nightfall

Learn about the history of the Crystal Desert for Guild Wars 2’s future

The focal point of Guild Wars 2: Path of Fire will be Elona and the Crystal Desert. Do you not know what the Crystal Desert is? Then get out. You have some Guild Wars to play, including a lot of Nightfall, which is going to bring you into Vabbi and it’ll be so great. Or… all right, you could just watch the lore video from the Krytan Herald down below to get a brief overview of the region’s history and what it means now instead of playing through all of that.

You could also do both, though.

Assuming you’re going with the video option, you can catch that just below to get a nice big dose of Tyrian lore with excellent imagery and narration. It’s the sort of backstory that will be very useful to understand what the hell you’re hoping to accomplish in Path of Fire, as well as knowing why this region is so important to veterans of the original game. You can also check out our team’s thoughts and our columnist’s thoughts on the expansion announcement for a bit more context.

Read more

Guild Wars 2: Loot rumors, RNG grumblings, character boosters, and map spoilers

Guild Wars 2 Path of Fire detail rumors are swirling as info (and disinfo) is trickling back from the test environment. Here’s a few of the more interesting bits (we’re tucking spoilers behind spoiler tags, so don’t sweat it).

It appears that the shared inventory slot granted with Heart of Thorns will indeed stack with the shared slot granted by Path of Fire, which is a nice little bonus ANet didn’t hype, given how much those account-wide slots are worth. The character boost tokens also appear to stack with each other.

Click to reveal potential spoilers about gear
An image floating around Discord has led players to suspect that gear drops in the expansion may arrive in our inventories as stackable, unidentified items rather than predetermined items that clog up inventory. This would be a giant step forward for the game’s drop and inventory system, at least if our commenters in today’s coincidental Daily Grind are any judge!

Read more

Check out trailers for all Guild Wars 2’s Path of Fire elite class specs, mounts, and Elona

Yesterday, ArenaNet formally revealed Path of Fire, Guild Wars 2’s second expansion in five years. This standalone, campaign-like expansion won’t introduce a new class, but it will roll out a new elite specialization for all nine of the existing classes, just as Heart of Thorns did. It’ll also add mounts that we’ll be using to romp around parts of the nostalgia-laced Elona desert from Nightfall.

Since the stream, the studio has released videos of damn near everything. Let’s dig in.

Read more

Everything you need to know about Guild Wars 2’s Path of Fire expansion, launching September 22

If you missed the stream this morning or just want all the goodies in one place, here’s what we know about Guild Wars 2’s Path of Fire expansion!

  • It’s called Path of Fire! It launches on September 22nd, and everyone, even non-players, is invited to a preview weekend this next weekend. (Just roll a F2P base account now.) Yes, you’ll get to play with a mount during that preview.
  • You’ll be able to buy this expansion standalone, even if you don’t have HOT. It’ll run $29.99 by itself or $49.99 as a bundle with HOT. You can prepurchase already on the official site, and yep, there are lots of goodies included if you buy the upgraded $59.99 and $79.99 packages. A level 80 upgrade is included with all boxes, but if you want an extra character slot, you’ll need the higher packages. (Current consensus among commenters is that the price is fair and the upgrades are worth it.)
  • Lore-wise, the expansion picks up right where season 3 just ended, with no gap in the plot and a heavy focus on Balthazar as the villain. “Seamless” is the word they used.
  • The location of the expansion is the Crystal Desert and parts of Elona (Vabbi, and so forth) from Guild Wars 1 Nightfall. It’ll be nostalgia, but still accessible for newcomers.

Read more

Working As Intended: Why classic Guild Wars matters, 12 years in

The spring season always sees a deluge of MMORPG birthday celebrations: Lord of the Rings Online, City of Heroes, Allods Online, Free Realms last week and TERA and EVE Online this week. Lost in the din, however, is Guild Wars — classic Guild Wars, ArenaNet’s original MMO, which released in 2005 against World of Warcraft, performed brilliantly, and let up only once Guild Wars 2 itself was underway. Even though it’s now clinging to life in a permanent sort of maintenance mode, I still consider it one of the best MMORPGs ever made, in spite of the fact that it’s missing several things I’d normally consider vital for an MMO. And in this week’s video edition of my Working As Intended column, I’m going to tell you why.

Read more

Battle Bards Episode 89: Nightfall

When the sun goes down, the Battle Bards’ work has just begun! In this week’s episode, the crew explores nighttime music cues in MMOs, chasing the ever-elusive feel of what that period between dusk and dawn sounds like in game. Don’t fall asleep!

Battle Bards is a bi-weekly podcast that alternates between examining a single MMO’s soundtrack and exploring music tracks revolving around a theme. MOP’s Justin co-hosts with bloggers Steff and Syl. The cast is available on iTunes, Google Play, TuneInPocket CastsStitcher, and Player.FM.

