Here’s an Elder Scrolls newbie vid called Day One in Tamriel

    
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ZeniMax is pumping out plenty of marketing content for Elder Scrolls Online lately, including today’s video entitled Day One in Tamriel. It’s of course aimed at new Xbox One and PlayStation 4 customers, seeing as how day one in Tamriel actually happened way back in March of 2014.

But, whatever, and welcome console newbros! The clip shows you that “there are endless possibilities for how you choose to spend your first day in The Elder Scrolls Online.” View it after the cut!

Source: Day One in Tamriel
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karmamule
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karmamule

Werewolf Finds Dragon First of all, I’m in my 50s, so if you’re older I’m guessing it’s not by much.  :)

Have you played a console version yet?  You do indeed see people crowded around quest givers quite frequently, and you used to on the PC in the early days when the release was still “young”.

And, while I agree the socializing with strangers isn’t particularly there, the console version with its built-in voice chat would be a great way to go in with a few RL friends and have a grand time. And, despite the general silence I’ve struck up a couple fun conversations that could have led to more but my play time was limited at the time.

As far as public dungeons, whenever I have zone chat up (which generally I avoid) I almost always see someone looking for help on a particular dungeon or world boss or dolmen.

On the PC joining a larger guild really changes the feel of the game and it becomes much less “co-op RPG” and much more like a traditional MMO.  

I do agree with you that lots of people are playing the game as you say, but there are plenty of others who are not.  On the PC they’re now (for the most part) “turned inwards” because they belong to their 5 guilds and have plenty of socializing and interaction there, and on the consoles it’s still very much in the fresh early days in which you do see lots of people about.  And, while it’s pretty quiet on the area chat front it nevertheless is pretty easy to strike up a conversation and make a friend if you just speak up.

And, we can both agree on how much we love the game.  Even over a year later I continue to have so much fun, and I haven’t even touched Cyrodiil or Craglorn etc.yet.

Werewolf Finds Dragon
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Werewolf Finds Dragon

That’s what they want you to think, yes. :I The actual experience couldn’t be more detached from that if it wanted to be. I don’t want ESO to flop, I like ESO. I wish that ZeniMax would take a good, long look at their game, then take a good, long look at their marketing, and make the difficult choices they need to about which they actually want.

Werewolf Finds Dragon
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Werewolf Finds Dragon

Since it’s a senche, they may actually be brothers. Heh.

Werewolf Finds Dragon
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Werewolf Finds Dragon

First of all — I’m most likely older than you are, I cut my teeth typing games into a ZX Spectrum from magazine pages, and I absolutely adore ESO. For me, it’s a bit of a revelation, something quite entirely unlike that which has come before it. It’s brilliant, it’s cleverly written and openly designed in a way that respects choice. As an old fart, I haven’t exactly enjoyed many MMOs, I find that most of them are extremely vapid and shallow, relying on addiction tactics rather than anything of actual worth to propel the game forward.
I could count the MMOs I’ve liked on one hand, almost everything else has been a disappointment. ESO keeps pleasantly surprising me with just how much it doesn’t pull its punches and how subtle it can be in the same breath. It’s very much an experience for older folk, for thinkers. It’s best enjoyed in a small group, one that would stop to bother with the lore books strewn around and discuss the world they’re in.
The video isn’t helpful because ESO is about as much an MMO as VVVVVV is a real time strategy game. Now, I suppose you could say that because there can be strategy in VVVVVV and you play it in real time, you could say it’s a real time strategy game, but that’d be somewhat disingenuous. If you tried to present it that way, it’d be a poor illusion at best. This is how ESO is.
It is, at its heart, a co-op/multiplayer RPG. It doesn’t have the parts required to properly be an MMO. They tried, yes, but this team didn’t know how to make one, and what they’ve made instead is an enthralling, engaging co-op experience. You’re not going to be crowding around a quest giver a la WoW, you’re not going to be slowly wandering on mounts toward a dungeon with a large group of people. None of this will ever happen.
Telling people that it would is going to just irritate them, they’ll feel ripped off and lied to. And rightly so! ZeniMax is trying to sell them a game that doesn’t exist. They’ll go in expecting to play WoW on a console, and what they’ll find is a strong co-op RPG experience with tiny MMO bits sprinkled here and there in a half-hearted way. It’s only got MMO gumption just enough for them to actually call it so, but I wouldn’t say it is more than… oh, Guild Wars.
And honestly? Where they’ve tried to force ‘socialising’ it ends up a failure. Like public dungeons. People just try to avoid one another and stay out of each other’s way, as every person or small group there is trying to experience the mystery and wonder if this place for themselves, they’re not going to want others interrupting the delightfully thick atmosphere, the mystique of it all.
ESO isn’t an MMO in the traditional sense. ESO doesn’t want to be. Advertising it as such will just lead to a failure. Yes, it’s fine to advertise it as WoW if it had the features of WoW, but it doesn’t. The end result is just disingenuous, and people will be asking difficult questions about why the actual experience in-game is so entirely opposite of what was advertised.
There are a lot of people out there — on consoles and PC alike — who’d want a co-op RPG experience just like ESO. That’s what they should advertise it as. On that note, they should add ‘party only’ versions of public dungeons, and scale group dungeons to the amount of people present in the group. That’s how ESO will stay alive and healthy. I’m in there, every day, watching what people do, and I’ve not encountered a single person who’s wanted to do a public dungeon with anyone else.
Everyone approaches it like co-op Oblivion, because basically, that’s what it is. So how is it helpful to advertise it as WoW, which is the opposite of that?

