Dungeons and Dragons struggles with lag after data center move

    
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Still crazy after all these years.
If you’re one of the Dungeons and Dragons Online players struggling with extreme lag (or concerned over rumors of duping) in the wake of last week’s data center move, Turbine has a few tech suggestions for you.

“Some of this may be increased latency as DNS reroutes around the [physical] move, but also you’re going to want to update port forwarding (or might need to set it up if you haven’t previously and are having issues connecting) since there’s an expanded swath of ports the game client’s using (previously 9000-9010 to 9000-9058 post move) and some router/modem models might need to have them configured,” says CS rep Mirthgar. “Beyond that make sure you are also putting in Tech Support requests too so we can gather some info from you and try some troubleshooting while looking into this.”

Community Manager Cordovan has welcomed traceroutes as well.

And it’s not over yet. Turbine’s said its website is due to move this week:

“We are in the process of preparing to move DDO.com to our new data center. What this means for you is that sometime around 9:00 AM Eastern (-5 GMT) on Tuesday, March 15th we will temporarily close the forums to posting, so that we can copy the data over to the new data center, do some checks on it, and then reopen the forums to posting. It’s possible the web site may be unavailable for a while as this work is being done.

When the web site is reopened, you should simply see the ability to post in the forums, and that’s that. However, some Internet Service Providers may take some time for the new DNS information to propagate, so if you run into an issue, you can clear your browser cache, or, if you are technically savvy enough to want to do it, open up a command prompt on your computer and type ipconfig /dnsflush.”

ddo-lag

Source: Official site, CS. With thanks to TJ!
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Loopstah
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Loopstah

donweel Loopstah Again, this is not the 90s anymore where you have to set up your IPX protocol or set up a virtual LAN via dial-up in order for the game to work. I exclusively game on PC my entire life and play a vast variety of games (from mainstream developers as well as some indy), and 99.9% of games i play require 0 interaction from me in terms of setting up the hardware in order to play. The only games that do are some poorly configured ports or emulators.
This might be a purely subjective experience, but i would definitely skip out on any game that requires me to make exceptions in my fairly liberal firewall policy.

RemRemi
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RemRemi

‘Rumors of duping’?  That’s rich.  It wasn’t rumors, it was a step by step guide telling how to duplicate LGS augments including the immortal heart cleansor.  http://www.ddovault.com/cgi-bin/yabb2/YaBB.pl?num=1456624792 :)

donweel
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donweel

I was having trouble in a few explore areas like Orchard, and some of the quests in Harbinger of Madness. I did set up port triggering in my router. This involved editing the port in my DDO settings file, and simply putting that port as the trigger then using 9000-9058 as the open ports. The game is running quite normally now even from Vancouver BC. My trace route shows 60-70 hops. Lag is not across the board since the data centre move. Some people have better performance, some worse. A lot of the complaints centre around raiding, I can’t speak to that.

donweel
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donweel

Loopstah Because this is not across the board it entirely depends on which router you use and your isp. This has always been a fact of life for pc gamers. I have done port forwarding port triggering for different games for years. It is one of the tolls for gaming on a pc, like juggling ram or the latest video card you need. If you want simplicity get a console.

Loopstah
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Loopstah

I hate sounding like an entitled brat, but why should the players have to do any sort of port forwarding or network configuration on their end in order for the game to work properly. 
Unless somebody is running a super tight ship for whatever paranoid reason (you’re not gonna get hacked through open ports), the game should work out of the box as-is without any extra effort. 
Turbine – you caused this problem during the migration – the ball is in your court.

MrEllis
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MrEllis

Karl_Hungus

MrEllis
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MrEllis

Did they try unplugging it and plugging it back in?

Kaloth
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Kaloth

Addendum:
If you’re getting a good ping to the game’s servers, but still have latency, it’s again going to be one of two things: The game servers are overloaded, or your system’s not up to spec to run the game. If anyone remembers the early days of WoW and the horrible, horrible lag that existed (and copious server crashes), that’s an example, albeit extreme, of game servers being overloaded. The servers just could not process all the commands that were coming in from players and so everything slowed down while the server tried to work its way through the ever-expanding list of commands.

Kaloth
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Kaloth

I’m so tired of seeing these BS measures for reducing ping/latency suggested by community managers. It seem to be the go-to “it sounds technical so it must work” method, whilst actually having no real effect.
“Your ports aren’t configured correctly”. If they’re blocked, then they’re blocked. Latency isn’t going to be a thing because you’re not connecting in the first place. In a number of cases so small as to be statistically zero, this may actually do something. They don’t need to be forwarded if you can connect, because the path has already been established through your network.

Traceroutes. It’s probably not going to get anything fixed for you. In most cases of latency the cause is outside of the game’s own network; it’s your ISP that’s using a rubbish route to get to the game servers. If there’s latency on the game’s network, they probably know about it already and don’t need your tracert. That said, tracert can, in rare cases, be useful for the game’s devs to see where their players are being routed from, so if a large number of them are coming through a poor link somewhere, they can harass their provider to try and get their players routed through a more favourable route. Don’t expect anything to be done if you’re an int’l player, though.
Clearing your browser cache will update your ISPs DNS records. I don’t even. That’s what it reads like. It’s just so wrong I don’t know where to start. Also, unless something has changed recently, clearing browser cache doesn’t clear your local dns cache (from what I recall), and as such wont do jack. Doing ipconfig /flushdns will only work if your dns server has already updated their records. If you’re savvy enough to do that, you’re probably also savvy enough to be using google dns or opendns, and your records will be updated quickly anyway.
What latency boils down to is, in almost all cases, one of two things: Your ISPs route to the game servers, or the game’s own servers/network. You can actually fix the first one of these things, but the other is just something you grin and bear or pick a different game to play. 
If it’s your ISPs network that is poorly routed, you can use a latency-lowering service (I’m not naming any as I’m not interested in promoting particular businesses). What this does is, essentially, make your traffic run at a higher priority and run through a different route that has been optimised by the service. I’ve yet to see a free one (that actually works), so be prepared to pay for it. Also, sometimes these services will make a huge difference, but sometimes it’ll be next to nothing, so try them out before putting any money down.

MesaSage
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MesaSage

I’m shocked, shocked I tell you.