ESPN officially launches an e-sports division, picks up e-sports journalists

    
48

When Activision-Blizzard acquired Major League Gaming earlier this month, CEO Bobby Kotick revealed his plans to create a kind of “ESPN of e-sports.” It turns out that ESPN has had its own eye on the world of competitive gaming all along, having previously tested the waters with several featured articles, web-streams, and even some live TV coverage. Viewing figures were obviously promising, as today ESPN ramped up its competitive gaming coverage with the launch of a brand new e-sports sub-site.

The new site features general articles on e-sports in addition to dedicated sections for League of Legends, Dota 2, and Hearthstone. The writers involved in the site include ESPN’s own Mina Kimes, who made waves online back in June with an in-depth feature on League of Legends pro Lee “Faker” Sang-hyeok. The site has also picked up notable e-sports journalist Rod Breslau and his colleague Tyler Erzberger from theScore e-sports publication, and articles from Leaguepedia’s Adel Chouadria and Chinese LoL scene expert Emily Rand have also surfaced.

With top e-sports tournaments routinely filling out stadiums, giving millions of dollars in prize money away, and attracting higher viewership than some offline sports, there’s no doubt that competitive gaming is on a sharp upward trend right now. It’s hoped that ESPN’s official adoption of dedicated e-sports coverage will lead to wider acceptance of competitive gaming as sport and more professional reporting standards.

newest oldest most liked
Subscribe to:
PaulFortunato
Guest
PaulFortunato

Midgetsnowman
Man, it makes total sense that e-sports players would exploit adderall.

GoJammit
Guest
GoJammit

Karl_Hungus Midgetsnowman ManastuUtakata The amazing thing is that there was a time in your life at all that you ever thought it was real to begin with. I don’t think anyone watches it under the impression that it’s real. They go there to cheer on their favorite actor and watch him do his supermove like kids watched the five lions assemble Voltron. You know it’s coming. They even repeat the lines with them. I don’t know why sexuality has to  be brought into it.

GoJammit
Guest
GoJammit

Arrobee And I’ll add to that, Rumm I can promise you there are plenty of pros who would have their asses handed to them by some dudes at the local basketball court, or some cubans fresh off the boat. The fact that a pro is not infallible means nothing.

GoJammit
Guest
GoJammit

PurpleCopper There’s nothing for you to be skeptical about. Chess is already recognized as a sport by the Olympics. I find myself continually amused by how people trip over their lips to proclaim how video games are not a sport everytime this comes up. Calling it a sport simply means there is a competition involved. It doesn’t take away the physical effort involved in running around a field. With so many varied sports there are from skiing to baseball, it’s just ludicrous that people have such a bug up their butts about legitimate competition being televised and called sport.

plakia
Guest
plakia

All I see on the site is ASSFAGGOTS and Hearthstone. Where are the real competitive games? Some RTS, arena shooters, or even CS is what they should be covering. Not the over-marketed trash that is already in decline because they require little skill and a lot of memorization.

Madda
Guest
Madda

Armsbend Madda It’s definately one of Madda’s dreams to be a caster at an e-sports thing, but very demanding of your voice. Madda has trouble speaking clearly (darn Marylander accent) at times. Maybe Madda should try…

Arrobee
Guest
Arrobee

All these sport-purists kicking and screaming. Whether you want to acknowledge or accept esports as sports is irrelevant. It is happening before our eyes, nothing you say will stop it.
Now to address a comment from @rumm, about how kids can be pros in a month, and how real athletes train their whole lives (except for those golf outliers, I think that’s a fallacy? I’m not sure.) And how sports are expensive therefore sports.
I searched golf clubs, as I’m sure most can agree that it is a rich man’s sport. A set of clubs can cost from $800 to over $3000. Depending on how much overcompensation you want to commit to.
A gaming rig, can easily cost just as much, again, depending on your desired level of compensation.
“But their mom pays for it.” I hear you exclaiming angrily into your keyboard. And I’m sure a fledgling golfer had his/her first golf set gifted to them for their 12th birthday as well.
The only difference in amount to entry, is as a golfer, you also need to pay obscene amounts of money to play at the courses. Whoo rich people problems.
The whole “pro in a month” thing is ridiculous. Sure they could be pro at a game in a month, because you don’t even have to be good to be a pro, you just have to be paid. That’s what pro means. When you are paid for a skill/talent you migrate from hobbiest to professional.
The whole athletes train their whole lives but a 15 year old just picked up the controller, is also silly.
Do you remember the first time you played a videogame? Where you good at it? Did you have to practice? What about basketball? Football? No one picks up a controller for the first time when they are 15 and can be an elite gamer that plays in compitetions for money.
They have been honing their craft in most cases since the time they learned how to turn on a TV. It’s no different from dribbling a ball since they could walk. They have spent their lives gaming, sharpening their focus, coordination, muscle memory and reaction speed.
Who are you, a spectator, to call what they do anything less than a sport, especially when it meets all your criteria for sports?

Karl_Hungus
Guest
Karl_Hungus

Midgetsnowman Karl_Hungus ManastuUtakata 
Well, yeah. Gravity again. Look, I’m a lifelong wrasslin’ fan. When I was a kid, I saw Sting beat Ric Flair for the NWA world title live in an arena packed with people in my home town. My face was painted like Sting’s. I had the hair cut too, wearing a Sting t-shirt, and white-knuckle clenching his action figure, my most prized possession in the world. I marked out so hard when he won that I cried tears of joy as it happened. But I eventually grew up and learned that, like virtually everything else on TV, it’s fake, scripted, and staged. 
I’ve even trained in a wrasslin’ school. The only thing that’s real is gravity, the canvas ring mat, and the steel cables wrapped in tape that they call the ropes. So yeah my first time in the ring left me sore with some rug burns. But the actual wrasslin’? It’s all choreographed. Every single move requires both people to execute it. It’s nothing more than glorified ballet for men not comfortable with their sexuality. They’re still watching other men in tights touch each other, but because they’re pretending to fight, it’s ok lol

Midgetsnowman
Guest
Midgetsnowman

Holy shit. and now ESPN’s main tv channel is running an Outside the Lines on Esports and adderall doping. Theyre serious about this push.

Armsbend
Guest
Armsbend

Madda it takes a lot of practice to cast anything – esports or real sports.  Ive read bios on a lot of them they practice at small levels and some even just cast over a match to themselves.  Like practicing in front of a mirror.  

If it interests you try it out.  Gotta start somewhere.