Chinese government attacks on Honour of Kings MOBA leads to child locks

    
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You may not have heard of Honour of Kings, but that’s probably because you don’t live in China. It’s one of the most popular mobile MOBAs in the country, racking up an astounding 200 million players (50M of whom are monthly active users) since its launch in 2015. And it’s that popularity that has the government worried, with a state-owned newspaper calling the game a “drug” and “poison.”

In particular, the Chinese government is concerned that kids might be getting addicted to Tencent’s MOBA, hinting that regulations on the title should be imposed. Perhaps to get out in front of government interference, Tencent went ahead and slapped the game with a child lock. Now, kids under the age of 12 can play only an hour a day, and youth ages 12 through 18 are limited to two hours daily.

Tencent’s stock took a sizable hit from the government’s statements, falling 4% initially. The company also runs League of Legends in China and made $3.9 billion from gaming in Q1 2017. Honour of Kings will be coming to the west in September of this year.

Source: BBC, SCMP. Thanks CistaCista and Mysecretid!
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Jack Pipsam

Sounds horrific those kind of locks.

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mcsleaz

Do chinese smartphones have some kind of DNA Analysis tool built in to verify the age? Or are they relying on these children to be honest?

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Armsbend

I wouldn’t doubt for a second that chinese phones are linked to a SS# of sorts as an identifier They have been very successful in strangling data on the internet – should be an easy task for them.

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Jack Pipsam

Why be honest when you have idiots trying to censor you? Kids have to lie online to use it as there’s no other way.

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Melissa McDonald

Also why they crack down on religion. The State can brook no rival. You’re either a good little robot, or in need of “re-education”.

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Armsbend

I wish the Chinese government would release data on how these types of measures work (or don’t work) so the international community could take an honest look at themselves.

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bobfish

There are laws in South Korea that limit game time per day for children, and have been for several years now. There might be data available from there instead.

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Armsbend

Thanks I will try to find some data.

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Jack Pipsam

Yeah because government’s forcing aspects of your life is something more countries should take influence from?

If these sort of things locked adults out you’d be outraged.

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TheDonDude

Only in the gaming world could a sentence like this article’s title exist.

camren_rooke
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camren_rooke

I had a real hard time parsing that title as well.

Took a few tries.

English.

Such a silly language.

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Melissa McDonald

On the other hand, the vast amount of words and the verbose nature of English makes it really good for poetry and expressing shades of emotion and levels of angst.

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Vardalaka

I’m looking forward to this game. Thanks a lot for citing the release date in the West, I had been trying to find it for a couple of days.

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bobfish

Have a search for Strike of Kings, its been released under that name in a few western countries already.

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Vardalaka

Right. I’ve already visited their site but found nothing about the release in North America. Thanks for the help.

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MesaSage

I don’t even know where to begin with this one, so I’ll just leave it alone.

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Tamanous

It’s no different than any other addiction problem. Some countries just handle it differently than others.

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mcsleaz

That tone your using sounds like you think it’s a good idea to let children waste away for countless hours in front of video games and not do anything else. I think child locks on games should be standard industry practice, worldwide. Nothing wrong with tearing your face away from technology and getting out into the Real World for a few hours a day, Of course this is a concept that the Facebook Generation could never comprehend.

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Jack Pipsam

I disagree, it’s the parents job to parent, not the government.
As someone who did play many hours of games as a kid along with going outside, I find the idea insulting that only you can decide that’s best for me. It’s sheer arrogance.

Every kid like every person is different in different circumstances. It might not be as easy to stride outside for everybody for whatever reason.

Besides, let’s us not forget that kids now have less room than ever to actually go outside, there’s so much fear about being kidnapped or whatever that they don’t have the freedom you might have had to play outside. So it’s a double punch in the gut.