The Daily Grind: Do long localization delays make you less likely to play an MMO?

    
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Yeah, it's never happening.

Having written about it recently, I found myself thinking that it might not even matter if Phantasy Star Online 2 even comes out in North America. Seriously, it’s been out for three years now with no sign of localization. If it came out tomorrow, would anyone care any longer? Would people just write it off as yesterday’s jam?

It’s not unique in this department, of course. The same questions were raised when ArcheAge released with no sign of a North American localization for an extended period of time, and people have speculated that the long delay between Blade & Soul‘s native release and its localized release will dampen enthusiasm.

Delays in general can bring a game from The Next Big Thing to A Title You Have Forgotten About. Localization delays can be even worth, because they can mean that the game is out and its flaws are on full display… and you can read about them before you’re having any actual fun in the game. So do long localization delays make you less likely to play games? Or are you excited about the same titles no matter how long they may take to arrive?

Every morning, the Massively Overpowered writers team up with mascot Mo to ask MMORPG players pointed questions about the massively multiplayer online roleplaying genre. Grab a mug of your preferred beverage and take a stab at answering the question posed in today’s Daily Grind!
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squidgod2000
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squidgod2000

Yes, because while you’re waiting on localization, the game itself is being continuously expanded and the developer is responding to the desires of the native playerbase. When the game finally launches in your region, content tends to be released at a highly accelerated clip—to “catch up” to the native game—which can quickly bloat the game and trivialize what was new content and do so at a much faster clip than your usual MMO.

RaulAnthonyGonzalez
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RaulAnthonyGonzalez

Hell fucking yeah! By time the game comes it’s gets cash shop to death and were already playing another mmo. Looking at you ArchAge!

Sorenthaz
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Sorenthaz

DPandaren Sorenthaz Lol, same.   That thing gets updates like every week or two and it’s a pain to keep up with.  Especially when they can sometimes be pretty sizable.

jeremy2020
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jeremy2020

It definitely impacts me. I probably would have played Blade and Soul closer to the original release. The gameplay concepts feel outdated.

DPandaren
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DPandaren

Sorenthaz Yeah, seriously. The only reason why I stopped playing PSO2 was because I didn’t feel like updating the client then updating the patcher to update the english patch. So much work.

AGx
Guest
AGx

I think the scenario you described with Phantasy Star 2 and the typical definition of “Delay” in the games industry. When I think of a delay, that means there was some sort of release date, or at the very least a time frame, that will not be met and is moved to another defined period. With Phantasy Star 2 (and titles like it), there’s no sign what so ever that we (NA) will get it ever. When that’s the case, I write the game off entirely. If the publisher doesn’t care enough about the other regions to say SOMETHING about localization, I don’t care enough to follow your title, especially after it’s been out for a while. If a game is simply delayed, fine. That usually means they are polishing the game and that’s a win-win.

Modrain
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Modrain

Not a problem, my interest in a game is linked to its gameplay, not to its age or graphics, and I’m rather insensitive to hype. I can wait, like I did for Blade and Soul.
But overall, not being a native english already implies that I won’t play localized games most of the time, anyway. If I’m really interested in a game in the first place, and granted there’s no real sign of an ongoing localization work, I’ll play to it in its original version. That’s what I did with Phantasy Star Online 2, and I see it more like an opportunity to learn new languages than a “problem”.

karmamule
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karmamule

It’s not a long localization that keeps me away from most Asian / non-western MMOs, but their tendency towards things like gender-locked classes, limited character customization, and linear questing.  Yes there are some obvious exceptions to this generalization (e.g. Black Desert and it’s fun character customization), but whenever I hear about some new/fun/fantastic MMO coming west I’ll be leery until I get a fuller picture of its feature-set.

The localization WILL potentially turn me off if it’s badly done.  Even when they’re done well in terms of sentence-to-sentence sounding fine, the overall plots don’t come together and sound like a pastiche of unconnected facts with some fantasy names thrown in.  I’m not sure if that’s the fault of the localization or something cultural with the actual story.

starcallerasterei
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starcallerasterei

Depends on if there were fan translations or not. If an english version of PSO2 came out tomorrow, I’d continue playing on the japanese servers with my english patch. Blade and Soul however, Im waiting for it to get localised here (so soon!) although the fact I have played through it in russian and japanese does lower my enthusiasm a bit since it’s not new and exciting to me. The difference there is the story isnt really translated in BnS like it is in PSO2, so I’d still want a proper english release

wjowski
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wjowski

Rozyn Sorenthaz 
‘Lucky’