Werewolf Finds Dragon
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Werewolf Finds Dragon

I don’t agree with Xomon, but I don’t feel that bombastic replies help, either.

Werewolf Finds Dragon
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Werewolf Finds Dragon

This is why I’m glad of mods. I don’t have to deal with things like that, I can tailor things how I like them. I tend to keep the target frame off outside of combat, and all player names off period.

Werewolf Finds Dragon
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Werewolf Finds Dragon

And they’re still falsely advertising it. Sigh.
First of all? You’ll never see a group around a quest giver like that, that’s WoW. You’re advertising WoW. ESO isn’t built that way. When your marketing team can’t even begin to understand the product they’re selling, something is very, very wrong. I’ve never seen a crowd like that, and I know I won’t, because that’s not how it is. It’s not a linear thing where you go from quest hub to quest hub, gathering up a shopping list. You can try to play it that way, but it’ll fail, and you’ll have a miserable time. Essentially, they’re telling you how to have a bad time, so you’ll be unhappy and leave. How is that good marketing, I ask you?
It’s so heavily story-oriented that you’ll want to have no more than a few quests in your journal at any one time, ideally just doing them as you find them rather than gathering them up. If you don’t do that, it’s easy to lose track of all the interwoven stories, and you’ll lose interest. And that’s a bloody shame, because the writing (especially on the Dominion) is the strongest aspect of ESO.
The next thing they’re doing wrong is implying that the game has large group content, that you’ll be spending a lot of time doing that so hey, look at our social features to help you with that. No. The ‘social features’ were terrible at ESO’s launch because they weren’t necessary. You’ll be doing ninety nine-ish per cent of the content solo, duo, or at most, trio. You’ll be enjoying the story with close friends. You can’t PUG this game because of the stories involved. You need people to play it with on a constant basis, or you’re better going solo. So what they should be advertising is its strengths as a small group game. But no, lookit, giant guilds with lots of people.
They’re terrible at advertising their game. If I didn’t know better, I’d call it corporate espionage, but I know it’s just extroverted ineptitude. This isn’t the first time this has happened. Does anyone remember how ME2 trailers were all mindless violence, awkward ‘sexy’ scenes, and action music? I do. If I hadn’t known what to expect, I’d never have bought into Mass Effect based on the advertising. A game where you spend most of your time talking or plotting strategies on the fly for interesting encounters? Not what the trailers suggested.
I really don’t like this. It’s lying to the wrong people and the right people. And it’s going to bring about ESO’s downfall. They’ve still yet to advertise what ESO does, they only advertise what ESO doesn’t. I keep saying that.
As an ESO player, it’s really irritating to watch.

lokijki
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lokijki

Rustybladez I think that the issue is that it displays your PSN name or gamertag, not your character name.

Hellbound Heart
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Hellbound Heart

Xomon For you bro : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4bijbF3gkNk

and : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NZN1HowUV5Q

Hellbound Heart
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Hellbound Heart

Whinnie the Pooh