Global Chat: To RIFT or not to RIFT?

Everyone’s talking about RIFT’s new Prime server idea — and whether or not it will get us playing Trion Worlds’ fantasy MMO once again. Naturally, the blogosphere had a few thoughts about this.

Stargrace said that it was “highly unlikely” that she’d return for this: “While I am drawn into progression servers for EverQuest and EverQuest II due to a heavy nostalgia factor, I don’t get those same warm fuzzy feelings about RIFT.”

“If anything induces me to give RIFT Prime a try it will be the extent to which the experience doesn’t accurately replicate the original,” Bhagpuss said. And Endgame Variable takes a look at it from the perspective of a former player: “Do I want to pay a subscription to play old content in RIFT — a game I’ve already played to death — or pay a subscription to play new content in FFXIV or WoW?”

Digital Initiative: The types of guildies you’ll lead

“This person falls into two distinct categories: the person who knows things when asked and the person who will explain everything at all times regardless of context. The big difference is being able to tell when people need or want things explained, and when they don’t.”

Me vs. Myself and I: EverQuest II housing

“I feel like having an actual house is a nice touch, and seeing all of the cool items that I worked hard to get throughout the years is satisfying. I truly thing EQ2 has probably the best housing system out of any other MMO I’ve played. The newer houses feel more like the housing in RIFT, where it’s more of a zone and not just a house.”

The Daily Frostwolf: Why am I playing this game after all these years?

“Yes, the game is old. This game is older than my kids. It’s going to be 14 years this year! And yet, I am still here playing. How is it that I am not bored of it yet? This is the longest I have ever played a game — though Words With Friends, is that counted as a game? I like playing that a lot too — and yet I will still be playing WoW for another 14 years, easily!”

Contains Moderate Peril: Alternate ways to reach LOTRO’s level cap

“Because LOTRO has been streamlined and updated over the years to accommodate the various increases to the level cap, it is quite easy in the early stages of the game to pursue multiple levelling paths. New players will often find that they out level a zone long before they finish all the content it offers. Hence there are options when it comes to progressing.”

The Ancient Gaming Noob: A glimpse of anarchy

“That splash screen belies what came next. Rather than a glorious future on a modern new planet I was transported back nearly 20 years in time when polygon counts were low, UI design consisted of throwing windows about at random, and 1024×768 was deemed a large enough screen resolution for anybody’s needs.”

Ardwulf’s Lair: Elder Scrolls Online second impressions

“In terms of feel, in addition to the Elder Scrolls vibe that it tries (not entirely successfully) to embody, ESO also gives me hints of EQ2, Age of Conan, and (perhaps most importantly for me) Vanguard. I am finding this odd melange to be more effective the more I play, despite the variances from single-player Elder Scrolls games and more conventional MMORPGs reading as off-putting at first.”

Tales of the Aggronaut: World scaling thoughts

“So do I mourn the old fast and silly leveling with heirlooms? Admittedly a little bit. Because it was fun to feel that powerful and get through the content that quickly. However I also realize it was a bit much and lead to all sorts of problems like being unable to kill something slow enough to complete any of those ‘use item while weakened’ type quests.”

GamingSF: Longer quests

“Two games that I’ve played recently do not strictly follow this more modern take on ‘questing,’ however: Dungeons & Dragons Online and Elder Scrolls Online. There are positives to a ‘quest’ actually having some length and substance — it’s less confusing to be focused on one task rather than the usual juggling of half-a-dozen more or less overlapping bite-sized ones. Also the story-telling can be a lot more rich and immersive in a quest that lasts longer.”

MMOBro: Subscriptions are still the worst business model

“Subscriptions failed as a model, and they failed because people realized there are better options. For all the flaws of other business models — and oh boy, they do have them — none are quite so bad a deal for the player as a monthly subscription fee. I firmly believe it is the worst business model for an MMORPG.”

Every day there are tons of terrific, insightful, and unusual articles posted across the MMO gaming blogosphere — and every day, Justin reads as many as he can. Global Chat is a sampling of noteworthy essays, rants, and guides from the past few weeks of MMO discourse.
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Robert Mann

Rift wasn’t that bad of a game… if they had ever figured out how to really boil down to the original ideas.

What was left, after they were done trying to appease everyone under the sun, was a messy and poorly done thing for the most part. The issues that would have been could have been excused away, but with the changes there was just minimal room for that left.

