Top 25 companies accounted for 65 percent of 2014’s $83.6 billion games market

    
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Twenty-five companies accounted for 65 percent of the $83.6 billion games market in 2014, according to a report at Newzoo. Leading the pack was Tencent, the megalithic Chinese publisher, followed by Sony, Microsoft, Electronic Arts, and Activision-Blizzard.

Tencent experienced 37 percent growth last year, while additional firms with MMO ties including Nexon, Square-Enix, and NCsoft placed in Newzoo’s top 25.

[Source: Newzoo]
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Kayweg
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Kayweg

Off to google Tencent.

Ponyprincess
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Ponyprincess

On no, Blizzard is not on the first place?

Enikuo
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Enikuo

Estranged Enikuo SallyBowls1 Lateris JesLyck And, now I have a picture of gamers yelling video game commands in Starbucks :)
(not because they need to yell, but because gamers get excited)

Enikuo
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Enikuo

Estranged SallyBowls1 Lateris JesLyck It makes sense that mobile gaming and PC gaming might exist on the same hardware, at some point, since mobile devices are just tiny computers anyway. You could have the portability of mobile and the luxury of better peripherals and input devices at home. But, if you’re basically using your phone like a laptop or mini PC, is it really fair to say mobile took over?
Also, there’s the issue of game makers always pushing technology to do new things with games, which requires more power. Procedural generation, more intelligent AI, higher fidelity – all of these things require more and more power. For example, how about a high-fidelity, procedurally generated 4X game with drop-in/drop-out virtual reality. I don’t know, it seems like there’s a lot of headroom for growth all around and doesn’t seem like it’s really an either/or situation for PC and mobile, at least in gaming. 
That said, maybe the Star Citizen guy is right that game makers have lost interest in pushing the technological boundaries. I hope not though.

Zulika_Mi_Nam
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Zulika_Mi_Nam

I assume many reading the comments here are interested in gaming business stats/finances.  I stumbled upon on story on this a few weeks ago and this may be a good place to bring it up.

Someone recently came up with a tool to view some of the info available from the Steam web API.  It is pretty cool to play with – you can look at games by country and year, genre, etc by using the left pop-out banner. The about for the page talks to how the data is gathered and its accuracy.

http://steamspy.com/

SallyBowls1
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SallyBowls1

jefreahard SallyBowls1 Lateris JesLyck Dying does not mean gone tomorrow – you, me and the sun are dying. Mainframes are still a multibillion dollar business decades later.  PC Gamers will be spending billions of dollars for many decades. And Empire on my iPad is recognizable to someone who played it on a Caltech minicomputer four decades ago. 

Businesses and the investors who fund them look to growth.  High growth is not a strength of the PC gaming market,  certainly not relative to mobile.

Re “PC gaming takes power out of the hands of publishers and puts it into the hands of consumers” I really see the business environment differently.  In a mature market, I would expect consolidation and the EAs and Activision-Blizzards to gain market share at the expense of the smaller but especially midsize.  The Windows store will probably accelerate that.  IMO, it is the multinational gaming companies who will be best able to negotiate with Microsoft as well as get their products noticed amongst the hundreds of thousands of games available.

SallyBowls1
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SallyBowls1

UnDeAdKiTtY But not enough to get too close to Nexon, right?

SallyBowls1
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SallyBowls1

SoMuchMass I wouldn’t be surprised to see it for a lot of industries. the “80/20” rule. CellPhones, cell providers, search engines, operating systems, soft drinks, computers, cpus, databases, shipping companies most industries I thought of off the top of my head are much more concentrated.

SallyBowls1
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SallyBowls1

Slightly related since it is mobile.  

Today is ‘Mobilegeddon’ – Google is  adding mobile-friendliness to the list of factors that affect and effect rank. So if this site were not mobile friendly, then its rank in a Google search by a #PCMASTERRACE person searching on a PC would be lower, resulting in less clicks and revenue to this site. 

http://tech.slashdot.org/story/15/04/21/1357249/mobilegeddon-google-to-punish-mobile-hostile-sites-starting-today

P.S. An example in Raph’s community talk is that someone who types in abortion in inland NC gets very different search results than someone in San Francisco – Google filters the world they see.

tl;dr: mobile is important and and Google has a lot of power.

SallyBowls1
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SallyBowls1

Dnote jefreahard SallyBowls1 Lateris JesLyck Actually this year it looks like mobile market is largest.  The trend lines may have crossed a few months ago or a few months in the future, but the slopes are clearly different.