Shroud of the Avatar’s release 22 ‘feels like a turning point’

    
16

Shroud of the Avatar’s Release 22 is scheduled for tomorrow, and whoa does it boast a lot of stuff. Producer Starr Long has penned a lengthy set of instructions, and he says that the patch “feels like a turning point.”

R22 is important for two main reasons. First, one of the newly added story scenes hearkens back to Ultima and sets players on their starting path based on questions answered. Second, the sandbox experience is expanding thanks to fishing, emote teaching, and musical instruments. Music happens thanks to a variety of instruments that support ABC and MML formats as well as synchronized party play and planned support for in-game file management and song selection.

“This expansion in two axes is exemplary of the kind of game we are trying to make, while at the same time very illustrative of how challenging it is to do so,” Long says.

Source: R22 instructions
Advertisement

No posts to display

newest oldest most liked
Subscribe to:
BigMikeyOcho
Guest
BigMikeyOcho

iridescence Polyanna The new definition of sandbox is equivalent to a ganking simulator. I personally love the addition of all the extra-cirricular stuff, like music and whatnot. I see Shroud as being like a new Lord of the Rings. Logging in more for player events, concerts, shows, etc. than just PvP and loot.

Cujo H
Guest
Cujo H

Can you pick your own starting gear yet?

mindshadow
Guest
mindshadow

PaganRites camelotcrusade There’s a big difference in the following two scenarios:

You’re enter Town T1 and talk to NPC  N1 and he gives you a Quest Q1, which entails going to Towns T2, T3, Dungeon D1, and talk to NPCs N2, N3, N4.

Since you’ve already played the game extensively during Beta, you know exactly where all the Towns, NPCs, and  Dungeons are, and you know the layout so you can just make a bee line straight to the NPCs.  You’ve already seen it.  Sure, you don’t know the story.

A new player would have to explore and find those Towns, Dungeons, NPCs, and experience them for the first time as he embarks on his quest.

Those are two entirely different user experiences.  But hey, to each their own.  Some people don’t care if they’ve memorized every thing and just want to power through the campaign.  Others want to retain some amount of surprise in exploration and discovery.

mindshadow
Guest
mindshadow

camelotcrusade There is that fear.  I’ve played so many betas so I’d tend to agree here that some of that “awe” and “wow” factor can be lost as if you seen it a hundred times already during Beta.

mindshadow
Guest
mindshadow

Polyanna Yes and no.  Fishing, emote teaching, and musical instruments don’t define a sandbox.  But they certainly extend its capabilities as more tools in that sandbox.  If you want to spend your day fishing and ignore the 40-hour story campaign?  By all means do it.  Fish all day and then go back to a Tavern to have some ale to talk about your catch with your friends, who perhaps spent their day decorating their houses or playing music.

The game currently does offer some tools to create their own experiences.  Players are creating sports competitions, hedge mazes, bounty hunting, treasure hunting, their own quests with loot, etc.  And those tools are really bare bones right now but it is by all rights a sandbox (even if in its infancy) given those tools.

https://www.shroudoftheavatar.com/forum/index.php?forums/release-22-event-forum.397/

http://avatarscircle.com/community-events/

http://sotaevents.com/

I don’t see them stopping anytime soon and will be enhancing those tools and giving players even more so they can do whatever they want.  And the online modes are going to be nearly entire player-driven economy, as that’s a well known design goal (they’re not there yet, sure).

dorn2
Guest
dorn2

Have they got UO style taming yet?  That’s really what I care about most.

mindshadow
Guest
mindshadow

Tandor Shadewalker SteveJackn111 Yeah, I’m not a big fan of their overland map thing.  I really wish it was just one big contiguous world.  And they don’t even have an map for the overland in the game.  Which is strange because they have town maps in the game.

mindshadow
Guest
mindshadow

SteveJackn111 Yeah, that’s the general consensus of most players that are playing the “game” fro the first time, especially those that don’t follow the open development closely.  They’re aware of this and the lack of a real tutorial (they have one now but it’s really bare bones and not very good) or guiding intro was intentional as they are still working on the core features.  Content will come later, and this release looks like they added a more story-based intro experience.  It’s still highly unpolished and lacking but it’ll get better over time.  If you’re still lost, watch some Let’s Plays or vids on the game.  Search for The Mad Hermit on YouTube, he seems to have a lot of tutorials.

Tandor Shadewalker
Guest
Tandor Shadewalker

SteveJackn111 I’ve played a number of sessions and invariably they have ended after a few minutes with either my character dying or my being fed up with the constant night darkness.

iridescence
Guest
iridescence

ProfessionalNoob iridescence Polyanna  For me the difference between a sandbox and a themepark is the amount of structure. A themepark pretty much tells you what to do. You may get to go on all the rides eventually but only in the order the dev wants you to. There are “you must be this tall” signs everywhere and really most rides turn out to be the same type but just with different coats of paint.

A sandbox offers more varied types of rides and toys  and allows you to pick the ones you want right away and then maybe switch to playing around with others later. A very extreme sandbox might be like “OK here are some tools, build your own rides” but that is a very niche type of game and not required to make a sandbox I don’t think. Shroud of the Avatar never promised that everything in the game would be created by the players.