Industry analysts react to Oculus Rift’s $600 price tag

What was your reaction when you found out that to hop on board the Oculus Rift train, you were going to need to drop $600 on it? That price point really makes one weigh how important virtual reality is to a gamer.

Many games industry analysts are struggling with a proper response to the Rift’s cost as well. Some are saying that it’s a little too pricey (even “overly optimistic”), especially considering the computer specs required to run it, while others say that it might be selling at a loss.

Minority Media CEO Vander Caballero commented, “As a game developer, I wish the Rift had come in at a lower price point to help speed up the adoption of VR and recoup our investment faster. As an avid fan of VR, I understand the frustration about the Rift’s price, but I’m not surprised.”

The general consensus is that while the Oculus Rift and other VR devices won’t flop, the fact that they’re pricey and a new(ish) concept will slow down the penetration into the mainstream. However, some analysts predict that by 2018, prices will be coming down and gamers will be much more accepting of VR on the whole.

“I see VR as a supplement to conventional gaming, not as a substitute, but it will drain some wallet share,” Wedbush Securities Managing Director Michael Pachter said.

Source: Gamasutra
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AGx
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AGx

I’m going to go out on a limb and say that the setup for the majority of PC gamers straddles the line between mid-range and high-end. Going in blind, $600 is a lot to ask for a device that has no perceivable benefit verses some sort of upgrade or even spending that money on 10+ games that does offer you something. I’ve been following Oculus for a while and am very excited for its release but until I can strap one to my head I don’t really have any sort of idea as to whether it’s worth that money for me and right now I also don’t know if there’s anywhere or any way to demo the thing. Why would I be excited about throwing $600 at something like that?

kgptzac
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kgptzac

“Industry react” reads more like “industry does damage control”, due to their $$$ is already banked in VR and count it not to fail to make more $$$

foofad
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foofad

Valhalla Awaits If you think the Vive is going to be cheaper, you’re in for a surprise.

SwobyJ
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SwobyJ

I was thinking more $400-500. Oh well, there will be ways to get it for that within a year or two.

Vagrant Zero
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Vagrant Zero

dragonherderx Vagrant Zero blaaznar skoryy  Sorry for the late response. You are absolutely right. These sensationalist headlines intentionally mix things like FPP or transistor count as raw performance just to get clicks. And people who aren’t as invested on the hardware side get overly excited about these inflated numbers only to be bitterly disappointed in the end.

Fuck them. May they die (the authors of sensationalist pieces, not the disappointed readers). I really do hate the practice.

Veldan
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Veldan

Valhalla Awaits Why, is there a price for the vive known yet? As far as I know there is not, and I’ve seen speculations that the final price will be at least as high as the rift’s.

Voygt
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Voygt

Esoteric Coyote I wish they would change that phrase to be more accurate, “minimum requirements” on Oculus is more like a recommended, its the amount of hardware to produce 90fps to cap out the 90Hz refresh of the display so you do not see frame drops while playing.  If your hardware is close and you still get 60fps it should still be fine.

Valhalla Awaits
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Valhalla Awaits

Meh, just makes the choice between the occulus rift and the vive that much easier. Kinda glad they reduced the choices to just one.

HidingCat
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HidingCat

Wow, I was expecting it to be $400 looking at the DK prices. I guess you can see the margin now. :P

Nyphur
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Nyphur

I just want there to be some reason to actually get one, because so far there is no VR project that is a must-have and isn’t almost as good without VR. EVE: Valkyrie is kind of fun but not $600 fun, and all of the MMOs that can use the Rift play perfectly well without it. I maintain that VR headsets are not primarily gaming devices, and will
end up with the Kinect with more applications in research and other
fields than in gaming.
The only compelling unique applications I’ve seen that actually require VR are psychological or therapeutic in nature rather than games. Irish indie dev Owen Harris has produced an amazing VR demo called Deep that has helped people with anxiety issues, for example. It’s an immersive underwater world that you move through by breathing while wearing this controller which is a strap that fits across your chest. It’s essentially a genius way of using visual feedback to make the user subconsciously perform breathing exercises that are known to relieve anxiety. The user is actively focused on this relaxing VR environment and doesn’t realise they’re being taught to do the breathing exercises.

Then there are the psychological VR projects that use these big 3D cameras to record a scene in 3D and then pipe it into the VR headset like a recorded telepresence session. Your brain is tricked into thinking the scene it’s seeing is real in a way that conventional 2D displays simply can’t convey, which could be huge for things like world news and war reporting in other countries. VR could be used to let you see what life is like in other cultures and could promote racial, culatural and gender sensitivity by putting you in the shoes of another person. Hell, you could mount cameras to a drone and let someone from another country fly it around your country in realtime over the internet, or sell virtual front-row seats at concerts and sports matches.