We’ve got Episode 89: Nightfall and the show notes for you after the break!

Read more

Jukebox Heroes: Massively OP’s guide to grabbing 120+ MMO soundtracks

One of the most common questions that I’m asked from my adoring throngs on the street is, “Justin, where oh where can I get some of these marvelous MMO soundtracks that you talk about all of the time?” OK, that just never happens (on the street, that is), but people are often curious how they can go about starting to amass an MMO soundtrack collection or where to find their favorite album.

The sad truth is that so much music from these games is never officially released in any capacity, which is why I scour YouTube for fan rips of the music files. However, every so often I do discover a studio release somewhere, and I try to keep an up-to-date log on these to help others in their quest for video game scores.

So in the spirit of Christmas and sharing, today I’m going to show you how you can get your ears on more than 120 soundtracks and scores from MMOs, MOBAs, and other online titles — some of which are free and legal for the taking. You’re welcome; don’t mention it!

Read more

Massively Overthinking: Our favorite MMORPG soundtracks

MOP’s Justin Olivetti created the music-centered Jukebox Heroes column back on Massively-that-was and brought it along to us here, and to this day it’s one of my favorites. It’s also one of our most contentious, which might seem weird since it covers not pay-to-win or crowdfunding or internet warlords but… music. Video game music. It turns out that you folks have incredibly strong opinions about your video game music, and not a top 10 list of tracks goes by when Justin isn’t barraged with “you forgot X” and “why isn’t Y on this list” and “obviously bias, doesn’t include X” commentary.

So for this week’s Massively Overthinking, we’re turning the whole team’s attention to video game music — specifically, MMORPG soundtracks and individual pieces. Which ones are our very favorites? Which ones do we keep on listening to long after we’ve left the games? We’re confident you’ll populate the comments with everything we’re missing!

Read more

Happy birthday, classic Guild Wars

Classic Guild Wars turned 11 years old this week, and I’m sorry to say that by the time you read this, the in-game party will already have ended. But! YouTuber WoodenPotatoes did a modern unboxing video of the classic Guild Wars trilogy’s collector editions that should satisfy your nostalgia. Even if you’re not a Guild Wars fan, you still may find the flip-through of mid-2000s NCsoft catalogues a treat. Plus, you gotta see 12-year-old Colin Johanson talk on the Nightfall making-of video. Memories.

Read more

Spellcheck won’t help you in TERA’s new Seek & Spell event

Live with TERA’s maintenance patch today is an contest-slash-event En Masse is calling Seek & Spell, so: Dictionaries at the ready!

For the next three weeks, TERA players will earn event boxes by tackling endbosses in dungeons and emerging victorious from battlegrounds. The boxes will be assigned a letter from the words “secrets,” “shadows,” and “enchanting”; combine lettered boxes to spell those words and you’ll pick up a prize.

“SECRETS—Completing this word produces a prize box containing either a Nightfall costume, a ninja-themed accessory, or other consumables.

SHADOWS—Completing this word produces a prize box containing either a Bloodshadow costume, a ninja-themed accessory, or other consumables.

ENCHANTING—Completing this word produces an Enchanting Event Box containing a tier 8 or tier 9 enchanting scroll, or other enchanting materials.”

Extra letters can be transformed into tickets that enter players into a drawing for real-world prizes, including statues and CE boxes of the game.

Comment

The Game Archaeologist: Guild Wars Utopia

Aztecs. Chronomancers. Mounts. Halberds. Golems. Dual wielding.

These are all but a hint of what a fourth Guild Wars campaign could have been, a campaign that was under development in the mid-2000s but was scrapped by 2007. Replacing it was the expansion Guild Wars: Eye of the North and the workings of a super-secret sequel to the game (which you’ve probably never heard of). It was the forgotten campaign, swept under a rug while it was still under the rug.

But what if, in some alternative timeline, ArenaNet had gone ahead with this campaign? What if it had become an established part of the Guild Wars legacy, as familiar to us today as Nightfall and Factions?

What if Guild Wars Utopia had lived?

Read more

Perfect Ten: Awesome (and unique) MMORPG classes

Class-based systems are one of those holdovers from tabletop RPGs that work surprisingly well in MMOs. I basically put up with class systems in exactly one tabletop game simply because Dungeons & Dragons is likely to abandon classes around the same time that the Earth crashes into the sun and Fifth Edition is pretty good, and the debate over whether MMOs work better with classes and levels or freeform character development systems will still be raging even then.

Even though I’m wholly on board with classes, a surprising number of games wind up trotting out the same basic groups time and again. Here’s the warrior with a two-hander and a big weapon, here’s the caster flinging fireballs, there’s the stealthy guy with paired weapons who stabs things. A lot of those can be really fun to play, too. But my affection always goes toward the odd, the unusual, the classes that you can’t find in many games. Like these classes, basically.

Read more

1 2