WildStar will make crafting less complicated

    
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Carbine has great news for players who feel a little too frazzled and overwhelmed with WildStar’s circuit board crafting system: Making stuff will be less frustrating when this month’s huge free-to-play patch hits.

“Our goal with tradeskills in the free-to-play update was to smartly integrate the new stat changes with the crafting system to keep it deep and rewarding, just not as complicated,” the team explained in a new dev diary today.

Some of the changes coming to crafting include picking what stats you imbue on an item, more choices, easy-to-understand risk management, new crafting talents, simplified tech trees, and a faster process overall. Carbine is also adding in a new master crafting tier for players at the endgame who want to take on bigger and better projects.

Source: WildStar
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RicharddeLeonIII
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RicharddeLeonIII

Considering their boss,ncsoft, a niche level of profitabilty was never going to be enough. Im still afraid the ftp still might not bring enough money in for ncsoft tastes…=(

Feydakin
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Feydakin

Dixa Feydakin I think the playerbase is still there, though certainly reduced. I do think that there are enough “hard core” players to sustain a good MMORPG with a reasonable business model. The problem mainly is that the market is over saturated and I feel like some developers still are afraid to just fill a niche and be satisfied with that. In the case of Wildstar it goes back to the same mentality that made them tout the hard core raiding and subscription model in their marketing, and all the marketing and development money they spent…

Feydakin
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Feydakin

RicharddeLeonIII ColdinT Feydakin It’s all I heard about whenever they talked about their game, and frankly while it tickled my nostalgia nerve, it also turned me way off because they came off as conceited(?). Thinking having those huge raids and a subscription fee made them the second coming of WOW… I know their game already has broad appeal, but they *could* have embraced that harder core raider demographic and settled for a smaller niche. Those players do still exist and in fact there are a lot of them, certainly enough to keep a good game with a  reasonable business model afloat and profitable. Although the market is kind of saturated now, which makes it exponentially harder… it can be done.

Gevah
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Gevah

Dixa small question: what is the MUD you talking about? never played them but i like to read about them

BritoBruno
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BritoBruno

RicharddeLeonIII The game is also great from a F2P standpoint, and seeing all the changes they’re doing, it’ll be a blast to play.

ApathyCurve
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ApathyCurve

spacecampclan 
I always start a new MMO with the intention of only collecting materials and selling them, but I invariably get sucked in by the temptation to make items.  I suppose it appeals to my artistic side, (which I beat regularly and keep in a dark closet with a bowl of tepid water; he babbles the names of obscure colors at night), but I always end up cussing in frustration at the RNG nature of it.
The only two MMO crafting systems I’ve really enjoyed are:

1) Vangaurd.  Much closer to a skill-based system.  It wasn’t just push-and-pray mechanics; you actually had to stay involved and pay attention during the process to get a useful result.
2) Fallen Earth.  This is the only game where I crafted about 90% of my equipment, and it was as good or better than I could loot or buy.

ApathyCurve
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ApathyCurve

schlag sweetleaf 
Looks like the employee interview process for McDonald’s, with approximately the same results.  He’ll be screwing up your drive-thru orders in no time.

RicharddeLeonIII
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RicharddeLeonIII

ColdinT Feydakin You can blame their PR, they pretty much touted the hardcore slant once they got close to open beta.  What that did was scare off the casuals which is almost always the biggest segment of the mmo population.  They didnt even give the game a chance to find out there was more than enough casual content at the start with more coming down the pipeline even tho the endgame was decidedly hardcore.

ColdinT
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ColdinT

Feydakin I know people like claiming that Wildstar was going for this niche of Hardcore…and while that is partially true, they also designed the game with a lot of more casual features as well. There was daily zones to quest in, shiphands, adventures, and an incredibly deep Housing system. Now, maybe some of the stuff was a bit overtuned, and it did take a while for more stuff to come, like the Veteran Shiphands, but it’s not like Wildstar was completely gung-ho hardcore as much as everyone likes to claim.

Dixa
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Dixa

Feydakin  I can’t blame them. Those clamoring for the days of 7 day a week, 40 man raiding were very very vocal even though they were in the minority, and so few of them actually showed up.

Nostalgia is a helluva drug.

The genre, gaming and gamers have moved on from that, and we have have so many more choices game-wise now than we did just 11 years ago. Hell even the MUD that everquest is based on has reduced it’s zoning (what we called raiding) group sizes over the years and even did the unthinkable a few months ago – removed the death penalty!!

11 years ago, workers were paid better for the amount of work they do. Today they are expected to work more, for less, and oftentimes their managers pressure them to free-time or work during their breaks. How is this relevant? Gamers are tired, have less time for huge time-investment advancement paths and don’t have more money to show for it.

I’m 40 now. I logged into my first MUD at age 18. I’m tired. I dearly miss large raids, but I not only do not have the time for that anymore I no longer can physically stay awake 74 hours straight raiding a rare-load zone invasion like I did in my MUD days.

This genre has always had a small playerbase compared to console games, and that player base is aging. The younger generation is gravitating more towards shallow MOBA’s, and FPS games have always dominated. Of course don’t get me started on the influences the Asian market has had on this genre, mostly for the bad.