The Daily Grind: What motivates you to try out an MMORPG?

    
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The Daily Grind: What motivates you to try out an MMORPG?

I’ve seen many designers and players over the years say that a game going free-to-play will attract more players, but I’ve always wondered about that. The logic seems clear enough, of course; removing the price tag from Tree of Savior means that more people can jump in without feeling like they’ve made big investments first. But most of the people I know seem to be motivated to play a game by the game itself and what it promises, not by the presence or lack of a pricetag. Black Desert managed to win quite a few people over just by virtue of its systems, and that still costs money.

But are mechanics really what makes it happen? Some people try out games based on the company publishing those games, some try out games based upon the current buzz from an update, and some try out games based entirely on whether or not the designers like the right football team. So what about you, dear readers? What motivates you to try out an MMORPG? And for extra credit, what do you see offered as an enticement that actually makes you less interested in the game?

Every morning, the Massively Overpowered writers team up with mascot Mo to ask MMORPG players pointed questions about the massively multiplayer online roleplaying genre. Grab a mug of your preferred beverage and take a stab at answering the question posed in today’s Daily Grind!

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AGx
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AGx

As bad as it may sound, the visuals (i.e. graphics) is what gets me to try out a new MMO. Now before you jump down my throat about that, hear me out:

Generally speaking, graphics are not the most important thing to me when it comes to video games. However, when I look at the whole genre, there are a number of games that impress me with their combat systems (e.g. B&S, BDO, Tera) or story (SWTOR, ESO, FFXI, FFXIV) or maybe they just LOOK fun (too many to list). So when it boils down and I need to decide on which one to try, it’s going to be the one that’s the prettiest. I’ll still judge the game on how it actually plays, what I can do, and how fun it actually is but on the outside looking in, it’s the visuals that sway me one way or another.

Visuals aside, it’s usually something like lack of fast travel (as I never liked that honestly), how large the map is, how much there is to do outside of combat, and whether or not it has PvP (which is mandatory for me).

ZenDadaist
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ZenDadaist

A patch of boredom in which I’m not motivated by my current games, or the people I want to do things with aren’t around for a while. Or I just want to get away from all the usual stuff for a while and poke something new perhaps with new people or perhaps just solo for now. Then I’ll review games I’m aware of and whether there’s anything about thmem that makes me want to give one a look. So, generic fantasy can nope right out of there, as can games I’ve heard are lockbox-filled with intrusive cash shops. As an example, right now I have zero interest in looking at stuff like Shroud of the Avatar, Chronicles of Elyria, Landmark, anything from PWE etc.

Then I’ll investigate what another game might offer and look for some
kind of try before you buy feature (free time code, F2P game, free trial
etc). The game has to have something that will appeal to me though. For something I consider to be a time and money investment – i.e. an MMO and not a quick £5 Steam game I’ll play a few evenings tops – I won’t want to commit money and emotional investment into characters upfront until I’ve had the chance to see if the game will be for me.

Once I’ve found something that sounds interesting and that I can poke my nose in without financial risk, it’ll come down to how quick and easy it is to get making a character and then on to playing. So, the account setup and game download and configuring steps. If it’s an arcane and well-hidden process that requires a ton of hopping back and forth between email and account pages and authenticators and ID checks and signing your firstborn before you can even begin a client download – and then the download is going to take 5hrs+ even on my fast fibre connection… meh. I’ll be put right off.

If a game has got past all of that, then I’ll give it a good go :)

ReginaldAtkins
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ReginaldAtkins

it starts with visuals… some games look interesting so I tend to research the play mechanics.

Polyanna
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Polyanna

I’ve played a fair number of MMOs and other types of games, and at this point I buy or try mainly based on who made it (studio and publisher). I’ll try anything once that some companies make, and I won’t give it a second thought if it’s made by certain others.

I used to try things based on IP, setting, or features. But I got tired of seeing games I initially liked very much ruined by stupid decisions and lack of investment. MMOs are different from most games in that they invite you to invest a lot of time, over many years. And I don’t like putting that into a game where I know that the company in charge eventually will find some way to fuck it all up.

Kalamari
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Kalamari

hype.

Cyroselle
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Cyroselle

Art style, open world, player agency, crafting, animation, sound design and classes – pretty much in that order.
▪It has to be pretty enough that I can look at it without cringing every time.
▪I need to be able to explore.
▪I need to have the tools and freedom to play my own way.
▪I want to be able to make gear/weapons/pretty things for myself and others. Not direct NPCs to craft for me, *I* want to do it! And I want the crafting to be deep and meaningful.
▪Animation should be fluid and believable. Running shouldn’t look like a guy stepping through tires at bootcamp. And on the combat side a greatsword should look like it’s heavy, not like it’s as easy to swing as a feather duster.
▪Sound design should be punch and aid the combat in feeling meaty, but know when to pull back so that awe can settle in naturally.
▪Classes (if they exist at all, they really don’t need to) should feel more like a role and less like a cage.

Coffee, Please
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Coffee, Please

“But are mechanics really what makes it happen?”
Yep. That’s the #1 reason why check ’em, followed by story, setting, artwork. Not necessarily in that order.
The company behind it matters if the company has a bad reputation. Obviously. No matter the mechanics or anything else there are some companies that I’ve learned simply are not worth the time. That’s not going to change because they’re not going to change.

schmidtcapela
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schmidtcapela

deekay_zero schmidtcapela Estranged 
Yep, I know. The “decks” of old were basically a bunch of random common and uncommon cards plus lands; the ones sold currently are pre-built to have a synergy and a strategy, even if they are still weak.

Nevertheless, progressing beyond that very basic level means either purchasing boosters that come with random cards, or else purchasing specific cards from dealers. And, for something meant to be done for enjoyment, I can accept neither; I’m roughly the opposite of a gambler, I get none of  the thrill that gamblers get when something positive comes their way, only frustration when lady luck doesn’t smile my way.

ComradeStanimir
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ComradeStanimir

Art, character customization, PvP, story, in that order.

deekay_zero
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deekay_zero

schmidtcapela deekay_zero Estranged if you sell magic today then you know full well most of the products are mostly fully formed decks that are ready to play out of the box.

that’s what i was saying it’s not like the 90s anymore where you spend $200 for a weak deck.

i’m not saying it’s not pay2win anymore (it is) but it’s not as bullshit as in our youth.