subscription

Subscription MMOs are generally those that restrict play to gamers who pay an ongoing fee, usually monthly, though shorter and longer subscriptions, as well as lifetime subs, do exist. Some free-to-play and buy-to-play games also include optional subscriptions.

EVE Online community donates 3.7 million PLEX to family of fallen developer

Last fall, one of EVE Online’s senior software engieers passed away at the age of 35, leaving a hole in the team’s heart. While the studio created a special ship SKIN to memorialize CCP Blaze, there was more that the company and community felt that could be done.

Funds were raised to support his fiancée and one-year-old daughter which resulted in an “astonishing, unparalleled” success. The community donated over 3.7 million PLEX — 620 years of game time — to the family, making it the second-largest fundraiser ever to happen in CCP’s history.

“It’s honestly not possible for us to find words that would accurately convey the gratitude we feel to our pilots,” CCP said. “Once again, the EVE community has shown that despite differences in game, our pilots are a formidable, and indestructible force for good.”

Source: EVE Online

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The Daily Grind: Is ‘naming-and-shaming’ MMO cheaters a good idea?

Last week on Reddit, an EVE Online player begged CCP to organize a wall of shame for botters – essentially an online list of those caught cheating, with character names and corps to boot. This, he argued, would not only prove to the community that cheaters were being banned but allow players to “self-police” those corps “actively harbouring bots.”

You’re probably making a face right now imagining just what EVE players might do with such a list, but then again, we’re talking about botters here. I’m more curious whether you folks actually believe those are effective or a good idea in general. Several EVE players said it’d never happen because of European laws, but in fact we’ve written articles about multiple MMO studios naming-and-shaming cheaters: Guild Wars 2, Riders of Icarus, H1Z1, Tree of Savior, and Mechwarrior Online, just to name the first five I found by searching the last three years of our own site.

Is “naming-and-shaming” MMO cheaters with a “wall of shame” a good idea, or should studios that famously ban the wrong people maybe stay away from painting targets on customers’ backs?

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Global Chat: Jumping on board the Warframe train

Are you playing Warframe these days? If not, you might be missing out on the growing party of people who seem to be flocking to Digital Extremes’ free-to-play shooter. Plenty of bloggers continue to discover and extol the virtues of this game, even years after it first hit the scene.

“The game’s been around for several years now,” said Nomadic Gamer, “so there’s a lot of maturity in the advice community and when people ask for ‘best builds’ they can be referred to builds created years ago.”

In An Age considers Warframe to be his “‘I don’t know what I feel like doing’ and ‘I only have 30 minutes to play’ game.” And while Superior Realities felt like the game was only “meh,” he did recognize the powerful effect of that word-of-mouth is having with this title.

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One Shots: Poppin’ some bubbly

We are going to kick off this week’s exhibition of player screenshots with a few email submissions (yes, some of you still email them in, and bless you for it!).

It doesn’t take much of an excuse for a celebration to break out in Final Fantasy XIV, as Souseiseki notes: “A certain Miqo’te had a little too much fun celebrating Heavensturn (and too much to drink!). Although, I think she had more fun opening the bottles than actually drinking them! Fortunately, I had the foresight to hide the good stuff. Don’t worry, her chocobo was parked safe in the stables and we confiscated her saddle.”

Postscript: That chocobo was later seen perched high on top of a temple summit, wrapped in toilet paper and spray painted with an incomprehensible slogan.

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Whatever happened to Ascent: the Space Game, Aura Kingdom, and Fragmented?

Ever pause during your day and find yourself wondering, “Whatever happened to that game?” With hundreds upon hundreds of online titles these days, it’s surprisingly easy for MMOs to fall through the cracks and become buried as more aggressive or active games take the spotlight.

Well, every so often we here at Massively Overpowered find ourselves curious what has transpired with certain MMOs that we haven’t heard from in quite a while. Have we missed the action and notices? Has the game gone into stealth maintenance mode? What’s the deal? What has it been up to lately?

That’s when we put on our detective hats and go sleuthing. Today we look at what has been going on with Ascent: the Space Game, Aura Kingdom, and Fragmented.

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Fan creates a Final Fantasy XIV UI in Final Fantasy XI

For those of you who were wondering when Final Fantasy XI started supporting add-ons… it didn’t. The game has never supported add-ons, and using Windower and its associated add-ons is totally not allowed and could get you banned. Except that it won’t, and functionally no one is particularly concerned about it. So you have players who use the software and its various functions to do awesome stuff like turn the game’s interface into the interface from Final Fantasy XIV.

Obviously, it’s not a perfect translation; FFXI is a very menu-driven game and FFXIV is not, there are lots of different mechanics at play, and the hotbars alone are a rather experimental bit of additional coding. But it’s pretty neat to see the older game gussied up to look like its newer cousin. And if you want something to slightly ease the adaptation curve, you could do worse.

This is what add-ons exist to do.

Source: Reddit

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Town State Leisure: Camelot Unchained responds to absurd scraper article as only CSE can

If by chance you’ve ever run a blog about literally anything, you surely know about scrapers – those jerks who use scripts to steal your stuff in full and put it on their site to make easy money. The really clever ones use scripts to also change some of the words around so that it’s not as easy to get caught. Most of these scripts aren’t very good and just use word swaps, so they sound like somebody who barely speaks English grabbed a thesaurus and waved it around in the air.

Enter Owne Tech, a scraper site you’ve probably never heard of. Yesterday, when Camelot Unchained’s huge news hit the internet, this site apparently scraped VentureBeat’s piece on it and… well, the garbled version is actually hilarious.

