Austin company announces brand-new BrightLocker gaming platform

    
17

If you’re fed up with the messes that are Steam and Android and the Apple Store, BrightLocker might be for you. Announced just this morning, the portal is being billed as

“the only platform for game discovery, community interaction and funding that bridges the connection between game developers and players in ways not seen before in the industry. Supporting all types of game developers, from early concept to post launch, as well as all platforms including PC, console, mobile and VR, BrightLocker launches with a line-up of both new and established games designed for every type of player.”

The first games to launch on the Austin-based platform include a few MMOs and other games we cover — Life is Feudal, Descent Underground, and Fractured Space. The company lists World of Warcraft, FIFA, Star Wars: The Old Republic, and the Sony PlayStation Network as its team members’ credentials.

Source: Press release, official site
newest oldest most liked
Subscribe to:
Reader
David Goodman

I’m looking over the site because I was interested — it seems less like Steam, and more like Kickstarter For Games Only. Is there a ‘store’ / purchase portal to buy/download games to play?

All i’m seeing — that is obvious and in front of me, an uneducated boob — are pages about the progress of games in development, and options to sign up. (maybe if I sign up I can see more, but i’m not signing up to anything at this point, and your site purpose – the entire purpose – should be clear and distinct without any barriers)

Reader
Loyal Patron
Patreon Donor
Armsbend

“and funding”

My curiosity stopped right there.

Reader
Dug From The Earth

Ill take my new platform release info without a side of bias please.

Godnaz
Reader
Godnaz

Steam is a great piece of software with many structure and policing issues. More stringent requirements for games in development, better vetting for player reviews like 10-20hrs minimum before one can be given. More robust storefronts for developers so they can list ingame packages and items in more detail. The big publishers need to give up on their attempts to compete with Steam IMO. EA’s Origin, Blizzard’s BattleNet, Ubisoft’s Uplay, all worthless control of software distribution and monetization. TBH, I’d probably still play those publishers games if they had gone with Steam.
Steam is going to receive a massive overhaul and it should address many of its short comings.

Reader
Peter Couse

Thanks for answering the question I had about peoples issues with Steam. Most of the issues seem to be related to people who are deep into Steam and gaming. For a part-time player like myself Steam seems to work fine. I ignore Steam reviews, I don’t by early access much (just don’t have the time or funds to play partial games) and storefronts…meh, seems like something between Steam and developers.

The only thing that matters to me which I like about Steam is the (sorta) automatic updates. I’m sure other places do it too but it is nice to know that, more than likely, when you sit down to play you don’t have to wait half an hour for patch 3.098KWX78.

Anyway, as usual with any new venture, hope they succeed.

Reader
Sray

Couldn’t disagree more: without competition Valve has zero reason to improve any shortcomings. Other efforts like Origin need to expand their scope, and offer both exclusives and that which Valve flat out refuses to do: enforce professional behavior from game devs, and put actual human eyes on products before selling them. If that means they have to even slightly close the floodgate to the deluge of games, then so be it: let the asset flippers and card exploiters peddle their shovelware elsewhere.

Reader
John Kiser

Except you know those games get down voted as they should. They exist in any medium and will st ill exist with or without steam being there. It is not valve’s nor any other game company (short of first party titles) to police what is put on their platform beyond a certain point. Those “asset flippers” a lot of the time are using pre-established marketplace packs for their game engine and the like (be it RPG maker (which btw I was involved heavily with and some of what I did would be called asset flipping and yet a lot of the games I did work on are looked favorably on though that was back in the rpg maker/rpgmaker 2k/rpgmaker 2k3 days))

The current policing works well enough and if there are enough complaints about a game Valve reacts. The people that seem to have a large problem with steam are people that seem to have a stick up their ass and expect some sort of unrealistic scenario where valve just polices everything which is wholly unrealistic for ANYTHING particularly a game platform that is primarily for selling through. They react to user complaints about a game. This new platform isn’t going to solve any sort of dilemma with that shit unless they have an unrealistically high employee count number which will cause them to burn out capital like nobodies business.

Reader
Sray

No company polices its store? False. Everything you see in your local grocery store or bestbuy has had human eyes on it before it was put on the shelves. That doesn’t mean that every product is flawless, or even food, it means that some has looked at it and said “this isn’t poison and/or a scam”. The customer doesn’t have to police the storefront for them.

It actually doesn’t take a lot of effort, but it does mean you can’t have the floodgates open to everyone with 100 dollars; you probably have to limit the number of new games per month, and also have new devs to put up a refundable deposit on examining first time submissions. There is a middle ground between the locked down environment of the consoles and the complete lawlessness of present day Steam.

Reader
John Kiser

I said no game selling platform can be expected to police their store to the extent that people like you expect them to. The ones that “do” only tend to sell larger profile games.

Reader
Sray

Yet Microsoft, Sony and Nintendo all police their storefronts to far greater extent than what “people like me” want from Valve, while still allowing dozens -but not hundreds- of new indies titles on their stores every month. There is a middle ground, and in fact Valve used to occupy that middle ground about 5 or 6 years ago, then they opened the flood gates and let pretty much anyone with 100 dollars through the door. It is not an unreasonable expectation of the consumer to be assured of bare minimum quality control.

Reader
John Kiser

They also have much smaller stores. Sony also requires that you meet stringent guidelines to even get on the platform to the point that getting some games on the platform at all would literally be impossible. And the 100 dollar thing is more recent to replace the greenlight situation. Look I get you have some chip on your shoulder about valve/steam but you can opt to IGNORE shit you know? If you went to a largely indie platform you’d probably just piss and moan about the ability for people to add to it. You don’t like the rpg maker games unless they are wholly original or potential scammers (which valve removes promptly if shit is pointed out and the like) microsoft’s store doesn’t have indie titles at all for the most part short of mobile game ports and a few big budget games, same with sony and nintendo. It is extremely hard to get indies through on consoles vs a PC (microsoft was notorious for this to the point that even patching a game was problematic)

There are caveats and the like and with being more open yes valve does welcome in some questionable games, but some gems get through that wouldn’t otherwise be able to reach that same audience potentially.

Reader
MesaSage

I think we also need another dotcom that sells meal kits.

Reader
Sray

A store for early access games that seems to at least have a minimum amount of curation over what gets put up? Could be good.

However, they’re going to need a lot of exclusives -and soon- if they’re going to simply survive, let alone thrive. If they’re just weeding out the worst shit of what’s on Steam, then why would a person use them for anything other than just a confirmation that a game is not just shovelware, and then just buy from Steam where all the rest of their games are?

Reader
Kickstarter Donor
Loyal Patron
Tobasco da Gama

A store for early access games that seems to at least have a minimum amount of curation over what gets put up? Could be good.

Yeah, that’s pretty interesting. The devil will be in the details of the curation and moderation, but the concept certainly has my attention.

semugh
Reader
semugh

and what about GOG, itch, gamejolt, etc, etc, etc, …

(but I like steam best ofc being not windoze only)

Reader
Loyal Patron
Patreon Donor
Kickstarter Donor
Paragon Lost

Don’t care for any of the middleman software. I prefer to get software from the source.

Reader
Francis Baud

Looks like a pretty cool platform. I like the layout on the main page, where you can clearly see the progress of the development for every game. Will be keeping an eye on that one.