They did have some interesting things even then. It just wasn’t enough to push past a rather buggy and poorly written (even for MMOs) re-performance of everything I despised that was going on with WoW other than community relations… which I actually give points to Trion above Blizzard on, and that’s just because Blizz does a tragic job of being toxic to their players.

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Knox Harrington

I don’t know. Out of sheer principle, I really want to support a subscription-only MMO service that is not WoW or FFXIV, but the fact that it’s Trion makes me hesitant because of their track record. I’m going to stay on the fence for now.

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Skhull

Screw rift, and screw trion.

hurbster
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hurbster

Sigh, remember when Rift was the fresh alternative to WoW ? All the malarkey over the ‘This isn’t Azeroth’ ads ? Can we have that game back ?

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Knox Harrington

For better or worse, it still isn’t Azeroth lol… but yeah I agree with what you’re saying. The promise Rift once held has not endured.

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Sorenthaz

Not to mention Trion had a top quality customer service, CM community events, and special stuff like scavenger hunts that awarded titles.

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Robert Mann

Na, because too many people pushed the “We want WoW, just not WoW” at them, and they caved.

Antiseptic
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Antiseptic

RIFT Prime Server… see’s Trion Worlds associated with it. Answer to the question: HELL NO!

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Bryan Turner

Look if you actually have the opportunity to participate that’s better than some people who slip through the very wide cracks of their Soviet Server farms over in Trino’s Easter Block Lair; that’s just what I envision when I try to imagine what archaic hardware they must be running on to prevent me from logging in (because if your connection isn’t wired broadban it must be voodoo right); so if you actually have the opportunity some of us don’t get to have then by all means sign up for the Prime Server so that people like me (that are still interested in this game and want to play it but are incapable of logging in can enjoy it like a voyeur through a window I guess).

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Crowe

Heh, I knew you’d be here to complain about your connection issues. Just like all of the other Rift articles.

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Bryan Turner

That’s a rather simple way of looking at that comment, I was merely suggesting that he participate in this server and stream it so that people like me can experience it vicariously; if I happen to still be angry about that whole situation it is clearly secondary to the actual subject of the comment.

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Hydlide S

Can’t wait to play with the 25 people that actually sign up.

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rafael12104

Not to Rift. There is no question.

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Cosmic Cleric

MMOBro: Subscriptions are still the worst business model

“Subscriptions failed as a model, and they failed because people realized there are better options.

1) It can’t “failed” if it’s still being used.

2) “People” don’t all agree that there are better options.

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CMDR ShrunkenQuasar

I’m no fan of subscriptions, but even I have to admit they haven’t failed as a model. Off the top of my head, at least three of the most popular MMOs of today have been subscription based their entire lives, with no plans on changing that model. As much as I detest WoW, not even I could look at how well they’ve done and scoff at how they are using a failed business model.

The reason most games fail when trying a subscription model is those games simply are not good enough to deserve a monthly sub.

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Robert Mann

I’d counter that the worst is: Nickel and dime cash shop, with P2W/P2compete shenanigans, an ‘optional’ subscription that anyone who intends to actually play cannot really avoid, and a box price on top of that.

But some people just want to yell that subs are a failed idea, because they don’t want to pay for a service. And to a point they were, but only in the sense that the subs weren’t used primarily as a measure to make the game successful. They were instead counted as pure profit, with no faith to the players.

That problem, however, isn’t about subs. It is about corporate and investor culture, and the failure of the world’s economic systems to account for the need to have things work on both sides. Which is something that goes into things I’m going to try to avoid talking about on here :)

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Cosmic Cleric

Well said. Fundamentally, if the game changes how its played to focus customer attention on the shop, then the game isn’t really a game anymore, its more like an marketing engine to connect the customers to the shop, to give up their cash.

I’d rather pay a subscription so that I get a valid game designed as a game by the devs, and not as an engine of commerce.

As to your other point, Capitalism, like any system, Democracy, Society, etc., is only as good as the people who practice it, and how they practice it. It seems like some of the unwritten rules of how we all behave with each other has been lost lately. Kind of cyclical it seems to me, multi-generationally wise. Not sure when we’ll get to the “let them eat cake” stage, hopefully it’ll move back the other way before then.

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lokoma

no……