“The previous writer of Mythic Leisure’s The Darkish Age of Camelot is again with a brand new recreation, and he has raised $7.five million for the net fable recreation dubbed Camelot Unchained,” the piece declares. “Jacobs was once the lead clothier and founder at Mythic. […] He left EA in 2009, and began the brand new corporate, Town State Leisure, in 2011. Via 2013, he had found out what he sought after to do. His Town State Leisure raised $four.five million in a Kickstarter crowdfunding marketing campaign, and his staff went to paintings on Camelot Unchained.”

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Massively Overthinking: Tackling our hoarding problem in MMORPGs

By coincidence, two articles in my feeds this past week both centered on video game hoarding – not hoarding the actual games but hoarding stuff inside of them. Blizzard Watch posted a piece on what makes people stop hoarding things like currency in Blizzard’s games, while Gamasutra published an article about how game designers can stop turning us into hoarders in the first place.

For this week’s Overthinking, I thought it would be constructive for the staff and readers to reflect on hoarding in MMOs specifically. Do you hoard, and if so, is it primarily consumables? Currencies? Event items? Something else? Do you think it’s a problem, or only when it’s encouraged as part of a microtransaction loop that ends with your buying more storage?

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Final Fantasy XIV launches patch 4.2 on January 30

The next patch for Final Fantasy XIV arrives on January 30th, and that naturally means a whole lot of content for players to explore. It does not mean that you’ll be able to purchase a new house right away, however. House purchasing for the six new wards added to all four districts will be enabled a week after the patch, and at first it will be oriented toward free companies only. There will also be new restrictions in place so that each player can have one personal house and one free company house per server, so hoarding houses on alts won’t be possible. We’ll find out more as housing draws closer.

And that’s just one of the many things in place for the patch; there are also job adjustments, more glamour options, and the complete removal of elemental properties. Yes, elemental materia is being removed, and players in Eureka (which is coming in 4.2.5) will have an entirely new system based around elemental changes and a new advancement board. If you’re just interested in seeing what the game has to offer in terms of visuals and teases of the story, of course, you can check that out just below in the full trailer for the patch.

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World of Warcraft will be down most of today fixing patch 7.3.5’s bugs (Aaaaaand it’s back)

So, has World of Warcraft seemed a bit more… buggy to you lately? Because there have been some notable bugs since the whole worldwide level scaling thing. There’s the unintentional raid boss health bump; there’s an unintended issue wherein enemies in Heroic dungeons have less health than the normal scaled version. It’s kind of a mess, and that’s why the game is undergoing another round of maintenance today starting at 10:00 a.m. EST. Yep, on a Friday.

It’s going to be a long maintenance, too, running until 6:00 p.m. EST, so hopefully you didn’t have the day off with plans for an extended session in the game. There’s no official word about what will be changed in maintenance, although there are obviously several possible bugs to be patched out. We’ll see what’s getting changed when we see the list of updates today, but considering that the original patch ran long on maintenance, don’t be surprised if today runs longer than expected as well.

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EVE Online’s upwell structures get a wellness upgrade

Some of EVE Online’s player-built space platforms — known as upwell structures — are getting a massive upgrade in the game’s upcoming February update. This Upwell Structures 2.0 is a “significant” package of improvements that should be on the test servers soon.

So what do these changes and improvements contain? CCP outlined four pillars of the new upwell structure design: different power modes, a vulnerability and reinforcement system, a major structure combat overhaul, and moon mining in wormhole space and some highsec systems. There are also numerous smaller tweaks in the works for these platforms, like properly displaying damage messages, a short “fitting invulnerable” state during deployment, and riskier asset safety settings.

And because this is EVE Online, you shouldn’t be surprised that there’s a flowchart associated with these structures and their new status states. We’ve got it for you below, and we guarantee it will be the most exciting flow chart you read all day.

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World of Warcraft confirms that raid boss health bump is a mistake and being fixed

It was sort of a smack in the face to go to old raids in World of Warcraft yesterday. Not in the slap-in-the-face disrespectful sense, but in the sense of just being extremely surprising. Every raid boss was suddenly sporting way too much health, and some more recent raids were suddenly impossible to beat at level 110 with decent gear. What the heck? Were we never meant to do Mists of Pandaria raids solo, even when they got patched to make it easier to solo some of them?

The answer is that it’s not you; it was an error. Due to the changes made to health calculation with the patch, raid bosses wound up with far more health than they were meant to have, and the team is looking into how to fix the issue, especially for raids in Mists of Pandaria and Warlords of Draenor. So you might have to wait a little longer for your transmog farming runs, but it’s a known issue that is getting addressed and fixed.

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Camelot Unchained lands $7.5M investment to hasten development: Our chat with Mark Jacobs on funding, VR, and beta one

If you know one thing about indie MMORPG Camelot Unchained, it’s that CEO Mark Jacobs appears to dwell perpetually in internet comment sections amiably sparring with gamers and attracting loyal advocates.

But if you know two things, you also know that the game is late. Really late. The RvR-centric, PvM-free, anti-lockbox, sub-only MMO was supposed to enter beta three years ago, according to its successful 2013 Kickstarter, but studio City State Entertainment suffered admitted setbacks along the way – both hiring difficulties in the company’s Fairfax, Virginia, location and technical hurdles. Much of that has since been rectified; in 2016, the company launched a second studio in Seattle while continuing to hire engineers and spending the better part of a year completely refactoring its character ability code and polishing up its home-grown engine. But here we are in 2018, still mumbling beta when? at Jacobs and his dogged crew.

Well, we’re finally getting an answer to that question and more, along with a significant blast of hope for the future of the game, as CSE has just received a massive cash infusion to speed up development. I spoke to Jacobs at length – he’s infamous for being effusive – about what’s going on with the game and the studio in 2018. Read on for the executive summary!

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