Smedley: We will support EQ and EQII ‘for the very long haul’

    
76
EverQuest II

“I firmly believe the days of the WoW-style MMO are over,” Daybreak’s John Smedley told GI.biz earlier this week. Apparently that ruffled a few feathers in Norrath, since Smedley felt compelled to clarify the remark on Reddit this afternoon.

“Don’t mistake that comment for me not believing in raiding or knowing that there are a ton of people that play MMOs that still absolutely love to do it! We also plan on continuing to support EQ, and EQ2 for the very long haul and providing exactly the kind of cool content our players have expected. None of that is changing.

However, when we’re choosing what new games to make we’re focused on games with shorter average session lengths. Why? Because that’s the way the gaming world has evolved and we need to adapt.”

[Source: Reddit; thanks Kinya!]
newest oldest most liked
Subscribe to:
Dargnon
Guest
Dargnon

SOE, or in other words, Smedley’s company, is a brave bunch of inventors. Thait is a fact. They have done things in EQ, SWG or PS that others had hard time copying.

They have shut down a lot of MMOs, because these were not profitable, that is a truth as well.

And if they are going to keep supporting their signature games EQ and EQ2, it is only good both for us and them. You might want to considers playing other their games, look at the track record, but for EverQuest, I think you are safe.

FlyinDutchman
Guest
FlyinDutchman

I think it’s a double edged sword, and a case of people not knowing what they want. 

You have all these GEN 1 MMO players who spent their teens and 20’s staying up all night and putting in 40 hour gaming sessions fueled on caffeine and pizza. What you had for them were WORLDS, games that were hard-core to the max and games you HAD to devote your life to…. and people ate it up. They LOVED it, they spent years on-line meeting and playing with people, meeting life-long friends, and wives, and creating awesome communities that transformed a small hobby into a multi billion dollar industry. 

But now those people don’t have the time to put in they used to. So Dev’s give them chopped up content, low-entry barriers, and steam-lined games so they can fit in some gaming between putting the kids to bed and watching Game of Thrones with the Mrs. 

The problem is WE DON’T WANT those games. We have them, by the bucket-full. We are drowning in crappy lobby based games, that you can hop into for 20 mins, down a boss or two then log-off. It’s seems like it’s exactly what we need and want…. but it’s not, and it never has been.

beardzerker
Guest
beardzerker

Dude. Yeah. That.

Radfist
Guest
Radfist

melissamcdon 
“I’ve read some of the threads about my comments in that interview. I wanted to clarify what I was talking about. I was asked in the interview about what things we’re doing differently for our new games going forward and that’s when I said we’re focused on shorter session times because not many people have the time anymore to spend on a 4 hour raid.
Don’t mistake that comment for me not believing in raiding or knowing that there are a ton of people that play MMOs that still absolutely love to do it! We also plan on continuing to support EQ, and EQ2 for the very long haul and providing exactly the kind of cool content our players have expected. None of that is changing.
However, when we’re choosing what new games to make we’re focused on games with shorter average session lengths. Why? Because that’s the way the gaming world has evolved and we need to adapt. That’s precisely why we aimed so high on Everquest Next. We know we needed to change our aim on these games. We can’t just expect our users to want to grind through an epic 8 hour raid encounter or treat these games like it’s a second job. We need to make sure our games are just as fun in smaller time increments.
That’s the entirety of what I was talking about. It’s not a comment on today’s games. It’s a comment on today’s reality and where we are aiming at least some of our games.
We remain majorly committed to producing great content for our EQ and EQ2 players for a long time to come, and rest assured there is going to be plenty of content for EQN players as well including raids and all the stuff players have come to know and love in these games.
Smed”
He talks a lot about EQN in the full transcript.

Reht
Guest
Reht

beardzerker 
Yes, they have less resources than before, but i stand by my comment in regards to EQ1, i can’t speak to EQ2 since i have barely played it.  Instead of investing time in fixing bugs, new content, etc.  They keep doing things that they feel improve the game that keeps taking them further and further from the game that most of remember and that much fewer of us still play.

Here are a couple of things:

-We get months spent on an advanced looting system (a unnecessary quality of life addition to a 15 year old game) that is so complicated most of the folks in my guild do not use it.  
-They told us that they heard the players when we complained about staggered releases during the Call of Forsaken expansion.  All of a sudden, we are right back to two small expansions twice a year instead of one large one a year.  While it sounds silly, one large expansion a year is more healthy for a large raiding guild than 2 small ones if you only get 3-4 raids per release, that’s not enough content for a full night’s raiding once if farm mode.
-They build Heroic Adventures (random step missions in an instance, similar to LDoNs but more advanced) , while a good idea, most of them sucked and were either not fun and/or incredibly buggy.
-Fast forward to the next expansion release, they don’t like how people play the same 3-4 Heroic Adventures in constant succession.  So they add 6 hour lock out timers and remove most of the exp from the npcs in the instance and add it to the completion reward.  They also made some changes to exp earned in a couple of previous expansion zones making it terrible for people to level past 100 (new expansion added levels 101-105).  While this isn’t a terrible change at face value, it did make experience so bad for people 101+ that they weren’t leveling with people below 101 in those zones.  They have since reverted or reduced the penalties, but this is the first time that they have tried to actively force people to level in new content.
-We were promised a bigger expansion by smed and got a crappy 8 zone, 7 raid full expansion.  Now they have less resources but claim they are going to give us almost the same amount of content as a full expansion but split into two.   This is smart on their part since they probably had some zones that weren’t ready or pulled from the previous expansion in advance of the sale of SOE (that didn’t happen overnight).

I can keep going, but i am hoping you get the gist.

carsont
Guest
carsont

aelious Whew!

carsont
Guest
carsont

JohnD212 Ugh I hope not!

beardzerker
Guest
beardzerker

Reht beardzerker Kageokami, oTQ I agree with you partially. I played EQ when it first came out (holy crap that makes me feel old) and EQ2 has earned my-favorite-game-of-all-time crown, however I haven’t even purchased Altar of Malice and have zero interest in buying the Rum Cellar. It bums me out, but having read what players are saying and what the official website says, it just doesn’t seem like a quality purchase. There are SO many great games out now, and when you compare them, just doesn’t seem worth it anymore. 

I don’t think they are out of touch, I just think they are trying what they can with a small amount of resources to keep existing players fed with new stuff. There is only so much you can do with an old horse.

carsont
Guest
carsont

melissamcdon I wondered the same thing. I hope it’s still on the table, but there’s so much talk of Landmark (zero interest), and news of EQN is so scarce..

carsont
Guest
carsont

jackofrost Too true. I play in smaller sessions now because I’m older, have other priorities etc. But the thing is… why are NEW players also playing in smaller sessions (assuming that’s true if the average has dropped).

You would think that if new players came in to replace the old, their long sessions would continue as the old ones erm… died out (let’s say died down!). But that doesn’t sound like it’s the case… either there aren’t enough new players to replace the old ones that are either leaving or playing less (entirely possible), or they are playing for shorter times and if so, why?

Maybe it’s because there’s so much more variety. Instead of playing the single MMO that’s out there for 21 hours a week, they are play 3 for 7 or 7 for 3 or whatever…

Total time is the same, it’s just spread out more.