The Game Archaeologist: When Hellgate London got Flagshipped

It seems that it really wasn’t too long ago that I was filling in the time between night classes by boning up on video game news. I was drinking up all of the hot up-and-comers, such as Age of Conan and Warhammer Online, when I caught word that the maker of Diablo was trying to do the same thing again, only more online, in 3-D, and with a cool modern-day/futuristic/horror vibe.

There’s no better way to put it than to say that from the start, Hellgate: London looked all kinds of cool. Oh sure, you can scoff now with your perfect 20/20 hindsight, but I’m betting that more than a few of you thought the same with me around that time. Diablo but with guns and an online persistence — how could we not be intrigued? One of my most vivid memories was being torn between the idea of buying a lifetime subscription deal for $150 or not (again, this was before the free-to-play era, but also before the era of us spending the same money on alpha access. I’m just saying that you can’t judge me.).

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RIFT’s Starfall Prophecy name change was provoked by a trademark lawsuit

If you were a little bit puzzled by Trion’s announcement this week that it was changing the name of RIFT’s latest expansion from Starfall Prophecy to Prophecy of Ahnket because it had “recently become acquainted” with a children’s charity called Starfall, welp, get in line behind us. It turns out that there’s more to the story.

Massively OP tipster Clowd dug up a lawsuit that sheds light on what happened behind the scenes. A trademark lawsuit – Starfall Education Foundation v. Trion Worlds, Inc. (CN 1:2017cv00650) – was filed in a Colorado district court back in March but was apparently settled out of court at the tail end of April. Connecting the dots, one might assume Trion had been sued over the name and decided to change it as part of the settlement agreement, in a decision that wasn’t quite as amicable as the producer’s letter implied.

We reached out to Trion’s PR yesterday to ask whether it wished to amend its statement about the motivation behind the decision; in particular, we asked whether the trademark was checked prior to Starfall Prophecy’s launch, whether Trion believed it might have prevailed had it not settled, whether the free giveaway of the expansion was part of the settlement or merely a marketing move, and why, if Trion was prepared to change the name, an agreement wasn’t reached prior to the filing of a lawsuit.

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Dark Age of Camelot’s Dragon’s Curse campaign moves into its second chapter

Evil rumors and foul deeds continue to ramp up in Dark Age of Camelot. The RvR MMO moved into the second chapter of its A Dragon’s Cruse campaign on Tuesday, expanding the open world dungeons that debuted in the first chapter.

Chapter two unlocked the full potential for these new dungeons, giving players more to do and see as they seek to uncover the truth behind recent events. There are several new dungeon quests available, including solo quests, small-group elite quests, large-group battlegroup quests, variable group size campaign quests. The vendors servicing these dungeons have new offerings as well.

A Dragon’s Curse is a planned year-long story arc in DAoC that will conclude in December. The third chapter is scheduled to arrive on May 30th.

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