Star Trek Online flame wars erupt over gay backdrop NPCs

    
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Can't we have this dramatic showdown in space?
The most recent featured episode for Star Trek Online stirred up some controversy because it’s all about gay Klingons. By which we of course mean that there’s a lesbian couple attending a fight purely as a background element without any particular attention drawn to it. Unsurprisingly, people have expressed anger at the inclusion on the game’s forums, prompting community manager LaughingTrendy to step in and point out that the couple is hardly a focal point of the episode and then step in again to keep the discussion civil rather than nasty on both sides.

The episode’s writer has opted to respond on Twitter with a simple “sorry not sorry,” so make of that what you will. Fans upset by the inclusion may wish to be reminded that while the game hasn’t shown such relationships explicitly in the past, the franchise has released several episodes over the years to establish that same-sex relationships are seen as normal and it takes extraordinary circumstances for them to be highlighted.

Source: Forum Post #1, Forum Post #2, Twitter; thanks to Some Guy and Russell for the tips!
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xurocca
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xurocca

melissamcdon EagleScoutDJB Shadanwolf Okay.. but wrong.. according to who? Who is the objective, unbiased entity that determines what is “truly” moral?

God? The comsmos? Hitler?

Does a general concensus of humans constitute what is morally superior? Do animals get to decide? Does the brutal Mother Nature have a say?

And aren’t there plenty of ways even a general concensus could fail to get it “right”, whatever “right” even is? Does the zeitgeist of the times matter or is morality something that is timeless?

Consider a mirror universe like that presented in Star Trek. Are all those people wrong or right?

This is the reason for relativism. Most of us have a general idea of what we interpret as right and wrong, nevermind that we might even share these vague sort of collective opinions on morality, it’s never 100%, and even if it were, how do we know it’s infallible?

The best you can do is declare X is evil and then interpret situations from that declaration. We do that now, imperfectly, with consensus and laws. IMO, the actors (prosecutors, judge, defendent), as well as the laws, in these cases all have a bias, and not towards morality or truth, as some might like to believe.

I think most of us try to adhere to the golden rule as a basic principle of ethics, yet not everyone, not all the time, and most importantly, even this most basic of ideals is interpreted differently by different people, both purposefully and unintentionally.

I don’t think you can have a misguided idea unless you have a target, for which, there is an absolute best way to go about achieving that goal, in space and time, given a specific set of objectives. I would agree with that.

So I don’t disagree with you, in practice, but there is no absolute, infallible morality to be found in the physical universe. Maybe under theological conditions.

GoJammit
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GoJammit

Meme? Are we talking about the same thing? By Hollywood glitz, I was referring to the high number of well known actors thrown into it. And at 7 years old when I saw it originally, I had never seen test footage so it was more than effective for me. I lived in Korea so and the practice air raid siren sound very much like the end of the world. Nightmares. It screwed me up big time. For a long time. Any time that movie came on I had to watch it and it messed me up all over again. It wasn’t until my senior year of highs hook when I was forced to watch it in class and confront all of the things it got wrong that I was able to get over it. But the mark had already been left.
That said, threads scared me as an adult. It was even more low budget and was made in a very bland British way. It’s the best way I can describe it. It seems the British did not care for frills and such in a lot of things. They didn’t bother with phony nukes. They used real mushroom clouds in the background but what they did at the people level and the aftermath is what got you.
In short, where The Day After left you with the question of is there anyone out there, Threads answers that question and makes you wish you hadn’t asked.

HanRasmussen
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HanRasmussen

GoJammit Cosmic Cleric There was nothing “Hollywood Glitz” about The Day After, that meme needs to die. It was a television movie so high budget special effects weren’t gonna happen and the movie was every bit as grim as it needed to be. The bombing sequence mixed what cheap special effects shots they could afford with archive footage of real nuclear destruction in military bomb tests. and remains brutally effective. The aftermath was bleak indeed, with a few uninjured survivors making a makeshift burn ward in a blown out building, the few healthy trying in vain to treat a small sea of beds (cots, really) filled with the dying, with no equipment or supplies while one character called out on a radio:

“Is there anyone alive out there? Any other survivors, please respond…”

GoJammit
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GoJammit

Cosmic Cleric GoJammit It would be a long road if it happened at all. There is a movie, probably the starkest, most depressing view of the world after a nuclear war. It’s called Threads, while it didn’t have all of the Hollywood glitz of The Day After that came right before it, this British made film really got to the meat of it. n the Day After you say a few days after actually. Threads goes out years of seeing the world still fucked beyond reason. Just the scene of the woman standing in the middle of the square pissing herself while the world is coming undone around her was tough to deal with. 
It’s an old 1980’s flick and I think you can even watch the whole thing on youtube. Just have a puppy or a clown in the room with you when you see it. From the way people describe Schindler’s list, I imagine this is right up there on the depression level.

Cosmic Cleric
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Cosmic Cleric

mysecretid GoJammit I always thought it would be pretty hard to have an invention like warp drive come into existence right after a global nuclear war/post-apoc scenario, so I always had problems with that part of the Star Trek lore.
Using an analogy, could someone invent warp drive after the end of the series The Walking Dead, timeline wise?
Always figured you need a certain amount of civilization resources to be able to do grand inventions. /shrug

Cosmic Cleric
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Cosmic Cleric

GoJammit “Whether it is nuclear war or some great natural disaster I think a planet
has to literally rise from the ashes before they learn to act right.
They need to know what it is like to nearly be snuffed out, to have to
stare extinction in the face for just a moment, before realizing we are
one.”
I’m a little concerned though about our ability to recover from one of our f-ups, be it climate change, pollution, war, etc.
And then, I worry about our sense of memory, to fail to remember history is to repeat it, etc. etc.
Having said all that, I think we’ll be ok (enough).  I always wondered if an advanced civilization has to move from their home planet to another one, because they’ve trashed their home world until its not capable of being lived in, before they realize how not to treat a planet, etc.

mysecretid
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mysecretid

Cosmic Cleric MaxiMurdok 
Author H.G. Wells famously wrote, “History is a race between education and catastrophe”.
Hopefully, humanity still has enough time left on the clock to get it right.
Cheers,

mysecretid
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mysecretid

GoJammit 
You’re on track. In the classic Star Trek lore, World War III almost wipes out humanity, and that’s what causes the people of Earth to finally get a clue.
This part of the lore is alluded to in the film Star Trek: First Contact (1996). When the Enterprise crew time travels back, to prevent the Borg from changing history, you may remember that Earth is pretty much a post-apoc scenario, and that warp-drive pioneer Zefram Cochrane and the rest are living pretty rough.
Cheers,

GoJammit
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GoJammit

I do some sci-fi writing. And in one of my books I put forward my belief that all planets have to go through near utter destruction. Whether it is nuclear war or som great natural disaster I think a planet has to literally rise from the ashes before they learn to act right. They need to know what it is like to nearly be snuffed out, to have to stare extinction in the face for just a moment, before realizing we are one.
I don’t know ancient Star Trek lore but I think there was some Great War that finally put them on the right track to at the very least I know there was some big war going on when the vulcans showed up.

Cosmic Cleric
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Cosmic Cleric

MaxiMurdok We’re still young and evolving.  If we don’t nuke ourselves out of
existence, we’ll get to a place where a Star Trek universe can exist. 
Either that, or the cockroaches and dolphins will be laughing their
asses off over our corpses.